GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 15 Aug 2018, 00:01

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

V30-09

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

MBA Section Director
User avatar
V
Joined: 19 Mar 2012
Posts: 5124
Location: India
GMAT 1: 760 Q50 V42
GPA: 3.8
WE: Marketing (Non-Profit and Government)
V30-09  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Apr 2018, 08:53
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  45% (medium)

Question Stats:

43% (01:16) correct 57% (02:18) wrong based on 7 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Employee productivity can, on average, be directly linked to the nutritional value of an employee's diet and the degree to which that employee is adequately hydrated. In a recent study of underperforming employees, the least productive among them were those who had the least nutritional diets. In a subsequent component of that same study, the underperforming employees were placed on nutrient-rich diets, and productivity steadily increased over the six month span of the study. Consequently, to boost productivity, employers should seek to promote nutrient-rich diets across its workforce to the maximum extent feasible.

Which one of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument?

A. Several study participants were already documented as those who underperformed their peers in terms of workplace productivity.
B. The least productive employees from the same company in the study who were not placed on nutrient-rich diets did not demonstrate a steady improvement in productivity.
C. Sponsoring nutrient-rich meal programs at work can be less expensive than many other means to boost workforce productivity.
D. Some employees who demonstrated poor job performance had consumed nutrient-poor meals within the prior week.
E. Several study participants were already on record as consuming nutrient-poor diets before entering the study.

_________________

Have an MBA application Question? ASK ME ANYTHING!

My Stuff: Four Years to 760 | MBA Trends for Indian Applicants

My GMAT Resources
V30-V40: How to do it! | GMATPrep SC | GMATPrep CR | GMATPrep RC | Critical Reasoning Megathread | CR: Numbers and Statistics | CR: Weaken | CR: Strengthen | CR: Assumption | SC: Modifier | SC: Meaning | SC: SV Agreement | RC: Primary Purpose | PS/DS: Numbers and Inequalities | PS/DS: Combinatorics and Coordinates

My MBA Resources
Everything about the MBA Application | Over-Represented MBA woes | Fit Vs Rankings | Low GPA: What you can do | Letter of Recommendation: The Guide | Indian B Schools accepting GMAT score | Why MBA?

My Reviews
Veritas Prep Live Online

MBA Section Director
User avatar
V
Joined: 19 Mar 2012
Posts: 5124
Location: India
GMAT 1: 760 Q50 V42
GPA: 3.8
WE: Marketing (Non-Profit and Government)
Re V30-09  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Apr 2018, 08:53
Official Solution:

Employee productivity can, on average, be directly linked to the nutritional value of an employee's diet and the degree to which that employee is adequately hydrated. In a recent study of underperforming employees, the least productive among them were those who had the least nutritional diets. In a subsequent component of that same study, the underperforming employees were placed on nutrient-rich diets, and productivity steadily increased over the six month span of the study. Consequently, to boost productivity, employers should seek to promote nutrient-rich diets across its workforce to the maximum extent feasible.

Which one of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument?


A. Several study participants were already documented as those who underperformed their peers in terms of workplace productivity.
B. The least productive employees from the same company in the study who were not placed on nutrient-rich diets did not demonstrate a steady improvement in productivity.
C. Sponsoring nutrient-rich meal programs at work can be less expensive than many other means to boost workforce productivity.
D. Some employees who demonstrated poor job performance had consumed nutrient-poor meals within the prior week.
E. Several study participants were already on record as consuming nutrient-poor diets before entering the study.

Type: Strengthen

Boil It Down: Study: Nutrient-rich boosts productivity -> companies should promote nutrient-rich

Missing Information: This study is relevant/representative of workers and companies in general; there are no other critical factors that could be involved

Goal: This argument makes a pretty substantial leap in looking at this study. We know very little about in terms of other factors that might be involved in the shifts in performance. The argument also makes a blanket recommendation to companies in general on the basis of this one study. All in all, this is a tremendously flawed argument without the necessary reassurance as to the statistical relevance of the study and its applicability in general.

A. If anything, this option seems to attack the statistical legitimacy of the study. But ultimately this option struggles to show any relevance to the proposal. Some of the study participants could've been underperformers, overachievers, or anything in the middle. That predisposition could have been known well in advance, and the study could be statistically relevant. It's just not clear how knowing that some of the participants were underperformers either strengthens or jeopardizes the proposal.

B. This option turns out to be a very significant because it helps show that the study was controlled. In the prompt, there is a sample that was given a nutrient-rich diet and the productivity improved. Now, here in B, there is a component that was NOT given a nutrient-rich diet and their productivity did not increase. This option helps to isolate a nutrient-rich diet as a key factor, and thus provides greater confidence in the proposal. In sum, B gives us for more faith in the validity of the study given that they've considered other factors and was initially presented in the prompt itself.

C. This is a classic GMAT distracter technique: mentioning cost when it's not directly relevant. In this proposal, we have no idea whether this likely difference in cost would be relevant to companies (we can't assume otherwise). Perhaps the increase in cost is nominal compared to the boost in productivity it might provide.

D. Whether the participants who demonstrated poor job performance did or did not consume nutrient-poor meals the week prior does not clearly affect the study. Mainly because we have no ability to comment on how dietary habits a week prior are relevant to the study itself. For all we know, the diet a week prior might be a completely irrelevant factor.

E. This option is virtually identical to option A, and just like option A it's unclear how knowing that several study participants consumed nutrient-poor diets prior to the study is of any relevance to the proposal either in terms of strengthening it or weakening it for that matter.

Answer: B
_________________

Have an MBA application Question? ASK ME ANYTHING!

My Stuff: Four Years to 760 | MBA Trends for Indian Applicants

My GMAT Resources
V30-V40: How to do it! | GMATPrep SC | GMATPrep CR | GMATPrep RC | Critical Reasoning Megathread | CR: Numbers and Statistics | CR: Weaken | CR: Strengthen | CR: Assumption | SC: Modifier | SC: Meaning | SC: SV Agreement | RC: Primary Purpose | PS/DS: Numbers and Inequalities | PS/DS: Combinatorics and Coordinates

My MBA Resources
Everything about the MBA Application | Over-Represented MBA woes | Fit Vs Rankings | Low GPA: What you can do | Letter of Recommendation: The Guide | Indian B Schools accepting GMAT score | Why MBA?

My Reviews
Veritas Prep Live Online

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 30 Jul 2018
Posts: 2
Re V30-09  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Jul 2018, 23:54
I think this is a high-quality question and I agree with explanation.
Re V30-09 &nbs [#permalink] 30 Jul 2018, 23:54
Display posts from previous: Sort by

V30-09

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Moderators: chetan2u, Bunuel

Events & Promotions

PREV
NEXT


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.