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V32-19

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V32-19  [#permalink]

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New post 16 May 2018, 00:25
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  55% (hard)

Question Stats:

50% (00:51) correct 50% (02:00) wrong based on 8 sessions

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Up until the mid-19th century, most Irish immigrants in America were members of the Protestant middle class. When the Great Potato Famine hit Ireland in 1845, close to 1 million poor and uneducated Irish Catholics began pouring into America to escape starvation. Despised for their alien religious beliefs and unfamiliar accents by the American Protestant majority, the immigrants had trouble finding even menial jobs. When Irish Americans in the country's cities took to the streets on St. Patrick's Day to celebrate their heritage, newspapers portrayed them in cartoons as drunk, violent monkeys.

The American Irish soon began to realize, however, that their large and growing numbers endowed them with a political power that had yet to be exploited. They started to organize, and their voting block, known as the "green machine," became an important swing vote for political hopefuls. Suddenly, annual St. Patrick's Day parades became a show of strength for Irish Americans, as well as a must-attend event for a slew of political candidates. In 1948, President Harry S. Truman attended New York City 's St. Patrick's Day parade, a proud moment for the many Irish Americans whose ancestors had to fight stereotypes and racial prejudice to find acceptance in the New World.

What is the primary purpose of the passage?

A. Document the history of St. Patrick's Day in the modern world
B. Trace the origins of the "green machine" in US political history
C. Explain the situation of Irish immigrants in America after the mid 19th century
D. Effect of the racial prejudices towards the Irish in mid 19th century America
E. Political candidates and their approach to deal with Irish immigrants

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Re V32-19  [#permalink]

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New post 16 May 2018, 00:25
1
Official Solution:

Up until the mid-19th century, most Irish immigrants in America were members of the Protestant middle class. When the Great Potato Famine hit Ireland in 1845, close to 1 million poor and uneducated Irish Catholics began pouring into America to escape starvation. Despised for their alien religious beliefs and unfamiliar accents by the American Protestant majority, the immigrants had trouble finding even menial jobs. When Irish Americans in the country's cities took to the streets on St. Patrick's Day to celebrate their heritage, newspapers portrayed them in cartoons as drunk, violent monkeys.

The American Irish soon began to realize, however, that their large and growing numbers endowed them with a political power that had yet to be exploited. They started to organize, and their voting block, known as the "green machine," became an important swing vote for political hopefuls. Suddenly, annual St. Patrick's Day parades became a show of strength for Irish Americans, as well as a must-attend event for a slew of political candidates. In 1948, President Harry S. Truman attended New York City 's St. Patrick's Day parade, a proud moment for the many Irish Americans whose ancestors had to fight stereotypes and racial prejudice to find acceptance in the New World.


What is the primary purpose of the passage?

A. Document the history of St. Patrick's Day in the modern world
B. Trace the origins of the "green machine" in US political history
C. Explain the situation of Irish immigrants in America after the mid 19th century
D. Effect of the racial prejudices towards the Irish in mid 19th century America
E. Political candidates and their approach to deal with Irish immigrants

A is wrong because St. Patrick's Day is only one of the aspect of the Irish culture that the passage discusses.

B is wrong because the origins of the Green Machine is not the purpose of the passage.

C is correct

D is wrong because the effect of racial prejudices is out of scope - the passage only talks about the Irish immigrants.

E is wrong because the approaches of political candidates is a part of the Irish history discussed.

Answer: C
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Re: V32-19  [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2018, 00:39
Hi,

The 1st paragraph talks about time till mid 19th century, is what I understand. But C option talks about time after mid 19th century, which I think only related to second paragraph.

So how can C be the correct answer, can anyone help please?

Thanks in advance.
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Re: V32-19  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Sep 2018, 10:55
somehow the primary purpose of the passage is to trace the struggle and changes in Irish situation. C only deals with 19th century
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V32-19  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Mar 2019, 08:20
mona2019 wrote:
Hi,

The 1st paragraph talks about time till mid 19th century, is what I understand. But C option talks about time after mid 19th century, which I think only related to second paragraph.

So how can C be the correct answer, can anyone help please?

Thanks in advance.

What you have inferred is absolutely correct.
The main purpose of the passage is to highlight the happening and the rise of the status of Irish immigrants in America when they started arriving in 1845.
However, the answer to your query lies in the understanding of the term: after the mid 19th century.

1st Century: '00 - '01 - The years starting from 0th year to 100th year.
21st Century: Mon, 1 Jan, 2001 – Fri, 31 Dec, 2100 - The years starting from 2001st year to 2100th year.
Analogically, 19th Century - The years starting from 1800th year to 1900th year.

The key here is to understand the accountable years are in the range of 100 less than the century mentioned.
Thus, the term after the mid 19th century. implies around the year 1845

Wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/21st_century
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V32-19   [#permalink] 17 Mar 2019, 08:20
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