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School Profile: Become Daring, Innovative, and Imaginative at MIT [#permalink]

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FROM Veritas Prep Blog: School Profile: Become Daring, Innovative, and Imaginative at MIT
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MIT is among the most prestigious colleges in the country. Students attending MIT will need to be driven and focused to tackle the academic requirements in any one of the five schools within this college. There are over 30 departments in the five schools, each with equal parts work and opportunity. MIT operates on a 4-1-4 academic calendar meaning a fall semester, a four week independent activities period in January, and finally a spring semester. The independent activities period is unique to MIT and gives students, staff, faculty, and even alumni the chance to sponsor, organize, and participate in various activities. This includes athletics, lecture series, films, tours, contests, how-to sessions, and forums among other things.

MIT is highly selective and becoming a full-time undergraduate can be difficult. Many may think you have to be an engineering genius to be considered, however, it is well balanced between professional majors and arts and science majors. There are 44 undergraduate degrees to choose from within the five schools, however a bachelor of science degree is the only one given to those who graduate. It is mandatory for each undergraduate student to complete the core curriculum referred to as General Institute Requirements. This is an extensive academic course load with recitations, lectures, weekly tests, and problem sets; additionally, each student must pass a swim test and take four quarters of physical education if a non-varsity athlete.

To ease students into the demanding rigor of this grueling academic course load, freshmen are evaluated on a “pass/no record” grading system. MIT students have the good fortune of participating in the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program where they can work directly with researchers and faculty on various projects. As an undergraduate you can initiate or join research projects for pay, academic credit, or as a volunteer. Within these research opportunities many students file patent applications, become published, or launch start-up companies. MIT has a demanding academic program, but it gives its students the tools to thrive and achieve as well as the opportunities that will support greatness.

MIT competes primarily at the NCAA Division III level in the New England Women’s and Men’s Athletic Conference. They have a diverse athletic program with 33 varsity sports, some of which are involved in different conferences. For example, the varsity women’s rowing team competes in the NCAA Division I Eastern Association of Women’s Rowing Colleges. Nearly 20% of MIT students compete in varsity athletics, and they have more Academic All-Americans than any other Division III school. MIT boasts 800  participants on 34 teams. There is also a strong intramural program on campus with over 18 sports.

Campus life at MIT starts with housing where every undergraduate student is guaranteed to be housed all four years in one of the twelve dormitories. Along with these housing dormitories there are 36 sororities, fraternities, and independent living organizations. Greek life is prominent on the MIT campus; for those who do not wish to participate, there are more than 380 student activity groups from which to choose. Along with the various clubs students can enjoy a few different museums on campus such as the List Visual Arts Center, which constantly rotates contemporary art exhibitions.

The campus offers popular weekly movie screenings, various lectures and demonstrations as well as annual events such as the entrepreneurship competition. One of the most notorious aspects to MIT campus life is “hacking,” which is clever practical joke style pranks that are both intellectually challenging and entertaining. Although no one is safe from an MIT prank, their favorite prankster rival is CalTech. MIT campus life offers students the traditional college experience with a flair for the daring and imaginative.

MIT has been big on hacks, or student pranks, since the 1870s. This is probably one of their proudest traditions, because it requires imagination, ingenuity, daring, and skill. One year they stole the CalTech cannon, and when it reappeared on the MIT campus, it was emblazoned with their own mascot on the side. They managed to make a weather balloon filled with powder rise up from the football field during a Yale vs. Harvard game. They made it appear as though the campus police car was on top of the campus dome. It’s a never-ending challenge to pull off the perfect stunt.

Other MIT traditions include Campus Preview, which by the way CalTech managed to pull off an epic hack at in 2014 (be a part of the payback that is sure to follow), the Brass Rat Ring Premier, Baker House piano drop, steer roast, and Spring Weekend, to name a few. To read more about a students perspective of MIT, check out “Why I’m ComMITted to MIT.”

If you appreciate an intellectually stimulating experience peppered by practical jokes and amazing stunts, you will definitely find a home at MIT.

Still need to take the SAT? We run a free online SAT prep seminar every few weeks. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter! Also, take a look at our profiles for The University of ChicagoPomona College, and Amherst College, and more to see if those schools are a good fit for you.

By Colleen Hill
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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How to Interpret Unfamiliar Symbols on GMAT Quant Questions [#permalink]

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FROM Veritas Prep Blog: How to Interpret Unfamiliar Symbols on GMAT Quant Questions
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Succeeding on the GMAT requires a great many things. Firstly, you must be able to decipher and solve complex logic puzzles in mere minutes. Secondly, you must be able to maintain focus for many consecutive hours. (And thirdly, you must pay to take the exam). The exam can be particularly tricky because the questions asked are rarely straight forward. Indeed, all of these elements are often linked (except potentially the payment) on questions that ask you to decode functions specific to the question at hand.

If you think about mathematics, simple operations like +, -, x and ÷ all have unmistakable meanings because we’ve all been indoctrinated since elementary school to understand what they represent. If you think back to the first time you ever encountered an addition symbol, you were probably a baffled child wondering what this fantastic symbol represented. Now that you’ve undoubtedly done thousands, if not millions of additions in your life, the symbol is mundane. The GMAT gives you that rare opportunity to relive a moment of wonder and discovery by providing you with math questions that pertain to new symbols.

A typical GMAT question will involve some kind of arbitrary symbol and a definition as to what that symbol means for the next 2 minutes or so. Typical symbols used include Greek letters, regular shapes or playing card suits (no word yet on Egyptian hieroglyphics). The symbol is being used as a “house rule”, a definition that is good for the duration of one question. This strategy, however, plays into the GMAT’s overall tactic to discombobulate you and wear you down with tedium. The exam is figuratively asking you to jump through hoops for no other purpose than to jump through said hoops (alleged actual hoop jumping section scheduled for 2015).

Let’s look at a typical symbol question and how we can avoid unnecessarily taxing our brains on these types of questions:

If the operation € is defined for all x and y by the equation x € y = 2*x*y, then 3 € (4 € 5) =

(A) 80

(B) 120

(C) 160

(D) 240

(E) 360

The exam is using the € symbol to stand in for another ad hoc equation, but the fact that your brain has to process this extra information is enough to throw some students out of their comfort zone. Added to this, the question does not ask for a single execution of this operation, but rather the resolution of a nested € equation. These foreign symbols may seem daunting, but remember there’s nothing here that wouldn’t be trivial without the bloated wording.

Let’s break this question down into its component parts. The symbol € is being defined for x and y as 2*x*y, which basically means take the two numbers together and multiply them. Once you’ve finished that, double the result, and you’re done. So if I ask for 5 € 10, I’d take 5*10, which is 50, and then double it. The answer would be 100. It’s relatively simple once you translate the equation into something meaningful, so we’re set up to execute a € equation on any two variables.

Of course the equation doesn’t give us only two variables, it gives us three. It’s logical to assume that the order of operation will matter here (hint: it actually doesn’t in this case), so we should start with the nested arguments before expanding outwardly. Within the bracket is 4 € 5, which would mean we multiply 4 by 5 and then double it, yielding a total of 20 * 2, or 40. The equation now reads 3 € 40, which means we again multiply together and then double, leaving a total of 120 * 2, or 240. Answer choice D is 240, so we have reached the correct answer.

Why did I mention that the order doesn’t matter? Because this specific example uses only multiplication, which is a commutative equation, or in other words: a x b = b x a. This isn’t always the case (think division), so it’s a good habit to always execute operations in the correct order. You may remember the mnemonic PEMDAS, which reminds you that the order of operations is {Parentheses, Exponents, Multiplication, Division, Addition, Subtraction}. In this instance the results would have been the same but that’s one more trap the GMAT test makers have at their disposal.

Another potential solution involves eliminating answer choices that cannot possibly work. If we look at the arguments provided, we have 3, 4 and 5, all of which need to be multiplied together. That product yields 60, which means that the correct answer choice must be a multiple of 60. Answer choices A and C can both be eliminated based on knowing that much. Perhaps from there you can recognize that this number needs to be doubled twice, leading you once again to answer choice D. However, this type of question is not particularly easy to backsolve unless you understand what is going on with the symbols.

In conclusion, people usually fail to correctly answer these questions because they get caught up in the abstract notation. The GMAT is a test about how you think, and the goal of many questions is simply to see if you can successfully navigate unfamiliar terminology. The same question, without the layering mechanism of the € sign would be significantly easier. Similarly, adding in another argument, such as squaring the parentheses, would appear to make this question significantly higher. In both cases, the questions should be solved in the same way, understanding the result of the symbol and methodically applying it to each argument. With some preparation, you can use your ease with these questions as a sign that you’re going to do well on test day.

Plan on taking the GMAT soon? We have GMAT prep courses starting all the time. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!

Ron Awad is a GMAT instructor for Veritas Prep based in Montreal, bringing you weekly advice for success on your exam.  After graduating from McGill and receiving his MBA from Concordia, Ron started teaching GMAT prep and his Veritas Prep students have given him rave reviews ever since.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Free Live Online GMAT Classes [#permalink]

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FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Free Live Online GMAT Classes
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Starting October 6th,  you can benefit from various sample  GMAT prep classes taught by Veritas Prep’s course creator and Vice President of Academics, Brian Galvin. Over the course of next week, we will be offering an introductory session to the GMAT as well as sample Critical Reasoning and Data Sufficiency classes.

All classes will be delivered online via Veritas Prep’s live online course platform.  They will be taught  live and will include time for students to ask questions about the course material being taught.  You will receive supplemental articles and videos, homework sheets, and a full length computer-adaptive GMAT practice test.

Throughout the week, you’ll learn about the most crucial strategies that you will need to know to achieve your desired GMAT score.

Course Syllabus:

  • Monday, October 6th at 11:00am Pacific – Introduction to the GMAT
  • Tuesday, October 7th at 11:00am Pacific – Critical Reasoning Lesson
  • Wednesday, October 8th at 11:00am Pacific – Data Sufficiency Lesson
These free live online sample GMAT classes are provided by Veritas Prep and PrepAdviser.

Interested? Click here to reserve your free spot now!

Plan on taking the GMAT soon? We also have full GMAT prep courses starting all the time. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!

By Colleen Hill
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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GMAT Tip of the Week: Getting Specific About Reading Comprehension [#permalink]

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New post 03 Oct 2014, 14:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: GMAT Tip of the Week: Getting Specific About Reading Comprehension
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Pop quiz!

1) What is the VIN number on your car?

2) What is your health insurance policy number?

3) What day does Daylight Savings Time start this coming spring?

If you’re like most people, your answer to all three is “I’d have to look that up.” And if you’re like most successful GMAT test-takers, that should be your answer to most Reading Comprehension questions, too. Particularly for questions like:

1) According to the passage, researchers were able to make the startling discovery because ______________.

2) It can be inferred from the passage that were a roundworm’s cilia become unable to sense temperature, _____________.

3) According to the passage, the reason that the antigen-antibody theory had to be seriously qualified was that ______________.

The answers to these questions are likely too obscure for you to have remembered from your initial read of the passage, and the answer choices are likely too dense to match exactly something from your memory, anyway, so when Reading Comprehension questions ask for a detail, you should always return to the passage. Thinking strategically, this means that you should:

*Not read too closely on your first read. Since you have to go back for details, they’re not all that important to remember your first time out. PLUS the main reason that people waste time and struggle on Reading Comprehension passages/questions is that they spend too much time processing and worrying about details on their first read. Much like the questions at the beginning of this post, details are only important if they ask you about them, so you shouldn’t spend too much time trying to understand or remember them until they come up in a question.

*When you’re asked about a detail, pay specific attention to the question being asked. Many details from wrong answer choices will appear next to the keyword (maybe as a cause while the question is looking for an effect, etc.) so you’ll need that time you saved from not worrying about details to help you focus in on what’s important on the question.

*Read effectively your first time through to know where certain things are discussed so that you minimize the time it takes you to go back. Give yourself “titles” for each paragraph so that you know where, for example, details of the new theory are discussed or problems with the old system appear. You will have to go back, so your first read is really about getting organized for each of those battles.

In Reading Comprehension as in life, there are often too many details to be concerned with until you absolutely have to. Know that going in, and be ready to go back and look up whatever you need when you need to.

Are you studying for the GMAT? We have free online GMAT seminars running all the time. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!

By Brian Galvin
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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School Profile: Find Adventure in Your Academic Journey at the College [#permalink]

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FROM Veritas Prep Blog: School Profile: Find Adventure in Your Academic Journey at the College of William and Mary
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The College of William and Mary is located in Williamsburg, Virginia. For a small research university, they give new meaning to the phrase, don’t let the small size fool you. The second oldest college in the country, this school has a long history of packing a big punch. Graduates include sixteen signers of the Declaration of Independence, three U.S. Presidents, and a U.S. Supreme Court Justice; it has been dubbed “the alma mater of a nation.” Students at the College of William and Mary thrive in every area, from academics to athletics to the future prosperity of their students. If you are a person who finds mediocrity distasteful, then this public research university was created for you.

The College of William and Mary combines a dedication to the study of liberal arts with a growing emphasis on science and research to create a university that regards themselves as a powerhouse in education. With over 30 undergraduate programs and 10 graduate and professional degree programs, the school is committed to a philosophy of personalized education. The student-faculty ratio is 12:1 and there is a strong focus on faculty-student collaboration; nearly half the classes have fewer than 20 students. By student enrollment, the most popular majors at the College of William and Mary are social sciences, business management, and biological and biomedical sciences. The College also offers a joint undergraduate degree program in liberal arts with the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, and a joint degree program in engineering with Columbia University.

William and Mary believes education doesn’t stop inside the classroom; students are involved in lab projects, theater, a strong international exchange program, and various community projects to enhance the pursuit of academic excellence. The College of William and Mary encourages students to reach beyond the confines of a single major and immerse themselves in all facets of their academic journeys. If you want the chance to be academically independent, but also guided by excellent faculty, then this is the University for you.

The campus life at William and Mary is as exceptional as its students. This is a University that is filled with athletes, artists, adventurers, researchers, activists, and more, so it makes sense that they have nearly four hundred clubs to accommodate such diversity of thought and talent. Whether you want to write on the campus newspaper or take an outreach trip to Africa, there is a club that allows you to delve into your passions. Cultural, political, religious, environmental, and ethnic clubs are just a few of the opportunities at your disposal. At this highly residential college, students stay on campus all four years with upscale residence and apartment housing, top-notch facilities, and the infamous eatery known as, “The Caf.”

The birthplace of Greek life, it is no wonder that roughly one-third of the student body is associated with a fraternity or sorority. Phi Beta Kappa, founded in 1776 as a literary fraternity and later becoming an honor society, was the first Greek letter in the United States. Now, besides academic fraternities and sororities, the College of William and Mary hosts an astounding 16 social fraternities and 12 sororities, five of which are historically all black. If you are a philanthropist at heart, look no further; countless service clubs are at your fingertips who provide support to underdeveloped countries offering medical aid, building houses, and supporting schools. William and Mary students, staff, and faculty are devoted to positively impacting the world around them.

The college of William and Mary fields 10 men’s and 11 women’s NCAA Division I varsity teams competing in the Colonial Athletic Association. Known as the Tribe, which represents unity, their mascot is the griffin, half eagle and half lion, which is a symbol of power and majesty. They’ve upheld that reputation with over 159 titles since the athletic program began. They lead their conference in titles and were also the first school in the CAA to reach one hundred conference titles, and that was back in 2010. Aside from their excellent varsity teams, this campus boasts 46 club sports teams, and a plethora of intramural opportunities. More than eighty percent of the student body engages in varsity sports, club sports, intramural programs, and recreational programs. Athletic excellence is a large part of this campus.

Attending the College of William and Mary offers students a vast amount of opportunities and gives them a safe space to not only call home, but also the chance to become their best selves. Among the many ways this college supports student growth is through the power of tradition. This University is steeped in tradition and it starts when freshmen enter the campus passing through the entrance of the Wren building; this act is known as Opening Convocation. They are welcomed and informed that they can solidify their places within the school community by serenading the President of the college with the Alma Mater their first week in school. Graduating seniors walk through the same building entrance as they did when they were freshmen, ringing the bell in the cupola of the Wren building before departure. If you’re looking for a place to come into your personal greatness, the College of William and Mary should be on your short list.

Still need to take the SAT? We run a free online SAT prep seminar every few weeks. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter! Also, take a look at our profiles for The University of ChicagoPomona College, and Amherst College, and more to see if those schools are a good fit for you.

By Colleen Hill
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Understanding Participles on the GMAT [#permalink]

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FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Understanding Participles on the GMAT
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There is a lot of confusion surrounding the topic of Participles so let’s take a look at it today.

Quite simply, participles are words formed from verbs which can be used as describing words (on the other hand, gerunds are verbs used as nouns, but that is a topic for another day!).

There are two types of participles:

1. The Past Participle – usually ends in -ed, -d, -t, -en, or –n

For Example: chosen, danced, known, sung etc

2. The Present Participle – ends in –ing

For Example: choosing, dancing, knowing, singing etc

These participles often start the participle phrases used to describe nouns/noun phrases/entire sentences. The participial phrases are underlined in the examples given below.

Examples:

I want to stand next to the girl wearing the yellow dress.

Standing next to the tall gentleman, she looked petite.

Battered by hail, the car collapsed.

The most important crop of this region is rice, sown in the month of June and harvested in October.

Here is how participle phrases are usually used:

Present Participle Phrases (the underlined parts of the sentences are participial phrases):

1. At the beginning of a sentence followed by a comma and then a clause (present participle phrase + comma + clause) – In this case, the participle phrase could modify the subject of the clause or the entire clause.

Examples:

Wagging its tail, my dog ran up to me. (modifies ‘my dog’)

Silencing the students, the principal stepped on to the podium. (modifies the entire clause because the principal silenced the students by stepping on to the podium)

2. At the end of a sentence separated from the clause using a comma (clause + comma + present participle phrase) – In this case, the participle phrase modifies the entire preceding sentence.

Example: The principal stepped on to the podium, silencing the students. (modifies the entire preceding clause)

3. Following a noun without a comma – In this case, the participle phrase modifies the noun.

Example: I want to stand next to the girl wearing the yellow dress. (modifies ‘the girl’)

Past Participle Phrases (the underlined parts of the sentences are participial phrases):

1. Following a noun separated by a comma (noun + comma + past participle phrase) – In this case, the participle phrase modifies the noun.

Example: The most important crop of this region is rice, sown in the month of June and harvested in October . (modifies ‘rice’)

2. At the beginning of a sentence followed by a comma and then a clause (past participle phrase + comma + clause) – In this case, the participle phrase modifies the subject of the clause.

Example: Battered by hail, the car collapsed. (modifies ‘the car’)

Note: In regular English grammar, a past participle phrase following a clause and separated by a comma (clause + comma + past participle phrase) could modify the entire preceding clause. But GMAT is not very keen on this usage; so avoid it. That said, remember that studying grammar rules in isolation is worthless. If the sentence demands such a construction, then it is correct to use it.

Let’s take one of our own questions to understand this.

Question: Due to the slow-moving nature of tectonic plate movement, the oldest ocean crust is thought to date from the Jurassic period, formed from huge fragments of the Earth’s lithosphere and lasted 200 million years.

(A)   formed from huge fragments of the Earth’s lithosphere and lasted 200 million years.

(B)   forming from huge fragments of the Earth’s lithosphere and lasting 200 million years.

(C)   forming from huge fragments of the Earth’s lithosphere and lasted 200 million years.

(D)   formed from huge fragments of the Earth’s lithosphere and lasting 200 million years.

(E)    formed from huge fragments of the Earth’s lithosphere and has been lasting 200 million years.

Here is our official solution:

The correct response is (D).

The meaning of the sentence is that the “oldest ocean crust” was “formed” in the past during the Jurassic period and is currently still “lasting” (since if it’s the “oldest” it must still be around!). We need the past tense/participle verbs to be used correctly.

If you chose (A), the ocean crust was “formed” in the past” but if “lasted” is past tense then the oldest ocean crust is no longer around, which would mean it couldn’t be the “oldest.”

If you chose (B) or (C), “forming” implies the crust is still being formed. While it’s true the Earth’s crust is constantly in flux, we’re concerned with the “oldest ocean crust” – that part that is no longer continuing to form, but was formed at some point during the Jurassic period.

If you chose (E), you correctly used “formed,” however the present perfect “has been lasting” is unnecessarily wordy. The simple participle verb form will suffice.

Does logic dictate that (D) is the correct answer? Yes. Will you ignore it because it uses past participle form modifying the previous subject/clause instead of ‘Jurassic Period’? No. Note that it is correct grammatically and you should know it. Whatever we can infer about the preferences of GMAT is from the questions it gives. GMAT doesn’t clarify its stand on every grammatical issue and the stand is probably flexible depending on the sentence under examination. So you need to be flexible in your understanding of what is and is not acceptable in GMAT. Use logic – remember, GMAT is a test of your reasoning skills. Get to the best answer under given circumstances.

Karishma, a Computer Engineer with a keen interest in alternative Mathematical approaches, has mentored students in the continents of Asia, Europe and North America. She teaches the GMAT for Veritas Prep in Detroit, Michigan, and regularly participates in content development projects such as this blog!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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School Profile: Collaboration, Community Service, and Career Developme [#permalink]

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FROM Veritas Prep Blog: School Profile: Collaboration, Community Service, and Career Development at Bates College
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Bates College, a small liberal arts college located in Lewiston, Maine, it was founded in 1855 and was one of the most forward-thinking colleges of its time. It started out as a seminary and was a stop on the Underground Railroad; consequently, many of the first students were former slaves. Throughout time they have remained a diverse and inclusive school that promotes the importance of rigorous academia coupled with the betterment of oneself.

At Bates College students can choose from thirty-five interdisciplinary and departmental majors along with twenty-six secondary concentrations. Many students double major, graduate with a major and minor, or graduate with a major and two general education concentrations. This allows them to enter the professional world with a strong and diverse academic background.

The average class size at Bates is no more than twenty students, and 100% of the faculty hold the highest degree in their respective fields. Diverse academic options combined with personalized teaching offers students a strong foundation for academic success. There are a wide range of study abroad options that more than 60% of the student body take advantage of, plus internships, fieldwork, and research opportunities that stretch and challenge students.

At Bates, all students take part in a first year seminar where you, a small group of peers, and a chosen professor will dive into a specialized topic that models the type of work you’ll be doing for all four college years. This will fold into your senior thesis that will usually be the first step towards graduate study or your first job after college. Bates College is perfect for students who want strong guidance while gaining the tools and education to lead successful professional careers upon graduation.

Campus life at Bates is diverse and centers around community. The student housing, clubs and organizations, and the student-run coffee house, simply referred to as The Ronj, help cultivate the sense of community. All freshmen live on campus in first-year residence halls where they get to know one another and adjust to campus life under the guidance of the some of the upper-classmen. Most students live on campus in either a residence hall or one of the 25 beautiful Victorian houses.

There are more than 100 clubs and organizations for students to participate in as well as a myriad of services that benefit student success. They include student employment, community service projects, and career development opportunities. Students can collaborate and get to know one another at The Ronj, where they can play pool, watch movies, or attend concerts and other events while snacking on some delicious grub. The Ronj also offers services like catering campus events, and it functions as an open space for creative writing, broadcast art, comedy, theater, and much more.

Bates College competes in Division III athletics in the New England Small College Athletic Conference with 14 men’s and 15 women’s varsity teams. They have won countless championships in a variety of varsity sports. Club teams include rugby, ice hockey, ultimate Frisbee, sailing, and more. Intramural sports are available for those who play simply for the love of the game.

The athletic facilities at Bates are state-of-the-art; among them are an ice hockey rink, several courts, a boathouse, a swimming pool, tracks, and various outdoor fields. The football field is one of the oldest in the nation. For those who just like to maintain their physical fitness, there is access to facilities such as the weight room that includes treadmills and elliptical machines.

Traditions are a big part of Bates College; some go back nearly one hundred years. One of the most prominent traditions is the Winter Carnival where festivities last four days and are created by the Bates Outing Club, centered around a new theme every year. This fun carnival is all about celebrating winter in Maine, where you might find competitions like tray and three legged races. Other activities could include an ice skating party, a casual bonfire, or a concert. The big finale on the last day of Winter Carnival is the puddle jump, and no this is not skipping through puddles; you’ll have to see for yourself when you become a Bates Bobcat!

Still need to take the SAT? We run a free online SAT prep seminar every few weeks. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter! Also, take a look at our profiles for The University of ChicagoPomona College, and Amherst College, and more to see if those schools are a good fit for you.

By Colleen Hill
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What Should I Do After I Submit My MBA Applications? [#permalink]

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New post 07 Oct 2014, 16:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: What Should I Do After I Submit My MBA Applications?
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Congratulations! You have submitted your MBA applications! But, just because you have hit the submit button does not necessarily mean you have reached the end of the business school application process. This assumes of course that you have put your best foot forward in the process and followed all of my helpful advice!  The first thing to do, after the celebratory beer or soda of course, is to sit down and make an assessment of your plans.

This time of year, having submitted applications means you either finished in time for early action schools or early first-round schools.  From a planning perspective, this is quite an advantage, since in some cases, you will know whether or not you get in before Thanksgiving (even earlier if you applied to rolling admissions programs).  Knowing by November can help you either relax throughout the holidays, or possibly line up another battery of schools to tackle for round two.  Round two admissions typically conclude around the first week or two of January, so there is plenty of time to wrap up another set of applications by then.

If you find yourself satisfied with your first round of applications and do not plan on applying to more schools, there are several ways to bide your time until the decision date.  Perhaps the most important thing you can do is to prepare for interviews.  You never know when you will get that call, and typically schools will want you to come in for an interview soon afterwards, leaving in some cases precious little time to prepare.  Visiting the schools while you wait is a great way to prepare, and most will let you sit in on a class.  This perspective can really help provide insight into why you fit with that particular school well beyond what you glean from the websites and info sessions.  For some it may be inconvenient to visit the school prior to your interview for logistical or scheduling reasons, but if you can, you will be glad you did.

Another important thing to do is to read.  If you don’t already do so, begin reading the Wall Street Journal on a daily basis (or the Financial Times, or both).  Additionally you should try to read some of the more popular business magazines such as Bloomberg Business Week or Forbes or Fast Company.  These will not only help you prepare for interviews, but will also get your mind oriented towards the analytical thinking required in b-school.  Barron’s is a great way to spend a Sunday afternoon too.

Remember, no matter what your concentration in business school, the MBA degree is a general degree, which will require you to be conversant across every core business discipline.  Yes, even if you have no interest in the stock market or accounting principles, you will still be learning about how to compute bond yields and balance T-accounts in business school, so might as well start now learning about it.

Learn about top MBA programs by downloading our Essential Guides! Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or click here to take our Free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter.

Bryant Michaels has over 25 years of professional post undergraduate experience in the entertainment industry as well as on Wall Street with Goldman Sachs. He served on the admissions committee at the Fuqua School of Business where he received his MBA and now works part time in retirement for a top tier business school. He has been consulting with Veritas Prep clients for the past six admissions seasons. See more of his articles here.
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SAT Tip of the Week: Here Are Your Dos and Don'ts Before Test Day [#permalink]

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New post 08 Oct 2014, 09:00
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FROM Veritas Prep Blog: SAT Tip of the Week: Here Are Your Dos and Don'ts Before Test Day
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The time has come. The SAT is finally here. After months of preparation, this Saturday, October 11, is the day to finally demonstrate your skills to the College Board. In terms of studying, the SAT is not like a midterm so there is no benefit to cramming. In fact it can have an adverse effect on your score.

At this point, vocabulary should be mastered and all practice tests and homework sections should have been reviewed. If you have done so (and simulated the test day environment with your last couple practice tests) you have done the hard part. Now you can rest easy because you are ready to take the test. However, there are some outside factors that can help elevate your performance on test day. Here are some pretest and test day dos and don’ts:

DO get to bed early on Thursday and Friday night. A lot of students forget how important sleep is to critical thinking and test performance. Whatever you had planned Thursday night, put it off until after the SAT. You want to get at least eight hours both of nights. It is essential.

DO wake up a full two hours before the test. You want your mind performing at its best. It is important to avoid any grogginess on the day of the test, so be sure you’re up long enough for the morning sluggishness to wear off.

DO warm up your brain on Saturday morning. Treat this like an athletic event. Would you start a game without stretching? No, so it is important to stretch the brain. Maybe do a Sudoku puzzle or a crossword. You can also review one to two SAT questions from each section. Nothing strenuous and nothing for more than 5 to 10 minutes. Just enough to make sure that you are processing at full speed the minute you get your essay prompt.

DO eat healthy. This includes protein, complex carbohydrates, and fruit. During the breaks, make sure to stretch out and walk around. Bring healthy snacks to keep your energy level up. My go to snacks on test day were bananas, apples, and almonds (and for breakfast I had oatmeal).

DON’T learn new vocab or do any more test preparation on Thursday afternoon or Friday. By this point, you either know it or you don’t. This can cause unneeded stress and anxiety. You are ready, so don’t psyche yourself out.

DON’T stay up all night watching Netflix or going on the internet. On Thursday and Friday night, don’t look at electronic screens that much after 5 or 6 PM. Read a book, go outside, play a game. Anything that keeps your mind sharp.

DON’T roll out of bed thirty minutes before the test. This may be tempting to get the most sleep possible, but make that a reality by going to bed early. Waking up that close to the test puts you in a fog. This is a very crucial one.

DON’T drink energy drinks or change your normal diet extensively. You don’t want your test concentration and focus to be disrupted by a growling stomach or restless legs.

DON’T sit down on breaks. Make sure to stretch and walk around. Do not congregate with others and discuss the previous section. This is a natural tendency, but it is a form of cheating and it can psyche you out. Walk around, eat your snacks, and talk about anything else besides the test.

All of these things are recommended to optimize your test day performance. You have prepped, you know the strategies, and now it is time to finally succeed on the SAT. Apply these do’s and don’ts to put your best foot forward. Be calm and confident going into the test, and you will do great. Best of luck!

Still need to take the SAT? We run a free online SAT prep seminarevery few weeks. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!

Jake Davidson is a Mork Family Scholar at USC and enjoys writing for the school paper as well as participating in various clubs. He has been tutoring privately since the age of 15 and is incredibly excited to help students succeed on the SAT.

 
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1 Important Rule for GMAT Sentence Correction [#permalink]

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New post 09 Oct 2014, 18:00
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FROM Veritas Prep Blog: 1 Important Rule for GMAT Sentence Correction
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Some sentence structures seemingly stupefy scholarly students. One of the main reasons the GMAT chooses to test logic through sentence correction is that the rules of grammar are much more flexible than most students realize. We (hopefully) remember some of the basic rules of sentences. Sentences should have a subject and a predicate, but you can often shorten sentences in specific contexts. Like this. The rules we’ve learned in high school are relevant, but (to paraphrase Pirates of the Caribbean) they’re more like guidelines.

The one “rule” I’d like to discuss in particular today is the notion that a sentence must always be in the same tense from beginning to end. This parameter is helpful and applicable in most situations, but it is in no way a restriction that can never be circumvented. In the absence of other incentives, it makes sense as a de facto plan, but it doesn’t have to be followed blindly. It’s like taking the subway to work and getting off at the station closest to your work. By default, you should get off at that station, but that doesn’t mean you can’t detour to a different station to pick up your boss’ favorite breakfast once in a while.

In a typical sentence, randomly shifting tenses doesn’t make any sense. Consider a sentence like “Ron watches Frozen on repeat and liked it when Elsa sings” (#Frozen). This sentence doesn’t make sense because it jumps from the present tense of watching the movie to the past tense for liking and then back to the presence for the singing. This sentence would have to be “Ron watches Frozen on repeat and likes it when Elsa sings” or “Ron watched Frozen on repeat and liked it when Elsa sang”. Either alternative provides a cohesive sentence that illustrates Ron’s adulation for animated movies.

However not all sentences are tied to the default structure of always maintaining the same verb tense. The meaning of the sentence will dictate the verb tense, so meaning must always be considered when considering possible answer choices in sentence correction. A sentence could read: “Ron beams with pride when he recalls how Frozen won best animated song at the Oscars”. The sentence discusses Ron’s present pride when thinking back to an event that happened in the past, so the fact that the third verb is in the past makes sense with the meaning of the sentence. The pride actively comes whenever he recalls the one specific moment in the past (performed memorably by Adele Dazeem).

Let’s look at an example of how varying verb tenses shouldn’t slow us down on an actual GMAT problem:

Attempts to standardize healthcare, an important issue to both state and national officials, has not eliminated the difference in the quality of care existing between upper and lower income families.

(A) Has not eliminated the difference in the quality of care existing

(B) Has not been making a difference eliminating the quality of care that exists

(C) Has not made an elimination in the quality of care that exists

(D) Have not eliminated the difference in the quality of care that exists

(E) Have not been making a difference eliminating the quality of care existing

This sentence has more issues than simply verb tense, as we can quickly identify a 3-2 split between has and have in the first word. Simply being able to determine which of these elements is correct will eliminate at least two choices, so it’s the first decision point we should tackle.

The modifier “…an important issue…” can be ignored for the purposes of identifying the subject in this sentence. Thus the sentence essentially reads “Attempts to standardize healthcare has not eliminated…” which highlights the fact that “Attempts” is the subject, and thus the verb should be plural instead of singular. This means that answer choices A, B and C can all be eliminated. The correct answer must be either choice D or choice E.

Looking at answer choice D: “Attempts to standardize healthcare… have not eliminated the difference in the quality of care that exists…”we may notice the verb tense discrepancy I mentioned earlier. The sentence describes issues in the past, but then mentions their ramifications in the present. This is acceptable because the meaning of the sentence is preserved. Attempts to make changes in the past have not yet had the desired effect in the present. Many students eliminate answer choice D because of the verb tense issue, but this is not a valid reason as the sentence structure is logical. Let’s look at answer choice E and see if we can eliminate it and leave D as the last answer standing (coming to NBC this fall).

Answer choice E: “Attempts to standardize healthcare… have not been making a difference eliminating the quality of care existing” is perhaps more tempting because the verb is a participle (existing). However the meaning of this sentence changes from the original meaning, as the attempts now do not make a difference in eliminating the quality of care. This is much worse than the original intent, and can be eliminated because of the meaning alteration alone. Answer choice E is incorrect, and thus the answer must be answer choice D.

When choosing between two (or more) answer choices, it’s important to always consider the meaning of the sentence. If the meaning of the sentence is logical, then the grammar may have been purposely chosen to make you doubt the answer choice. Remember that sentences do not always need to have the same verb tense, and that the logic of the sentence will play a big role in determining whether an answer choice is acceptable. If you keep these elements in mind, you’ll start finding sentence correction much less tense.

Plan on taking the GMAT soon? We have GMAT prep courses starting all the time. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!

Ron Awad is a GMAT instructor for Veritas Prep based in Montreal, bringing you weekly advice for success on your exam.  After graduating from McGill and receiving his MBA from Concordia, Ron started teaching GMAT prep and his Veritas Prep students have given him rave reviews ever since.
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How to Succeed as a Young MBA Applicant [#permalink]

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New post 10 Oct 2014, 16:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: How to Succeed as a Young MBA Applicant
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Age is nothing but a number, is how the old saying goes, but when it comes to the world of business school admissions, this particular number can negatively signal much, much more. “Immature”, “not ready”, “lack of work experience”, “no leadership” are some of the thoughts admissions officers toss around when discussing the applications of young candidates.

The first step to success here is to really understand how a young candidate is viewed by admissions. This is important because the only way to properly set your application strategy is to understand how decision makers will view your profile. Understanding this and creating a strategy that properly counteracts the general perception of young candidates and the specific perception of your profile will set you on your way to MBA application success.

Next, it is time to really do your homework. What is the subject you ask? You! Focus on your motivations for pursuing a graduate education in business and really determine if right now is the ideal time to pursue your MBA. If you don’t ask yourself these very simple questions, I promise you, the admissions officers will! Another important question to address is “What are your career goals?” This again has to be very thought out, clear, and make sense given your pre-MBA work experience and targeted coursework. Admissions will scrutinize these areas even more for younger candidates, since they pose red flags because of limited work experience in comparison to peers.

These areas are of particular importance because admissions officers use these questions to gauge maturity, self-awareness, and clarity of goals for candidates. They want to make sure you have done your research and truly are ready for business school. Being ready and prepared for business school is a great start but being qualified on paper is even more important for younger candidates when compared to “traditional” candidates. As a more recent college graduate, admissions will scrutinize GPA and GMAT scores more closely in comparison to a more seasoned applicant with many years of work experience and potentially more leadership and teamwork experiences.

You are ready and prepared for business school, qualified on paper, but what value would your presence in the classroom bring to others? Classroom discussion and group work are the hallmarks of graduate business education, if from your work experience it is not clear the contributions you would bring to the MBA community it will be difficult to breakthrough at top programs. Clearly articulating your value add to your target program via essay topics, in-person interviews, and resume construction will round out your profile and dismiss the majority of concerns as a younger candidate, and finally ensure that when it comes to your application, age is nothing but a number.

Want to craft a strong application? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today. Click here to take our Free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!

Dozie A. is a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. His specialties include consulting, marketing, and low GPA/GMAT applicants.
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2 Sentence Correction GMAT Questions Involving Participle Modifiers [#permalink]

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New post 13 Oct 2014, 09:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: 2 Sentence Correction GMAT Questions Involving Participle Modifiers
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Today, as promised last week, we will look at a couple of questions involving participle modifiers. We will take one question in which you should use the participle and another in which you should not.

Let’s see how we decide that.

Question 1: In the wake of the global housing crisis, and amid dramatically changing demographics, it is likely that a widespread shift in thinking is ahead, which will reduce demand for large suburban homes, thus increasing demand for smaller urban apartments.

(A) it is likely that a widespread shift in thinking is ahead, which will reduce demand for large suburban homes, thus increasing demand for smaller urban apartments.

(B) it is likely that a widespread shift in thinking is ahead, which will reduce demand for large suburban homes, and thus increase demand for smaller urban apartments.

(C) it is not unlikely that a widespread shift in thinking is ahead, reducing demand for large suburban homes, thus creating an increase in demand for smaller urban apartments.

(D) it is not unlikely that a widespread shift in thinking is ahead, reducing demand for large suburban homes and increasing demand for smaller urban apartments.

(E) it is not unlikely that a widespread shift in thinking is ahead, reducing demand for large suburban homes, increasing demand for smaller urban apartments.

Solution: Let’s start looking for decision points – the first decision point is ‘it is likely’ vs ‘it is not unlikely’ – both have similar meanings and are grammatically correct so we cannot eliminate any option based on this right now. The next decision point is the beginning of the modifier. Options (A) and (B) use ‘which clauses’. Options (C), (D) and (E) use present participle modifiers.

‘which’ is a relative pronoun but there is no noun before it which can act as an antecedent. Hence, the use of which is incorrect here. On the other hand, the use of participle modifier is acceptable here. Last week, we discussed that present participle modifier after a comma will modify the preceding clause. It provides additional information about the preceding clause. ‘reducing …’ tells us more about ‘widespread shift in thinking‘. Hence, let’s focus on options (C), (D) and (E).

In (C), the “thus” used to introduce the second participle is incorrect: the two participles should be linked with a coordinating conjunction without a comma. One is not really leading to the other – they are both byproducts of the change in thinking – reducing demand for large homes and increasing demand for urban apartments. Lastly, in option (C), the “creating an…” is unnecessary and redundant – you just need “increasing demand.”

For option (E), you need something to link the two participle phrases together – without it, there is a comma splice error. Hence we eliminate (E) as well.

Option (D) gets the structure and meaning correct – “the shift in thinking is reducing … and increasing …”

Answer is (D).

Now, let’s look at an official GMAT question.

Question 2: In 1984, medical researchers at Harvard and Stanford universities concluded that sedentary life-styles lead to heart and lung diseases that shorten lives, strongly recommending middle-aged people to undertake some form of regular exercise.

(A) strongly recommending middle-aged people to

(B) strongly recommending that middle-aged people should

(C) and strongly recommended for middle-aged people to

(D) and their strong recommendation was for middle-aged people to

(E) and they strongly recommended that middle-aged people

Solution: The given sentence has two clauses:

Main clause – medical researchers at Harvard and Stanford universities concluded

That clause – that sedentary life-styles lead to heart and lung diseases that shorten lives

If we use a comma and the present participle ‘recommending’ here, it will modify the ‘that clause’. So ‘recommending’ will be done by ‘sedentary life-styles’. Obviously, this is incorrect since the researchers are the ones who recommend exercise. So we cannot use the participle here. Hence we eliminate options (A) and (B).

Options (C), (D) and (E) use ‘recommend’ in verb form.

Options (C) and (D) are unidiomatic in their usage of the verb recommend.

You recommend X for Y (say a person X for position Y)

or

You recommend that X do Y (say a person X do Y)

Option (C) says ‘recommended for X to do Y’ and option (D) says ‘recommendation was for X to do Y’ – both are incorrect.

Option (E) uses recommend properly – ‘recommended that X do Y’. Also, ‘… researchers concluded that … and recommended that …’ have parallel structure. Hence, option (E) is correct.

Answer (E)

Hope you now understand how participle phrases are used.

Karishma, a Computer Engineer with a keen interest in alternative Mathematical approaches, has mentored students in the continents of Asia, Europe and North America. She teaches the GMAT for Veritas Prep in Detroit, Michigan, and regularly participates in content development projects such as this blog!
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Get to Know Your MBA Professors [#permalink]

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New post 14 Oct 2014, 11:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Get to Know Your MBA Professors
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Over the summer, one of my Veritas Prep clients from last year asked me if I had any advice for him before school started. Offering advice is what I do for a living, so it’s a safe bet that I did, but he probably knew that before he asked. This 3-part blog series grew out of that initial off-the-cuff email response and is designed for anyone in any stage of business school, whether you’re still researching schools, walking onto campus for the first time, or have graduation in the near future. Your two years will fly by, and you want to make sure you graduate without saying “If only I had ….”

Part Three – Tear Down that Glass Wall!

If you went to a large undergraduate school, the concept of getting to know a professor might sound pretty unrealistic. She might have been just a speck in the front of an enormous lecture hall, or graduate TAs might have been your primary instructors. If you attended a smaller school, the faculty might have seemed more approachable, but the age and experience gaps could still be a little intimidating. Either way, you might have felt as if an invisible glass wall stood between the class and The Mysterious Professor.

In business school you’ll find the interaction can be different. It’s not uncommon to have a professor whose age makes them closer to a peer, and because professors encourage students to bring real-world experiences into the classroom, sometimes the teacher/student roles are reversed. Although the faculty still garners well-deserved respect from their students, the barrier between “us” and “them” is much less rigid than it was in undergrad.

Don’t misunderstand – professors are still authority figures and based on that alone, they can seem inaccessible. They’ll issue your grade at the end of the course, and the mere prospect of a cold call from them can induce fear into even the most over-confident investment banker. Some are downright famous. And oh yeah, they can be scary smart. (Imagine my cohort’s surprise when, on the first day of our first semester operations class, our professor called on us by name! It turns out he had memorized all of our faces and names, using the pre-Facebook version of Facebook.)

But don’t be intimidated – breaking through the wall has many benefits. At the risk of stating the obvious, you could learn something. That course you’re taking represents a mere sliver of what she knows about the subject. You can also bridge the gap between academics and career development. Many professors maintain outside consulting relationships with companies and can actually be quite good sources of career advice and even job leads. (And speaking of job leads, sometimes they need second-year students as TA’s.) Some professors even act as angel investors, so if you’re entrepreneurially minded, you might land some good advice at minimum or an investor at most.

Some schools make it easy to do this. Wharton offers a popular Take A Professor To Lunch program. My team did this several times, and it was well worth it. We loved that our buttoned-up accounting professor, known for wearing suits, panty hose and heels on class days, showed up for lunch in jeans and flip flops. Professors! They’re just like us! Darden is famous for “First Coffees” – a dedicated time after the first class of the day when students, faculty, and visitors all gather.

If there’s no organized program at your school, you’ll have to put forth some effort, but that doesn’t mean it’s hard. Even the most famous professors still have office hours; professors at Darden even have an open door policy. If you’re in their class, go visit. Bring questions about something discussed in a lecture. If you aren’t in the professor’s class but have a shared career or research interest, reach out to request a brief meeting. Now, not every single professor will welcome this level of contact, and that’s fine. If you encounter indifference, don’t sweat it and don’t take it personally. Just move on.

Professors are busy folks – among teaching MBAs (and maybe undergrads and PhDs, too), outside consulting, and of course their research and writing, time is at a premium – so be respectful. Don’t hog the ENTIRE office hour. Do your research – at minimum, read their bio on the school’s website, look over a few of their publications, or leaf through their latest book. Bring some specific questions that prove you’re exactly the sort of curious, well-prepared student who’s worth their time. Be cautious, though, about connecting with your professors on social media – to maintain boundaries, some discourage Facebook or LinkedIn invites while you’re still a student.

If you’re still in the application process, listen up. These very professors will have a profound influence on you, so do your due diligence. When you visit campus, observe the interactions between faculty and students. Ask students how accessible their professors are outside of class. If your school visit offers an opportunity to meet the faculty, take advantage of it. Ask about the protocol for reaching out to professors during the admissions process. Schools sometimes discourage this, but if you have a specific area of interest, the admissions office might be willing to facilitate an introduction.

Making a relatively small effort to tear down the wall between the front of the room and the back of the room can pay big dividends. You’ll at least end up just that much smarter; you might end up with a mentor, an investor or even a lifelong friend!

Want to craft a strong application? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today. Click here to take our Free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!

Rachel is a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for The Wharton School at University of Pennsylvania, and Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University. Her specialties include consulting, older and part-time applicants, and international candidates.
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SAT Tip of the Week: Why Do You Need Our Prep Course? [#permalink]

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FROM Veritas Prep Blog: SAT Tip of the Week: Why Do You Need Our Prep Course?
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There are very few people whose idea of a good time includes spending hours outside of regular school poring over SAT material. With all the other constraints on a high school student’s time, is it worth it to do an SAT prep course? The honest answer is yes. The SAT is very important to the university admissions process and the skills necessary for lifting an SAT score can be learned over a much shorter period of time than it takes to dramatically change a four year GPA or achieve success in extracurricular activities. In terms of results for the time put in, success on the SAT is a lot of bang for your buck, and the skills learned in SAT prep are applicable to any standardized or multiple choice test.

SAT Prep can help a student get into college. Most highly competitive schools have an SAT (or ACT) range that most students fall into.  There are certainly students who get admitted to competitive schools who are outside of this range, but many schools use SAT scores and GPAs as an initial cut off to cull down the number of admissions. Particularly high SAT scores or GPAs can even help to advance students in the admissions process who fall outside of the schools range in other areas. The bottom line is the SAT matters to admissions officers at most schools.

Taking the SAT is a skill that can be learned. The SAT is not a test of how well you have retained the information taught in school: the SAT is a test of how well you can take the SAT. There are a number of general test taking skills that SAT courses can provide, things like plugging in answer choices and eliminating incorrect answers to find correct answers, but SAT prep also gives students SAT specific skills and stresses the information that is and is not required for success on the test. These are all learnable skills that can dramatically increase scores. For many students, as little as six weeks of concerted study can increase scores by 200-300 points. This is less than a single semester in school and thus less time than it takes to even affect one high school grading period.

Whether or not you do any test preparation should certainly depend on the desired outcome of the test taker. If you are happy with your scores, or if you have done no work on your own and are interested in seeing how much you can accomplish unguided, then you should pursue that goal. The advantage of doing a prep course is access to an expert who understands the material and is able to give specific help on how to approach the SAT.  It’s simply too important and too unique a skill set to assume that high school will give you adequate preparation, so whatever you do, do something that focuses on the actual skills required to succeed on SAT. Happy preparations!

Plan on taking the SAT soon? We run a free online SAT prep seminar every few weeks. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!

David Greenslade is a Veritas Prep SAT instructor based in New York. His passion for education began while tutoring students in underrepresented areas during his time at the University of North Carolina. After receiving a degree in Biology, he studied language in China and then moved to New York where he teaches SAT prep and participates in improv comedy. Read more of his articles here, including How I Scored in the 99th Percentile and How to Effectively Study for the SAT.
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School Profile: Become Savvy in International Relations at Tufts Unive [#permalink]

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FROM Veritas Prep Blog: School Profile: Become Savvy in International Relations at Tufts University
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Tufts University is located on a hill outside Medford, Massachusetts. This small suburban research university began in 1854 as a liberal arts college. In 1933, the University added Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, which was the first graduate school in the country for international affairs. Under the tenure of Tufts’ President, Jean Mayer, the college transformed into an elite research university. Today, Tufts boasts two undergraduate programs, the School of Arts and Sciences, and the School of Engineering, and eight graduate and professional schools in arts and sciences, engineering, veterinary medicine, dental medicine, international relations, nutrition science and policy, medicine, and biomedical sciences.

Academically, it is the mission of Tufts University to help students recognize the combinations of cross-disciplinary studies required to solve the complex global challenges of the present and the future. The University empowers students toward that goal with world class research capabilities combined with the personalized rigor of a small college. Students can choose from more than 70 majors among the two undergraduate schools, although 90% of students are enrolled in the School of Arts and Sciences.

By enrollment, the most popular undergraduate majors at Tufts are international relations and biological sciences. Undergraduates are considered an essential part of ongoing university research. Because of the university’s strong international focus, nearly half of all Tufts undergraduates study abroad for at least a semester. Famous Tufts graduates include singer Tracy Chapman, author Anita Shreve, television personality Meredith Vieira, and astronaut Frederick Hauck.

Over 70% of Tufts students live in one of 40 on or off campus housing properties. Freshmen are required to live on campus in Tilton, Houston, Hill, or Haskell Halls unless they are able to verify that they commute from their parents’ homes. They must also enroll in the premium meal plan with Carmichael or Dewick-MacPhie dining halls, which are open seven days a week. Students have several clubs and organizations available to them including musical groups, performance arts groups like dance or opera, and student journalism opportunities, such as the campus television or radio stations.

Students report enjoying the proximity to Davis Square for shopping and eating out at one of many restaurants serving diverse culinary choices. Entertainment suggestions include capture the flag at Powerhouse Park, Sacco’s Bowling at Davis Square, a nap on President’s Lawn, or the view from the roof of Tisch Library.  If you are old enough to drink, trivia night at PJ Ryan’s is on Tuesdays, or there is Friday night wine tasting at Ball Square Fine Wines. There’s good vegan food at True Bistro in Teele Square, if you’re into it.

Tufts University has 14 men’s and 15 women’s NCAA Division III teams competing in the New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC). Recent accolades have gone to Tufts first-ever NCAA Division III team title, won by the men’s lacrosse team in 2010; a national individual title in women’s tennis the same year, and most recently, a men’s national individual diving title. There are an additional 16 club sports for students to participate in at Tufts. Students can also join in nine intramural fall sports and five spring sports with a Tufts ID, which must be presented at each event. The University’s commitment to healthy living and fitness for all students is clearly demonstrated with the state-of-the-are Tisch Sports and Fitness Center, and all students are encouraged to take advantage of it.

A special Tufts tradition takes place on President’s lawn when incoming freshmen light a candle in honor of Charles Tufts their first night on campus; four years later, they repeat the ceremony the night before graduation. Another Tufts tradition is painting the cannon and then guarding it until daybreak to be sure your work isn’t painted over by someone else. The Spring Fling concert just before finals has been a Tuft’s tradition since 1980. For 75 years, students have awakened Halloween morning to find their campus “pumpkin’d” with pumpkins all over the place; these are just some of the Tufts traditions you’ll experience.

If you want the comfort of a small campus with the world class research opportunities of a major research university, and you have a heart for solving global issues, Tufts is the place to apply.

Still need to take the SAT? We run a free online SAT prep seminar every few weeks. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter! Also, take a look at our profiles for The University of ChicagoPomona College, and Amherst College, and more to see if those schools are a good fit for you.

By Colleen Hill

 
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Understanding 1337 GMAT Logic [#permalink]

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FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Understanding 1337 GMAT Logic
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One of the most difficult tasks on the GMAT is to properly interpret what the question is really asking. The GMAT is loaded with dense terminology, accurate but irrelevant prose and confusing technical jargon (and that’s just the instruction page!) The verbiage is dense on purpose, with the deciphering of the information part of the skills being tested. And since this task only gets more challenging as you get more tired throughout the exam, it’s important to recognize the vocabulary used on the GMAT. To borrow from geek culture, you need to understand the GMAT 1337 speak.

For those unfamiliar with 1337, it is known as “leet” or “leetspeak” wherein English alphabet letters are replaced by the number that resembles them the most. It uses 1 for L, 3 for E and 7 for T, allowing the number 1337 to stand in for leet, cacographic shorthand for “elite”. (Think of it as pig Latin for the 21st Century). In essence, some people have devised a sublanguage of English that is hard to read for the average person, but very easy to understand for anyone versed in the language’s rules. The same logic can be applied on GMAT questions.

Many terms that you’ll encounter on the GMAT are commonplace in math milieus, but most GMAT students don’t spend much time in such environments. Almost all students have also learned many of the terms long ago, like quotient and decimal, but have since forgotten their definitions because they don’t use them in everyday situations. Other concepts, like Data Sufficiency, only really exist on the GMAT and are not used in the same manner in the real world. This melange of issues can sometimes make it feel like the exam is speaking a language you don’t.

The ideal situation would be to avoid encountering any new or exotic word on test day, which hopefully means you’ve seen all of them during your test preparation. Moreover, simply understanding what each individual word means isn’t enough either, the entire meaning of the sentence must be clear in order to get the correct answer. As always, practice makes perfect, so let’s look at a sample GMAT problem and put the pieces together:

If R and S are positive integers, can the fraction R/S be expressed as a decimal with only a finite number of nonzero digits?

(1)    S is a factor of 100

(2)    R is a factor of 100

(A)   Statement 1 alone is sufficient but statement 2 alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked.

(B)   Statement 2 alone is sufficient but statement 1 alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked.

(C)   Both statements 1 and 2 together are sufficient to answer the question but neither statement is sufficient alone.

(D)   Each statement alone is sufficient to answer the question.

(E)    Statements 1 and 2 are not sufficient to answer the question asked and additional data is needed to answer the statements.

For many students, a question worded in this way is dreadful. The question is asking about two positive integers, R and S, and what happens if we divide one by the other. Could the resulting fraction be expressed as a decimal, and if so, would that decimal have a finite number of nonzero digits?

Let’s tackle these issues one at a time. If we divide R by S, could the fraction be written as a decimal? Yes, say the fraction were 2/3, this could be rewritten as 0.666… However this decimal would go on forever with 6’s, as opposed to the fraction 2/4 which would be rewritten as 0.500 and would stop there. The second part of this question is asking us to make this distinction: does the number continue on forever or does it have a finite number of digits after which it is completed. A number like 2/3 continues with an infinite number of 6’s, whereas 2/4 culminates in a finite number of nonzero digits.

Once you understand exactly what the question is asking for, it becomes much simpler to answer it. We can answer “no” if we find a decimal that goes on to infinity (and beyond). We can answer “yes” if the decimal ends at a specific point. We can determine a few simple examples in our heads (1/3, ½, ¾, etc) and then look at statement 1.

Statement 1 tells us that integer S (the denominator) is a factor of 100. A factor means that I can divide 100 by an integer and get another integer, so 1, 2, 4, 5, 10, 20, 25, 50 and 100 are all factors of 100. It wouldn’t take too long to test that every one of these nine numbers, as the denominator, will end in a finite point. Logically, this is because the prime factorization of 100 is 2^2 * 5^2, and therefore all the factors of 100 will be some multiples of 2’s and 5’s, both of which are finite decimals (0.5 and 0.2, respectively). Try as you might, any numerator over 2 will end in x.0 or x.5, and any numerator over 5 will end in x.0, x.2, x.4, x.6 or x.8 (next five series of X-box consoles?). Since it is impossible to get an infinite decimal with these denominators, statement 1 will be sufficient to say the decimal will definitely end.

Statement 2 tells us that integer R (the numerator) is a factor of 100. This means that R can be the same 9 options we had for statement 1 (1, 2, 4, 5, 10, 20, 25, 50 and 100), but it doesn’t provide the same amount of help as defining the denominator does. If the numerator is 1, then the denominator can be 2 (finite) or 3 (not finite) and I’d have completely different answers. For the same reason that the numerator didn’t matter in statement 1, it doesn’t matter in statement 2, either.

If statement 1 gives us a definitive answer and statement 2 can go either way, then the correct answer to this question must be answer choice A. However getting the right answer is dependent on first understanding the question being asked. Just as with any language, maximum exposure will lead to maximum comprehension and retention, even if sometimes the terms seem peculiar. Remember that if you speak the GMAT’s language on test day, you’re more likely to get a 1337 score.

Plan on taking the GMAT soon? We have GMAT prep courses starting all the time. And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!

Ron Awad is a GMAT instructor for Veritas Prep based in Montreal, bringing you weekly advice for success on your exam.  After graduating from McGill and receiving his MBA from Concordia, Ron started teaching GMAT prep and his Veritas Prep students have given him rave reviews ever since.
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Prospective Student Days for MBA-Bound Military Veterans [#permalink]

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FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Prospective Student Days for MBA-Bound Military Veterans
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Each year military veterans typically make up around 5% of the incoming classes as top MBA programs in the U.S., making veterans an important demographic for business schools. Prospective military applicants have a secret weapon for business school applications not available to applicants from other industries:  armed forces clubs. These clubs are a great way to learn more about individual programs in addition to providing a wealth of insider information. Whether you are just beginning your b-school research or planning on submitting applications this season, one of the first things I recommend to all military applicants is to reach out to these clubs.

Some schools have a central contact point while others, like Fuqua, go as far as listing the names of all their current students who are veterans, along with their contact information. Regardless of how you connect with these clubs and their members, you’ll find they are more than willing to help you answer questions and chat about their experience as veterans. You will also get a sense of what programs may be the best fit for you as a result of interacting with members of the current class.

If your schedule allows, go one step further and take advantage of the military prospective student events being held around the country at business schools this fall.  Military visit days are typically daylong sessions complete with admissions FAQ sessions, campus tours, class visits and the opportunity to network with current students.

Of the top ten MBA programs in the U.S., seven hold a yearly military day event.  While the majority of these days happen between September and November, Tuck and MIT host their military day events in the spring.  Here’s a rundown of the military events at top programs this fall to put on your radar screen:

HBS Military Prospective Student Day, September 26

http://hbs.campusgroups.com/afaa/home/

Wharton Veteran Prospective Applicant Day, September 25

http://whartonveterans.org

NYU Stern Military Event, Saturday October 4

By invitation only, deadline has passed to apply.

http://www.stern.nyu.edu/programs-admissions/full-time-mba/students/military-veterans/military-event

Duke Veteran’s Symposium for Military Applicants, October 10-11

https://events.fuqua.duke.edu/veterans/

Kellogg Military Visit Day, October 17-18 http://kellogg.campusgroups.com/veterans/web_page?url_name=about&club_url2=veterans

Columbia, Veterans Matter@ Columbia Event, November 10

http://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/programs-admissions/why-a-columbia-mba/community/diversity-columbia/veterans

Cornell Military Preview Day, November 13, 2014

https://www.johnson.cornell.edu/About/Veterans-at-Johnson/Military-Preview-Day

Michigan Ross Military Preview Day, November 15

https://michiganross.umich.edu/events/military-preview-day

All of these events, with the exception of Stern, which is by invitation only, are open to anyone with a military background. Whether you are active duty and just beginning to research business school or a veteran already planning on R2 applications, attending these tailored events and reaching out to Armed Forces Clubs will give you a strategic advantage in the application process. For the events that have passed, keep these in mind if you plan to apply next year!

Emily Sawyer Kegerreis is a Head Consultant at Veritas Prep and specializes in the career development needs of transitioning military veterans through her company, CareerWise Consulting.
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The Best Strategy for Completing Your MBA Applications [#permalink]

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FROM Veritas Prep Blog: The Best Strategy for Completing Your MBA Applications
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The stress of any approaching deadline causes some degree of anxiety, but if the task is something of monumental importance such as your application to business school, the anxiety can be downright debilitating.  Managing your schedule in a way which leaves you not only enough time to create a fantastic application but also enough time to do your day job can be tough.

Even with the recent trend of shorter essays for schools, it still takes quite a bit of thoughtfulness to craft a compelling case for admission, and this thoughtfulness takes time—plain and simple.  Essays are not going to write themselves, not to mention all the ancillary items you must also complete such as obtaining your transcripts, sitting down with recommenders and going on school visits.

It’s probably not too much trouble to pull everything off if you are applying to only one or two schools, but if you decide to cast a wider net in order to boost your odds, you might find yourself with five or six applications to knock out.

So what is the strategy?

1. Why an MBA?

Since every school wants to know some version of three basic questions, a good way to get the process rolling is to think about why you want an MBA at all, why now is the right time, and why your specific target schools appeal to you (hint: don’t mention the rankings).

2. Get Organized

Organizing yourself is also important.  Make sure you set aside time specifically for application work, or else you might fall into the procrastination trap.  Unfortunately, trying to do things piecemeal is typically a recipe for disaster, so plan to work in at least half-hour to one hour chunks if you want to make meaningful progress.

3. One at a Time

Another tip is to try and work on only one school at a time.  This achieves two things; firstly, it prevents you from getting confused about the reasons for going to each school and helps you focus on the details of individual school requirements.  Secondly, it gives you a nice feeling of achievement when you are able to complete a school in its entirety, which can provide critical momentum (especially if you are running out of time).

Of course some of the heavy lifting you must do on b-school applications is completely transferrable, such as getting copies of transcripts, sending your GMAT scores, and lining up recommenders, but the school specific list is something that is best accomplished if you focus on that school only until you are finished.

4. Submit Your Best

The last piece of advice I have is to make sure you create the best application you can before you hit the submit button.  Even though the process can be arduous at times, don’t succumb to the pressure of a deadline to potentially put you in a situation to submit something that could be better if you only had more time.  Better to bump into a subsequent round with an improved package, than to hit an earlier deadline having left things on the table.

Learn about top MBA programs by downloading our Essential Guides! Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or click here to take our Free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter.

Bryant Michaels has over 25 years of professional post undergraduate experience in the entertainment industry as well as on Wall Street with Goldman Sachs. He served on the admissions committee at the Fuqua School of Business where he received his MBA and now works part time in retirement for a top tier business school. He has been consulting with Veritas Prep clients for the past six admissions seasons. See more of his articles here.
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GMAT Tip of the Week: Sentence Correction in Real Life [#permalink]

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FROM Veritas Prep Blog: GMAT Tip of the Week: Sentence Correction in Real Life
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Totes McGotes. FML. Sorry for partying. I know, right? Of the common phrases that have permeated pop culture and everyday conversation, easily one of the most common is, wait for it…

Wait for it.

And that one phrase can totes make your GMAT score supes high. Like, for real.

How?

Perhaps the best example comes from an all-staff email sent at Veritas Prep headquarters this week regarding the holiday vacation schedule. It began “With pumpkin spice season nearing its apex, it’s…” Seeing that introduction, multiple Veritas Prep staffers commented later that “it’s” after the comma made them nervous, as the possessive of “season” is its, not it’s (which grammatically means “it is”).

Now later in that sentence it became clear that the intention was “it is” (…”it’s time to start making holiday vacation plans.”), but the fact that so many Sentence Correction experts were on the edge of their seats just seeing that contraction “it’s” next to a possessive should demonstrate for you how to become great at Sentence Correction. To be efficient and effective with Sentence Correction, it’s helpful to anticipate what types of errors you might see, rather than simply sit back and wait for them to appear. Those who are most successful at Sentence Correction read sentences looking for signs of potential danger; they’re proactive as they search for likely Decision Points. For example, if you were to read the introduction:

Particularly for a leadership or management role, it is important that a candidate be both…

your senses should be heightened for parallel structure with “both X and Y,” number one, and secondly you should be acutely aware that the word “be” precedes the word “both,” so there is a very high likelihood that there will be an extraneous “be” after the word “and” to follow. In other words, when you see “both,” wait for it…where’s the “and,” and is the portion directly after it parallel to the first portion?

Correct:

(A) qualified to perform the duties of most subordinates and able to inspire subordinates to perform those duties at a higher level.

Incorrect:

(B) qualified to perform the duties of most subordinates and be able to inspire subordinates to perform those duties at a higher level.

While the grammar of this problem is crucial, true expertise comes from knowing where to focus your attention and expend your mental energy. Analyzing every word of every answer choice is exhausting, so the experts train themselves to see clues and “…wait for it” focusing back in on the parts of the sentence most highly correlated with errors. Clues can be:

Signals of parallel structure: both, either, neither, not only

Signals of verb tense: since, from, until

Signals of pronoun or subject/verb agreement: it, they, its, their

To train yourself to spot those clues that tell you to “wait for it…”, pay attention not only (wait for it…) to the grammatical reasons that an answer choice is right or wrong in your homework, but also (here it is…is it parallel?) to the signals outside the underline that required the application of that grammar. Sentence Correction is to an extent about “what do you know” but to really excel it also has to be about “what do you do” – the clues and signals that tell you what to look for and where to spend your time and energy.

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A 750 Level GMAT Question on Statistics! [#permalink]

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FROM Veritas Prep Blog: A 750 Level GMAT Question on Statistics!
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Today, we have a very interesting statistics question for you. We have already discussed statistics concepts such as mean, median, range etc in our QWQW series. Check them out here if you haven’t already done so:

The Meaning of Arithmetic Mean

Can You Solve these Mean GMAT Questions?

Finding Arithmetic Mean Using Deviations

Application of Arithmetic Means

Mean Questions on Median

A Range of Questions

This question needs you to apply all these concepts but can still be easily done in under two minutes. Now, without further ado, let’s go on to the question – there is a lot to discuss there.

Question: An automated manufacturing unit employs N experts. Their average monthly salary is $7000 while the median monthly salary is only $5000. If the range of their monthly salaries is $10,000, what is the minimum value of N?

(A)10

(B)12

(C)14

(D)15

(E)20

Solution: Let’s first assimilate the information we have. We need to find the minimum number of experts that must be there. Why should there be a minimum number of people satisfying these statistics? Let’s try to understand that with some numbers.

Say, N cannot be 1 i.e. there cannot be a single expert in the unit because then you cannot have the range of $10,000. You need at least two people to have a range – the difference of their salaries would be the range in that case.

So there are at least 2 people – say one with salary 0 and the other with 10,000. No salary will lie outside this range.

Median is $5000 – i.e. when all salaries are listed in increasing order, the middle salary (or average of middle two) is $5000. With 2 people, one at 0 and the other at 10,000, the median will be the average of the two i.e. (0 + 10,000)/2 = $5000. Since there are at least 10 people, there is probably someone earning $5000. Let’s put in 5000 there for reference.

0 … 5000 … 10,000

Arithmetic mean of all the salaries is $7000. Now, mean of 0, 5000 and 10,000 is $5000, not $7000 so this means that we need to add some more people. We need to add them more toward 10,000 than toward 0 to get a higher mean. So we will try to get a mean of $7000.

Let’s use deviations from the mean method to find where we need to add more people.

0 is 7000 less than 7000 and 5000 is 2000 less than 7000 which means we have a total of $9000 less than 7000. On the other hand, 10,000 is 3000 more than 7000. The deviations on the two sides of mean do not balance out. To balance, we need to add two more people at a salary of $10,000 so that the total deviation on the right of 7000 is also $9000. Note that since we need the minimum number of experts, we should add new people at 10,000 so that they quickly make up the deficit in the deviation. If we add them at 8000 or 9000 etc, we will need to add more people to make up the deficit at the right.

Now we have

0 … 5000 … 10000, 10000, 10000

Now the mean is 7000 but note that the median has gone awry. It is 10,000 now instead of the 5000 that is required. So we will need to add more people at 5000 to bring the median back to 5000. But that will disturb our mean again! So when we add some people at 5000, we will need to add some at 10,000 too to keep the mean at 7000.

5000 is 2000 less than 7000 and 10,000 is 3000 more than 7000. We don’t want to disturb the total deviation from 7000. So every time we add 3 people at 5000 (which will be a total deviation of 6000 less than 7000), we will need to add 2 people at 10,000 (which will be a total deviation of 6000 more than 7000), to keep the mean at 7000 – this is the most important step. Ensure that you have understood this before moving ahead.

When we add 3 people at 5000 and 2 at 10,000, we are in effect adding an extra person at 5000 and hence it moves our median a bit to the left.

Let’s try one such set of addition:

0 … 5000, 5000, 5000, 5000 … 10000, 10000, 10000, 10000, 10000

The median is not $5000 yet. Let’s try one more set of addition.

0 … 5000, 5000, 5000, 5000, 5000, 5000, 5000 … 10000, 10000, 10000, 10000, 10000, 10000, 10000

The median now is $5000 and we have maintained the mean at $7000.

This gives us a total of 15 people.

Answer (D)

Granted, the question is tough but note that it uses very basic concepts and that is the hallmark of a good GMAT question!

Try to come up with some other methods of solving this.

Karishma, a Computer Engineer with a keen interest in alternative Mathematical approaches, has mentored students in the continents of Asia, Europe and North America. She teaches the GMAT for Veritas Prep in Detroit, Michigan, and regularly participates in content development projects such as this blog!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Marisa

Veritas Prep | Veritas Prep Representative

Save $100 on live Veritas Prep GMAT Courses

Veritas Prep Reviews

Kudos [?]: 167 [1], given: 2

A 750 Level GMAT Question on Statistics!   [#permalink] 20 Oct 2014, 09:00

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