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We commonly speak of aesthetic judgments as subjective, and

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We commonly speak of aesthetic judgments as subjective, and [#permalink]

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New post 14 Nov 2008, 05:36
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We commonly speak of aesthetic judgments as subjective, and in the short term they are, since critics often disagree about the value of a particular contemporary work of art. But over time, the subjective element disappears. When works of art have continued to delight audiences for centuries, as have the paintings of Michelangelo, the music of Bach, and the plays of Shakespeare, we can objectively call them great.
The statements above best support which of the following conclusions?
(A) When Michelangelo, Bach, and Shakespeare were alive, critics disagreed about the value of their work.
(B) The value of a contemporary work of art cannot be objectively measured.
(C) The reputation of a work of art often fluctuates greatly from one generation to the next.
(D) The mere fact that a work of art has endured for centuries does not establish its greatness.
(E) If critics agree about the value of a particular cotemporary work of art, then the work can objectively be called great

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Re: CR: Piece of art [#permalink]

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New post 14 Nov 2008, 07:06
Answer B.The statement says that works of art can be objectively called only if they consistently continue delight people of all ages.
Out of all the options , B is the only correct answer that will be supported by the statement.

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Re: CR: Piece of art [#permalink]

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New post 14 Nov 2008, 09:31
A

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Re: CR: Piece of art [#permalink]

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New post 14 Nov 2008, 13:04
i think it shud be E

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Re: CR: Piece of art [#permalink]

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New post 14 Nov 2008, 13:23
Only B makes sense here.


prasun84 wrote:
We commonly speak of aesthetic judgments as subjective, and in the short term they are, since critics often disagree about the value of a particular contemporary work of art. But over time, the subjective element disappears. When works of art have continued to delight audiences for centuries, as have the paintings of Michelangelo, the music of Bach, and the plays of Shakespeare, we can objectively call them great.
The statements above best support which of the following conclusions?
(A) When Michelangelo, Bach, and Shakespeare were alive, critics disagreed about the value of their work.
(B) The value of a contemporary work of art cannot be objectively measured.
(C) The reputation of a work of art often fluctuates greatly from one generation to the next.
(D) The mere fact that a work of art has endured for centuries does not establish its greatness.
(E) If critics agree about the value of a particular cotemporary work of art, then the work can objectively be called great

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Re: CR: Piece of art [#permalink]

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New post 14 Nov 2008, 13:56
B as well.

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Re: CR: Piece of art [#permalink]

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New post 16 Nov 2008, 20:03
Another E

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Re: CR: Piece of art [#permalink]

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New post 17 Nov 2008, 06:05
B it is
prasun84 wrote:
We commonly speak of aesthetic judgments as subjective, and in the short term they are, since critics often disagree about the value of a particular contemporary work of art. But over time, the subjective element disappears. When works of art have continued to delight audiences for centuries, as have the paintings of Michelangelo, the music of Bach, and the plays of Shakespeare, we can objectively call them great.
The statements above best support which of the following conclusions?
(A) When Michelangelo, Bach, and Shakespeare were alive, critics disagreed about the value of their work.
(B) The value of a contemporary work of art cannot be objectively measured.
(C) The reputation of a work of art often fluctuates greatly from one generation to the next.
(D) The mere fact that a work of art has endured for centuries does not establish its greatness.
(E) If critics agree about the value of a particular cotemporary work of art, then the work can objectively be called great

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Re: CR: Piece of art [#permalink]

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New post 17 Nov 2008, 14:45
IMO B. OA Please.
We cannot say about A,C and D, as these are outside information.
and it says that for any art to be great it need to stand the test of time. :)
Only B supports it.
ritula wrote:
B it is
prasun84 wrote:
We commonly speak of aesthetic judgments as subjective, and in the short term they are, since critics often disagree about the value of a particular contemporary work of art. But over time, the subjective element disappears. When works of art have continued to delight audiences for centuries, as have the paintings of Michelangelo, the music of Bach, and the plays of Shakespeare, we can objectively call them great.
The statements above best support which of the following conclusions?
(A) When Michelangelo, Bach, and Shakespeare were alive, critics disagreed about the value of their work.
(B) The value of a contemporary work of art cannot be objectively measured.
(C) The reputation of a work of art often fluctuates greatly from one generation to the next.
(D) The mere fact that a work of art has endured for centuries does not establish its greatness.
(E) If critics agree about the value of a particular cotemporary work of art, then the work can objectively be called great

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Re: CR: Piece of art [#permalink]

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New post 17 Nov 2008, 14:57
Hi guys,

IMO E

(A) When Michelangelo, Bach, and Shakespeare were alive, critics disagreed about the value of their work. this is not a conclusion
(B) The value of a contemporary work of art cannot be objectively measured. extreme answer: discarded. Also, the text says that experts often disagree...
(C) The reputation of a work of art often fluctuates greatly from one generation to the next. the text doesn't say anything about fluctuating
(D) The mere fact that a work of art has endured for centuries does not establish its greatness. this weakens the argument
(E) If critics agree about the value of a particular cotemporary work of art, then the work can objectively be called great Hold

OA?

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Re: CR: Piece of art [#permalink]

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New post 17 Nov 2008, 16:19
I went for E.

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Re: CR: Piece of art [#permalink]

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New post 17 Nov 2008, 19:47
We commonly speak of aesthetic judgments as subjective, and in the short term they are, since critics often disagree about the value of a particular contemporary work of art. But over time, the subjective element disappears. When works of art have continued to delight audiences for centuries, as have the paintings of Michelangelo, the music of Bach, and the plays of Shakespeare, we can objectively call them great.

(1)Critics Disagree --> Subjective
Not Subjective --> Critics DO NOT Disagree

(2)Delights Audiences LT --> Objective/Great
Not Objective/Great --> Not Delight Audiences LT

The statements above best support which of the following conclusions?

(A) When Michelangelo, Bach, and Shakespeare were alive, critics disagreed about the value of their work.
Eliminate: We cannot assume this. This is a necessary condition. There are other ways (sufficient conditions) to ensure that their work can be deemed objectively great.
(B) The value of a contemporary work of art cannot be objectively measured.
Matches (1). My choice. IF the critics disagree about about the value of a contemporary piece of art (because they do in the short-term) THEN the aesthetic judgment is subjective (aka Not Objective).
(C) The reputation of a work of art often fluctuates greatly from one generation to the next.
Eliminate: Too strong. Makes an unwarranted prediction/statement "often".
(D) The mere fact that a work of art has endured for centuries does not establish its greatness.
Eliminate: Scope shift. We're discussing criteria for subjectivity and objectivity. This is discussing greatness in general.
(E) If critics agree about the value of a particular contemporary work of art, then the work can objectively be called great
Eliminate: Cannot infer anything from this statement. Critics not disagreeing is merely a necessary condition for the CP of (1).

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Re: CR: Piece of art [#permalink]

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New post 18 Nov 2008, 01:53
thanx guys..OA is B.

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Re: CR: Piece of art [#permalink]

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New post 18 Nov 2008, 02:26
prasun84 wrote:
thanx guys..OA is B.


Thanks!

What's the source of the question?

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Re: CR: Piece of art [#permalink]

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New post 18 Nov 2008, 16:11
yep! B is correct.

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Re: CR: Piece of art   [#permalink] 18 Nov 2008, 16:11
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