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Re: When Elizabeth Cady Stanton composed the Declaration of Sentiments in [#permalink]
zxwhud wrote:
I’m confused the answer A “it” refer to
I think the first it refer to the “ that he would have to leave town” and the second it refer to “Declaration of Sentiments“ . The it refer to different item, is there any problem with pronoun?

Please think again what the first IT could refer to.

See what becomes of the sentence if we substitute what you suggested:
Quote:
When Elizabeth Cady Stanton composed the Declaration of Sentiments in the early 1840s, her husband stated that that he would have to leave town was so bold that he would have to leave town if she read The Declaration of Sentiments at the Seneca Falls Convention, a landmark event in the women's rights movement in the US.

Whether we look at grammar or meaning, does this version of the sentence work? Is this even a proper sentence?

The grammar rule is that IT should refer to a singular noun. (Except in sentences such as 'It is difficult to remember all the rules': here the IT does not refer to anything).

A second grammar rule is that if we replace the IT with the item to which it refers, we should still have a sentence.

From the meaning point of view, the substitution should make sense. Does it make sense to say that 'he would have to leave town was so bold that he would have to leave town'?


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Re: When Elizabeth Cady Stanton composed the Declaration of Sentiments in [#permalink]
vv65 wrote:
zxwhud wrote:
I’m confused the answer A “it” refer to
I think the first it refer to the “ that he would have to leave town” and the second it refer to “Declaration of Sentiments“ . The it refer to different item, is there any problem with pronoun?

Please think again what the first IT could refer to.

See what becomes of the sentence if we substitute what you suggested:
Quote:
When Elizabeth Cady Stanton composed the Declaration of Sentiments in the early 1840s, her husband stated that that he would have to leave town was so bold that he would have to leave town if she read The Declaration of Sentiments at the Seneca Falls Convention, a landmark event in the women's rights movement in the US.

Whether we look at grammar or meaning, does this version of the sentence work? Is this even a proper sentence?

The grammar rule is that IT should refer to a singular noun. (Except in sentences such as 'It is difficult to remember all the rules': here the IT does not refer to anything).

A second grammar rule is that if we replace the IT with the item to which it refers, we should still have a sentence.

From the meaning point of view, the substitution should make sense. Does it make sense to say that 'he would have to leave town was so bold that he would have to leave town'?


Posted from my mobile device


thanks for replying.
I thought "it" refer to the that-clause. so the first "it" doesn't stand for any noun?
if the clause is presented [ it's adj. that.... ], that-clause is the subject of the sentence. If i can say i can ignore the it ?
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Re: When Elizabeth Cady Stanton composed the Declaration of Sentiments in [#permalink]
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zxwhud wrote:
I thought "it" refer to the that-clause. so the first "it" doesn't stand for any noun?

It does! In this question, the first 'IT' does stand for a singular noun.

Except in sentences of the type 'It is adjective...', 'IT' should refer to a singular noun.

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When Elizabeth Cady Stanton composed the Declaration of Sentiments in [#permalink]
zxwhud wrote:
if the clause is presented [ it's adj. that.... ], that-clause is the subject of the sentence.

I said this is a SC rule: IT must refer to a singular noun.

And I mentioned an exception to the rule.
Here is an example of the exception: "It is difficult to remember all the rules".
The 'IT' does not stand for anything. The verb in the sentence is 'IS'. The subject is "to remember all the rules". Because the sentence can be rewritten as "To remember all the rules is difficult".

Here is another example: It is clear that the GMAT is difficult.
Again, the IT is a dummy that does not refer to anything. The subject is 'that the GMAT is difficult'.

But, but, but ... the Elizabeth Stanton SC question we are discussing does not fit in this exception category. Every IT in the sentence refers to a singular noun.

Quote:
If i can say i can ignore the it ?
Sorry, but I don't understand the question :?

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Re: When Elizabeth Cady Stanton composed the Declaration of Sentiments in [#permalink]
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vv65 wrote:
zxwhud wrote:
I thought "it" refer to the that-clause. so the first "it" doesn't stand for any noun?

It does! In this question, the first 'IT' does stand for a singular noun.

Except in sentences of the type 'It is adjective...', 'IT' should refer to a singular noun.

Posted from my mobile device


oh,I see. I misunderstood the meaning.
two IT here refer to "Declaration of Sentiments"
thank you very much.
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Re: When Elizabeth Cady Stanton composed the Declaration of Sentiments in [#permalink]
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