It is currently 17 Dec 2017, 19:37

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

A chef mixes P ounces of 60% sugar solution with Q ounces of a 10% sug

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 42653

Kudos [?]: 135991 [1], given: 12719

A chef mixes P ounces of 60% sugar solution with Q ounces of a 10% sug [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Mar 2015, 06:03
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
16
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  55% (hard)

Question Stats:

56% (00:53) correct 44% (01:17) wrong based on 428 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

A chef mixes P ounces of 60% sugar solution with Q ounces of a 10% sugar solution to produce R ounces of a 25% sugar solution. What is the value of P?

(1) Q = 455 mL
(2) R = 650 mL


Kudos for a correct solution.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

_________________

New to the Math Forum?
Please read this: Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread | All You Need for Quant | PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

Resources:
GMAT Math Book | Triangles | Polygons | Coordinate Geometry | Factorials | Circles | Number Theory | Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets | PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders | GMAT Prep Software Analysis | SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) | Tricky questions from previous years.

Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
Extra-hard Quant Tests with Brilliant Analytics

Kudos [?]: 135991 [1], given: 12719

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 31 May 2013
Posts: 11

Kudos [?]: 6 [0], given: 1

Re: A chef mixes P ounces of 60% sugar solution with Q ounces of a 10% sug [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Mar 2015, 09:05
IMO answer should be A

1)statement 1 :-q=455
Let x amount of P is added then , sugar and water are(0.6x and 0.4x respectively

amount of sugar in q is known 10 percent of 455
amount of sugar in p is 0.6x

total in R:- 45.5+0.6x
also total fluid is :-455+x

ratio of sugar is given:-25%
so 45.5+0.6x=(455+x) *0.25
x can be found out hence sufficeint

2) statment 2 says amount of sugar is known but p and q can be any ratio , hence not sufficient

Kudos [?]: 6 [0], given: 1

Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 25 May 2014
Posts: 24

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 171

Schools: Sauder '18 (A)
GPA: 3.1
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: A chef mixes P ounces of 60% sugar solution with Q ounces of a 10% sug [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Mar 2015, 12:25
Forming equation based on the question stem-

0.60P + 0.10Q = 0.25R (eqn1)

OR, 0.60P + 0.10Q = 0.25(P+Q) (As, R=P+Q) (eqn2)

We need to find the value of "P"

1) Q=455ml
Hence, using eqn (2), we can find the value of P.
Therefore, 1 sufficient.

2) R=660ml
Even by substituting the value of R in any of the above equations, we cannot get the value of P or Q.
Therefore 2, insufficient

Hence, Answer "A"

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 171

Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
EMPOWERgmat Instructor
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT Assassin/Co-Founder
Affiliations: EMPOWERgmat
Joined: 19 Dec 2014
Posts: 10425

Kudos [?]: 3700 [1], given: 173

Location: United States (CA)
GMAT 1: 800 Q51 V49
GRE 1: 340 Q170 V170
Re: A chef mixes P ounces of 60% sugar solution with Q ounces of a 10% sug [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Mar 2015, 22:13
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
4
This post was
BOOKMARKED
Hi All,

You have to be very careful about your assumptions with this question. You will likely find that doing a little bit of extra work will help you to be sure that you have the correct answer.

From the prompt, we know that we're mixing P ounces of a 60% sugar solution with Q ounces of a 10% sugar solution to form R ounces of a 25% sugar solution. We're asked for the value of P....

Before dealing with the two Facts, I'm going to set up a "weighted average" equation using the above information....

(.6P + .1Q)/(P+Q) = .25

.6P + .1Q = .25P + .25Q
.35P = .15Q
35P = 15Q

P/Q = 15/35 = 3/7 This means that for every 3 ounces of P, we have 7 ounces of Q. However, we don't yet know the exact number of ounces of each we have....

We also know that R = P+Q

Looking at this from an algebraic standpoint, we have 3 variables and 2 equations.....

Fact 1: Q = 455

With this value, and the given ratio for P/Q, we CAN answer the question.
Fact 1 is SUFFICIENT

Fact 2: R = 660

Since we know that R = P+Q and the ratio of P/Q = 3/7, we CAN answer the question. Here's how...

With the given ratio, for every 3 ounces of P, we have 7 ounces of Q. In basic terms, that means that every 10 ounces is 3 ounces of P and 7 ounces of Q. With a total of 660 ounces, we have 66(3) = 198 ounces of P and 66(7) = 462 ounces of Q.
Fact 2 is SUFFICIENT

Final Answer:
[Reveal] Spoiler:
D


GMAT assassins aren't born, they're made,
Rich
_________________

760+: Learn What GMAT Assassins Do to Score at the Highest Levels
Contact Rich at: Rich.C@empowergmat.com

Rich Cohen

Co-Founder & GMAT Assassin

Special Offer: Save $75 + GMAT Club Tests Free
  Official GMAT Exam Packs + 70 Pt. Improvement Guarantee
www.empowergmat.com/

***********************Select EMPOWERgmat Courses now include ALL 6 Official GMAC CATs!***********************

Kudos [?]: 3700 [1], given: 173

Expert Post
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 42653

Kudos [?]: 135991 [0], given: 12719

Re: A chef mixes P ounces of 60% sugar solution with Q ounces of a 10% sug [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Mar 2015, 15:08
Expert's post
2
This post was
BOOKMARKED
Bunuel wrote:
A chef mixes P ounces of 60% sugar solution with Q ounces of a 10% sugar solution to produce R ounces of a 25% sugar solution. What is the value of P?

(1) Q = 455 mL
(2) R = 660 mL


Kudos for a correct solution.


MAGOOSH OFFICIAL SOLUTION:

This one is very elegant. We have three variables — the amount of 60% sugar solution, the amount of 15% sugar solution, and the amount of the resultant 25% sugar solution. Three variables. We have two equations: the volume equation and the concentration equation. Right now, three variables and two equations: we can’t solve.

Now, look at the statements. Each statement gives us the value of one of the variables. If we get the value of one variable, that’s no longer a variable, and thus we are down to two variables with two equations: that’s a situation in which we can find a full solution. Thus, given the value of either Q or R, we enter a situation in which we can solve for everything, and thus we would know P. Therefore, each statement, by itself, is sufficient.

Answer = D
_________________

New to the Math Forum?
Please read this: Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread | All You Need for Quant | PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

Resources:
GMAT Math Book | Triangles | Polygons | Coordinate Geometry | Factorials | Circles | Number Theory | Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets | PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders | GMAT Prep Software Analysis | SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) | Tricky questions from previous years.

Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
Extra-hard Quant Tests with Brilliant Analytics

Kudos [?]: 135991 [0], given: 12719

1 KUDOS received
Director
Director
User avatar
G
Joined: 23 Jan 2013
Posts: 602

Kudos [?]: 32 [1], given: 41

Schools: Cambridge'16
Re: A chef mixes P ounces of 60% sugar solution with Q ounces of a 10% sug [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Mar 2015, 21:25
1
This post received
KUDOS
60%---------------------25%----------10%

35p=15q

p/q=15/35=3/7

what is the value of P?

St.1 Q=455, so P=(3/7)*455. SUFF

St.2 R=660, so P=(3/10)*660. SUFF

D

one notice is that to be consistent, R in the second statement should be 650

Kudos [?]: 32 [1], given: 41

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Status: A mind once opened never loses..!
Joined: 05 Mar 2015
Posts: 222

Kudos [?]: 132 [0], given: 259

Location: India
MISSION : 800
WE: Design (Manufacturing)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: A chef mixes P ounces of 60% sugar solution with Q ounces of a 10% sug [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Mar 2015, 04:33
0.6P + 0.10Q = 0.25(P+Q)

Statement i tell Q hence sufficient

Now Statement ii tells P+Q = 660

Now we have two equations and two variable. can be solved Sufficient
_________________

Thank you

+KUDOS

> I CAN, I WILL <

Kudos [?]: 132 [0], given: 259

Board of Directors
User avatar
P
Joined: 17 Jul 2014
Posts: 2698

Kudos [?]: 451 [0], given: 209

Location: United States (IL)
Concentration: Finance, Economics
GMAT 1: 650 Q49 V30
GPA: 3.92
WE: General Management (Transportation)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: A chef mixes P ounces of 60% sugar solution with Q ounces of a 10% sug [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Oct 2016, 06:01
Bunuel wrote:
A chef mixes P ounces of 60% sugar solution with Q ounces of a 10% sugar solution to produce R ounces of a 25% sugar solution. What is the value of P?

(1) Q = 455 mL
(2) R = 660 mL


Kudos for a correct solution.


I started with a matrix chart...
P=0.6P(sugar) + 0.4P(other stuff)
Q=0.1Q(sugar) + 0.9Q(other stuff)
now:
0.6P+0.1Q=0.25R
and
0.4P+0.9Q=0.75R

multiply first one by 3:
1.8P+0.3Q=0.4P+0.9Q
or
1.2P=0.6Q -> multiply everything by 10
12P=6Q -> divide by 6
2P=Q
so to find P, we need either value of Q, or value of R.

1. we have value for Q - sufficient
2. we have value for R - sufficient.

D is the answer.

Kudos [?]: 451 [0], given: 209

1 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 20 Sep 2015
Posts: 22

Kudos [?]: 6 [1], given: 46

Re: A chef mixes P ounces of 60% sugar solution with Q ounces of a 10% sug [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Sep 2017, 00:30
1
This post received
KUDOS
Bunuel, There is a mistake in the Question.

For both statements to give a consistent solution, R should be 650 and not 660.

Please edit.

Kudos [?]: 6 [1], given: 46

Expert Post
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 42653

Kudos [?]: 135991 [0], given: 12719

Re: A chef mixes P ounces of 60% sugar solution with Q ounces of a 10% sug [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Sep 2017, 00:36

Kudos [?]: 135991 [0], given: 12719

Re: A chef mixes P ounces of 60% sugar solution with Q ounces of a 10% sug   [#permalink] 13 Sep 2017, 00:36
Display posts from previous: Sort by

A chef mixes P ounces of 60% sugar solution with Q ounces of a 10% sug

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.