GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 17 Feb 2019, 20:29

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in February
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
272829303112
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
242526272812
Open Detailed Calendar
  • Free GMAT Algebra Webinar

     February 17, 2019

     February 17, 2019

     07:00 AM PST

     09:00 AM PST

    Attend this Free Algebra Webinar and learn how to master Inequalities and Absolute Value problems on GMAT.
  • Valentine's day SALE is on! 25% off.

     February 18, 2019

     February 18, 2019

     10:00 PM PST

     11:00 PM PST

    We don’t care what your relationship status this year - we love you just the way you are. AND we want you to crush the GMAT!

A mathematical theorem proved by one mathematician should not

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

 
Manager
Manager
avatar
P
Joined: 12 Feb 2014
Posts: 82
Location: India
Schools: LBS MIF '19
GMAT 1: 730 Q50 V40
GPA: 3.3
A mathematical theorem proved by one mathematician should not  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Jan 2017, 10:50
2
10
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  35% (medium)

Question Stats:

71% (02:20) correct 29% (02:34) wrong based on 268 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

A mathematical theorem proved by one mathematician should not be accepted until each step in its proof has been independently verified. Computer-assisted proofs generally proceed by conducting a vast number of calculations—surveying all the possible types of instances in which the theorem could apply and proving that the theorem holds for each type. In most computer-assisted proofs there are astronomically many types of instances to survey, and no human being could review every step in the proof. Hence, computer-assisted proofs involving astronomically many types of instances should not be accepted.

Which one of the following is an assumption on which the argument relies?

(A) The use of the computer to assist in the proof of mathematical theorems has greatly simplified the mathematician's task.
(B) Most attempts to construct proofs of mathematical theorems do not result in demonstrations that the theorems are true.
(C) Computers cannot be used to assist in generating proofs of mathematical theorems that involve only a very limited number of steps.
(D) Any mathematical proof that does not rely on the computer cannot proceed by surveying all possible types of instances to which the candidate theorem might apply.
(E) The use of an independent computer program does not satisfy the requirement for independent verification of each step in a proof that is extended enough to be otherwise unverifiable.
Director
Director
avatar
P
Joined: 14 Nov 2014
Posts: 628
Location: India
GMAT 1: 700 Q50 V34
GPA: 3.76
Re: A mathematical theorem proved by one mathematician should not  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Jan 2017, 00:40
rs47 wrote:
A mathematical theorem proved by one mathematician should not be accepted until each step in its proof has been independently verified. Computer-assisted proofs generally proceed by conducting a vast number of calculations—surveying all the possible types of instances in which the theorem could apply and proving that the theorem holds for each type. In most computer-assisted proofs there are astronomically many types of instances to survey, and no human being could review every step in the proof. Hence, computer-assisted proofs involving astronomically many types of instances should not be accepted.

Which one of the following is an assumption on which the argument relies?

(A) The use of the computer to assist in the proof of mathematical theorems has greatly simplified the mathematician's task.
(B) Most attempts to construct proofs of mathematical theorems do not result in demonstrations that the theorems are true.
(C) Computers cannot be used to assist in generating proofs of mathematical theorems that involve only a very limited number of steps.
(D) Any mathematical proof that does not rely on the computer cannot proceed by surveying all possible types of instances to which the candidate theorem might apply.
(E) The use of an independent computer program does not satisfy the requirement for independent verification of each step in a proof that is extended enough to be otherwise unverifiable.


In my view:

Argument is telling computer aided prog make the proving of theorem unverifiable as it uses a lot of data and step to prove the theorem that cant be verified by humans. So indirectly comp aided proof become unverifiable .Therefore it does not support the requirement for the proving theorems
So E.
Intern
Intern
User avatar
B
Joined: 26 Jun 2016
Posts: 21
Location: Viet Nam
Concentration: Finance, Entrepreneurship
Schools: Insead Sept'18
GMAT 1: 580 Q48 V23
GPA: 3.25
Re: A mathematical theorem proved by one mathematician should not  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Jan 2017, 02:08
1.Translate/simplify the argument:
- Fact 1: A theorem should be accepted only if each step in its proof has been verified independently
- Fact 2: Computer-assisted proofs work with vast numbers of calculations - (blah blah..surveying instances & proving theorem in each step)
- Fact 3: There are huge number of types of instances, and no one could review all of steps
- Claim: Computer-assisted proofs should not be accepted. (because no one could review all steps!!!)-> Conclusion

2. Quick reasoning (in mind): there is something missed between "independent verification" and "ability of human being". What if there is an alternative way? --> the assumption could eliminate/exclude some possible cases.(which could damage the conclusion)

3. POE:
(A) -> using of computer is not related to the reasoning here ->out of scope
(B) -> attempts to construct proofs blah blah...-> out of scope
(C) -> The argument tell about theorem as a whole, not special case (which involves limited number of steps) -> out of scope
(D) Any mathematical proof that does not rely on the computer cannot proceed by surveying all possible types of instances to which the candidate theorem might apply. ->something has been excluded, not sure it is the correct assumption -> try to negate:
Any proof (non-assisted by computer) can proceed by surveying instances -> so... people still can not review every step in the proof (assisted by computer) --> so... negating this can not damage the conclusion.

(E) The use of an independent computer program does not satisfy the requirement for independent verification of each step in a proof that is extended enough to be otherwise unverifiable. --> oh, it excluded something again -> try to negate:
The use of computer satisfy the requirement for independent verification of each step in a proof (that its extended enough to be otherwise unverifiable) --> yeah, people could not verify it in some cases (or numerous cases), but the fact that computer could satisfy the requirement of independent verification (in that cases) --> definitely destroy the conclusion
--> E is the correct answer

Experts, please correct my reasoning if it is still weak or missing crucial points. Thank you.
Manager
Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 04 Dec 2016
Posts: 54
Location: India
GPA: 3.8
WE: Operations (Other)
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: A mathematical theorem proved by one mathematician should not  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Jan 2017, 02:47
I'm unable to decipher the argument. Please explain in simple terms.
Retired Moderator
User avatar
S
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 2900
Location: Germany
Schools: German MBA
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
WE: Corporate Finance (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: A mathematical theorem proved by one mathematician should not  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Jan 2017, 03:51
2
1
sillyboy wrote:
I'm unable to decipher the argument. Please explain in simple terms.


Once one realizes that in option E, the pronoun "that" refers to "verification", then the question would be easier to comprehend.

Premise: In most computer-assisted proofs there are astronomically many types of instances to survey, and no human being could review every step in the proof.

Conclusion: computer-assisted proofs involving astronomically many types of instances should not be accepted.

The basic link between the premise and conclusion is that human review (verification) is required in order to accept computer-assisted proofs. Option E states this assumption: it is not possible to verify (review by humans) the "extended verification of each step" (by the computer), i.e. the extended verification (by the computer) of each step is otherwise unverifiable (by humans).

(Note that in the phrase "for independent verification of each step in a proof that is extended enough to be otherwise unverifiable", "verification" refers to verification by computers and "unverifiable" refers to review by humans.)

Please post again if you still have doubts.
Non-Human User
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 3634
Premium Member
Re: A mathematical theorem proved by one mathematician should not  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Oct 2018, 09:12
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
_________________

-
April 2018: New Forum dedicated to Verbal Strategies, Guides, and Resources

GMAT Club Bot
Re: A mathematical theorem proved by one mathematician should not   [#permalink] 08 Oct 2018, 09:12
Display posts from previous: Sort by

A mathematical theorem proved by one mathematician should not

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.