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A new satellite sweeping over the poles at altitudes of up to 32,000

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Re: A new satellite sweeping over the poles at altitudes of up to 32,000  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Dec 2019, 12:12
abhimahna wrote:
A new satellite sweeping over the poles at altitudes of up to 32,000 miles is called POLAR, giving scientists their best look yet at the magnetosphere, the region of space under the invisible influence of Earth’s magnetic field.

A. A new satellite sweeping over the poles at altitudes of up to 32,000 miles is called POLAR, giving scientists their best look yet at the magnetosphere, the region of space under the invisible influence of Earth’s magnetic field. --> giving scientists after comma makes the sentence run on. Hence, incorrect.

A new satellite sweeping over the poles at altitudes of up to 32,000 miles is called POLAR, giving scientists their best look yet at the magnetosphere, the region of space under the invisible influence of Earth’s magnetic field.

A new satellite sweeping over the poles at altitudes of up to 32,000 miles is called POLAR, giving scientists their best look yet at the magnetosphere, the region of space under the invisible influence of Earth’s magnetic field.

abhimahna
Here the core is:
A new satellite is called POLAR, giving scientists their best look yet at the magnetosphere.

^^ So, verb+ing (giving) after "comma" is working as "adverbial modifier" not "run-on" at all.
Thank you mate..
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A new satellite sweeping over the poles at altitudes of up to 32,000  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Dec 2019, 12:46
sampriya wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
Quote:
(A) A new satellite sweeping over the poles at altitudes of up to 32,000 miles is called POLAR, giving scientists their best look yet at the magnetosphere, the region of space under the invisible influence of Earth’s magnetic field.

The moment we see that comma + "verb-ing" construction, we know that we're evaluating modifier placement and logic. In this case, "giving" illogically modifies the previous clause. It sounds as though the fact that the satellite is called POLAR somehow gives the scientists a better look at the magnetosphere. While it would be very interesting if a product's name could influence that product's effectiveness, this is certainly not the author's intent. (A) is out.

Quote:
(B) A new satellite called POLAR that is giving scientists their best look yet at the magnetosphere, the region of space under the invisible influence of Earth’s magnetic field, sweeping over the poles at altitudes of up to 32,000 miles.

The noun phrase "A new satellite called POLAR" is followed by a series of modifiers. Because we have no main verb, this is a fragment, and not an actual sentence. Not cool.


Quote:
(C) Scientists are getting their best look yet at the magnetosphere, the region of space under the invisible influence of Earth’s magnetic field, from a new satellite sweeping over the poles at altitudes of up to 32,000 miles called POLAR.

Now it sounds as though it's the the altitudes of 32,000 miles that are called POLAR, rather than the satellite. That's illogical.


Quote:
(D) Sweeping over the poles at altitudes of up to 32,000 miles, a new satellite called POLAR is giving scientists their best look yet at the magnetosphere, the region of space under the invisible influence of Earth’s magnetic field.

No problems here. The initial modifier in red logically modifies the "new satellite." And the ending modifier in blue correctly modifies the "magnetosphere." Looks like we have a contender.

Quote:
(E) Sweeping over the poles at altitudes of up to 32,000 miles, scientists’ best look yet at the magnetosphere, the region of space under the invisible influence of Earth’s magnetic field, is coming from a new satellite called POLAR.


Now it sounds as though "the scientists' best look" is "sweeping over the poles." But that makes no sense: it's the satellite that's sweeping over the poles. (E) is gone, and so (D) is our answer.

I hope that helps!




hi GMATNinja
my question is:

(A) A new satellite sweeping over the poles at altitudes of up to 32,000 miles is called POLAR, giving scientists their best look yet at the magnetosphere, the region of space under the invisible influence of Earth’s magnetic field.

when we have a modifier in a comma pair we know that its not part of the core sentence and therefore can be eliminated, so can we eliminate this sentence also on grounds that "the region of space....field" could be modifying POLAR and that creates an illogical meaning or is it grammatically understood that "the region of space..field" explicitly refers to magnetosphere and no other noun in the sentence?


sampriya

"Modifier" is always kept with the "right side" of "things" unless it is "initial modifier"!

Also, "modifier" should be kept with as closed as possible it is with the "modifying" word.
^^ So, the region of space under the invisible influence of Earth’s magnetic field can't modify "polar" anymore. The the region of space under the invisible influence of Earth’s magnetic field is directly modifying "magnetosphere"; it can't modify other things "simultaneously".

Okay.
Here you go for an example, which helps you to understand whole the things.

sampriya has asked a question on modifier, an easier topic of SC in gmatclub, which has been created by bb.

sampriya has asked a question on modifier, which has been created by bb.

^^ if you delete the an easier topic of SC in gmatclub part, then "modifier" will be created by bb. --> This one does not make sense.

sampriya has asked an SC question on facebook, which has been created by bb.
^^ This will still make sense if which modifies an SC question! I mean: bb creates that SC question!

Thanks__
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Re: A new satellite sweeping over the poles at altitudes of up to 32,000  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Dec 2019, 21:22
sampriya wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
Quote:
(A) A new satellite sweeping over the poles at altitudes of up to 32,000 miles is called POLAR, giving scientists their best look yet at the magnetosphere, the region of space under the invisible influence of Earth’s magnetic field.

The moment we see that comma + "verb-ing" construction, we know that we're evaluating modifier placement and logic. In this case, "giving" illogically modifies the previous clause. It sounds as though the fact that the satellite is called POLAR somehow gives the scientists a better look at the magnetosphere. While it would be very interesting if a product's name could influence that product's effectiveness, this is certainly not the author's intent. (A) is out.

Quote:
(B) A new satellite called POLAR that is giving scientists their best look yet at the magnetosphere, the region of space under the invisible influence of Earth’s magnetic field, sweeping over the poles at altitudes of up to 32,000 miles.

The noun phrase "A new satellite called POLAR" is followed by a series of modifiers. Because we have no main verb, this is a fragment, and not an actual sentence. Not cool.


Quote:
(C) Scientists are getting their best look yet at the magnetosphere, the region of space under the invisible influence of Earth’s magnetic field, from a new satellite sweeping over the poles at altitudes of up to 32,000 miles called POLAR.

Now it sounds as though it's the the altitudes of 32,000 miles that are called POLAR, rather than the satellite. That's illogical.


Quote:
(D) Sweeping over the poles at altitudes of up to 32,000 miles, a new satellite called POLAR is giving scientists their best look yet at the magnetosphere, the region of space under the invisible influence of Earth’s magnetic field.

No problems here. The initial modifier in red logically modifies the "new satellite." And the ending modifier in blue correctly modifies the "magnetosphere." Looks like we have a contender.

Quote:
(E) Sweeping over the poles at altitudes of up to 32,000 miles, scientists’ best look yet at the magnetosphere, the region of space under the invisible influence of Earth’s magnetic field, is coming from a new satellite called POLAR.


Now it sounds as though "the scientists' best look" is "sweeping over the poles." But that makes no sense: it's the satellite that's sweeping over the poles. (E) is gone, and so (D) is our answer.

I hope that helps!




hi GMATNinja
my question is:

(A) A new satellite sweeping over the poles at altitudes of up to 32,000 miles is called POLAR, giving scientists their best look yet at the magnetosphere, the region of space under the invisible influence of Earth’s magnetic field.

when we have a modifier in a comma pair we know that its not part of the core sentence and therefore can be eliminated, so can we eliminate this sentence also on grounds that "the region of space....field" could be modifying POLAR and that creates an illogical meaning or is it grammatically understood that "the region of space..field" explicitly refers to magnetosphere and no other noun in the sentence?

Consider this example: "I gave the money to my friend, a musician who lives in Alaska, the largest and coldest state in the US." (Oddly enough, some of the best Italian food I've ever eaten was in a town of 800 people in rural Alaska. Go figure.)

  • Here, "the largest and coldest state in the US" clearly modifies "Alaska" and "a musician who lives in Alaska" clearly modifies "friend".
  • But if we remove the modifier in the middle, we are left with something that doesn't make any sense: "I gave the money to my friend, the largest state in the US."
  • If we want to eliminate the middle modifier to analyze the "core" of the sentence, then we also have to eliminate anything that modifies the middle modifier!"

Similarly, if you are going to eliminate "giving scientist their best look yet at the magnetosphere", then you also have to get rid of the thing that modifies magnetosphere: "region of space..."

For an explanation of why (A) is wrong, check out this post.

I hope that helps!
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Re: A new satellite sweeping over the poles at altitudes of up to 32,000   [#permalink] 16 Dec 2019, 21:22

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