It is currently 19 Oct 2017, 09:39

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

A Shrewd Undergraduate's guide to HBS admissions

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

3 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 21 Nov 2008
Posts: 14

Kudos [?]: 4 [3], given: 0

A Shrewd Undergraduate's guide to HBS admissions [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Feb 2009, 22:26
3
This post received
KUDOS
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
Thought I would pass this on because I really enjoyed it. I think a lot of the material may apply to other schools besides HBS, as well.

Love,
Agold #2

http://www.thecrimson.com/article.aspx?ref=523161

Kudos [?]: 4 [3], given: 0

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 24 Aug 2008
Posts: 278

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 0

Location: New York City
Schools: Ross, Darden, Yale SOM, Wharton, Kellogg (JD/MBA)
Re: A Shrewd Undergraduate's guide to HBS admissions [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Feb 2009, 22:51
Most of that makes sense, but I have to dissent from this:

"Do not innocently engage in learning for 'learning sake' --although certainly say you do. Do not take introductory Arabic or Chinese because they sound contemporary and important, especially when most kids in those classes will be native speakers looking for guts."

I took plenty of classes just because they sounded interesting. Most of them were. I took Latin simply because I wanted to learn Latin and Shakespeare because I wanted to study the Bard. Your undergraduate career is your time to grow as a person and become academically fulfilled. I know plenty of people who played it safe and only took surefire As and only in classes for their major, but I think that's missing the point of the undergraduate education.
_________________

"Sic volvere parcas..."

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 0

Current Student
User avatar
Joined: 21 Aug 2008
Posts: 348

Kudos [?]: 38 [0], given: 0

Schools: Fuqua '11
Re: A Shrewd Undergraduate's guide to HBS admissions [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Feb 2009, 12:00
The approach can go both ways I think. I know some people from undergrad who were all about diversifying their schedule, getting minors or even dual majors in subjects they had no professional interest in, they were just curious. And I think they were a lot better off for doing so. But likewise I know other people who got so dragged down by worrying about these secondary classes that they weren't able to put their best foot forward in their major's core classes (like a mechanical engineer who half-asks his engineering design capstone because he's so worried about passing his Chinese test).

I feel it comes down to what environment you learn the best in. If you're disciplined enough to learn a language or say a soft science on your own time, then I'd recommend that, it's a lot cheaper/more flexible than a classroom setting. But if you need the pressure of grades/tests to push you, then maybe you should go for the diverse schedule, as long as you don't sacrifice other things.

Kudos [?]: 38 [0], given: 0

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 05 Feb 2008
Posts: 322

Kudos [?]: 59 [0], given: 10

Location: Texas
Re: A Shrewd Undergraduate's guide to HBS admissions [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Feb 2009, 20:29
Good read.

Kudos [?]: 59 [0], given: 10

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 26 Nov 2008
Posts: 87

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 0

Location: Silicon Valley, CA
Schools: HBS, MIT Sloan, Stanford, Haas (withdrew with interview invite)
Re: A Shrewd Undergraduate's guide to HBS admissions [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Feb 2009, 01:15
Leverandon wrote:
Most of that makes sense, but I have to dissent from this:

"Do not innocently engage in learning for 'learning sake' --although certainly say you do. Do not take introductory Arabic or Chinese because they sound contemporary and important, especially when most kids in those classes will be native speakers looking for guts."

I took plenty of classes just because they sounded interesting. Most of them were. I took Latin simply because I wanted to learn Latin and Shakespeare because I wanted to study the Bard. Your undergraduate career is your time to grow as a person and become academically fulfilled. I know plenty of people who played it safe and only took surefire As and only in classes for their major, but I think that's missing the point of the undergraduate education.


I agree with you, Leverandon. That sentence really rubbed me the wrong way. My advice would be to major in something you are truly passionate about, and choose electives that interest you (you're likely to do better in classes you like anyway). If your extracurricular leadership shows an even further commitment to your academic passions, I think that's great too.

I spent probably half my HBS interview talking about art and feminism. I walked away feeling HBS was looking for truly passionate and intellectual people.

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 0

VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 09 Dec 2008
Posts: 1221

Kudos [?]: 245 [0], given: 17

Schools: Kellogg Class of 2011
Re: A Shrewd Undergraduate's guide to HBS admissions [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Feb 2009, 05:08
I agree as well. In undergrad, my main major was accounting since that was what I wanted to do after graduating. But as a result of having to take some philosophy courses as part of the core curriculum (I went to a Jesuit school), I found that I really enjoyed philosophy and ended up with a second major in it. At the time I thought it was a worthless major and just did it for "learning's sake". Now, besides having a much more well-rounded education than if I spent all my time in the business school, I can't count how many times it's come up in interviews and given me a great opportunity to show that I'm not just another beancounter.
_________________

GMAT Club Premium Membership - big benefits and savings

Kudos [?]: 245 [0], given: 17

Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 05 Feb 2009
Posts: 48

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 2

Schools: Columbia, Wharton, LBS
Re: A Shrewd Undergraduate's guide to HBS admissions [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Feb 2009, 11:43
And here I Was... thinking that an Econ minor would be an interesting compliment to my accounting specialist degree. I think it depends on the student, specially at my school ..(which is known for deflating marks) people here almost always decide to go where the best (Mark)/(time spent studying) ratio is. You really gotta love econometrics/physics/Economic thought/advanced phil courses to take them for the sake of it - your GPA will suffer -.
If you want to work in a field that requires technical knowledge, your marks will always come under scrutiny when it's time to apply for those covetted jobs. Why kill your GPA for the "experience" when someone who took the easy way out will be ahead of you 5 yrs down the road?




Jerz wrote:
I agree as well. In undergrad, my main major was accounting since that was what I wanted to do after graduating. But as a result of having to take some philosophy courses as part of the core curriculum (I went to a Jesuit school), I found that I really enjoyed philosophy and ended up with a second major in it. At the time I thought it was a worthless major and just did it for "learning's sake". Now, besides having a much more well-rounded education than if I spent all my time in the business school, I can't count how many times it's come up in interviews and given me a great opportunity to show that I'm not just another beancounter.

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 2

SVP
SVP
User avatar
Status: Burning mid-night oil....daily
Joined: 07 Nov 2008
Posts: 2400

Kudos [?]: 746 [0], given: 548

Schools: Yale SOM 2011 Alum, Kellogg, Booth, Tuck
WE 1: IB - Restructuring & Distressed M&A
Reviews Badge
Re: A Shrewd Undergraduate's guide to HBS admissions [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Feb 2009, 13:14
cdnaudit wrote:
Why kill your GPA for the "experience" when someone who took the easy way out will be ahead of you 5 yrs down the road?


1) Just because one takes classes outside his/her concentration for the love of learning, it doesn't mean his/her GPA has to suffer. This forum is full of overachievers, and soon-to-be overachievers at bschool. (Just look at the Booth Admitted Student thread where they discuss extra courses one can take etc)

2) There's no law that someone taking an easy way out will always be ahead of him/her 5 years down the road. Well arounded person/education will see the benefits sooner or later. This is one of the main reasons why many top undergrad schools don't have undergrad business schools. They want their students to expose themselves to various curriculum to prepare themselves for the business world without concentrating on a specific business concentration.
_________________

GMAT Club Premium Membership - big benefits and savings

Kudos [?]: 746 [0], given: 548

Re: A Shrewd Undergraduate's guide to HBS admissions   [#permalink] 26 Feb 2009, 13:14
Display posts from previous: Sort by

A Shrewd Undergraduate's guide to HBS admissions

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Moderators: OasisGC, aeropower, bb10



GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.