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Re: A tiny fraction of binary systems belong to a curious subclass whose r [#permalink]
Hi GmatWizard ,

I wonder if you could help me with question 3 , I know where to spot the answer , however I have some doubts...
in the passage it says that Such systems radiate (5) strongly in the visible region of the spectrum, but some of them do so even more strongly at both shorter and longer wavelengths, so I lean on answer B rather than D, because for D to be true shouldnt all of them to have this attribute?
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Re: A tiny fraction of binary systems belong to a curious subclass whose r [#permalink]
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Thank you GmatWizard for tagging me and believing in my abilities to help ;-)

So Q3 is pretty straightforward detail question which most people find easy-

Detail to be found at the start of the passage as you right pointed out -

tiny fraction of binary systems belong to a curious subclass whose radiation has a wavelength distribution so peculiar that it long defied explanation. Such systems radiate (5) strongly in the visible region of the spectrum, but some of them do so even more strongly at both shorter and longer wavelengths: in the ultraviolet region and in the infrared and radio regions.

3. According to the passage, the radiation emitted by symbiotic stars is distinctive in that it
(A) generates standard wavelengths
(B) consists partly of visible waves TRAP answer - the passage partly says that such systems radiate strongly in the visible regions - here I believe that such refers to bianry star systems but some of them ( now them refers to symbiotic) do so at extreme ends
(C) is transferred from one star to its partner
(D) is strongest at the extreme ends of the spectrum Perfect - the passage states that this is the peculiar part of the radiation received from symbiotic
(E) emanates primarily from the larger star

It is important to note that the question specifically asks what characteristic is distinctive in the ration of symbiotic stars

Hope this is helpful. :-)

Btw, it took 4 mins 45 secs to get 3 out of 4 correct. I fell for Q4 Option (C) vs. E.. but official explanations are helpful to see why (C) is wrong in Q4. :-)
UNSTOPPABLE12 wrote:
Hi GmatWizard ,

I wonder if you could help me with question 3 , I know where to spot the answer , however I have some doubts...
in the passage it says that Such systems radiate (5) strongly in the visible region of the spectrum, but some of them do so even more strongly at both shorter and longer wavelengths, so I lean on answer B rather than D, because for D to be true shouldn't all of them to have this attribute?
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Re: A tiny fraction of binary systems belong to a curious subclass whose r [#permalink]
Hi Gladiator59, I understand your reasoning, but the reason I rejected option D was because it says extreme ends of the spectrum. Which I believe cannot be inferred and I could not find it explicitly being said anywhere. What if ultraviolet and radio waves aren't in the extreme end of the spectrum. Can we infer something like that on such questions??? egmat
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Re: A tiny fraction of binary systems belong to a curious subclass whose r [#permalink]
Can anyone explain solution to Q4?
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Re: A tiny fraction of binary systems belong to a curious subclass whose r [#permalink]
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Expert Reply
ronny7 wrote:
Can anyone explain solution to Q4?


Official Explanation


4. The author suggests that

Difficulty Level: 700

Explanation

Next up is an open-ended Inference question with no clues as to what the test makers are after, so we have no choice but to wade into the choices, looking for the one that's supported by the hard facts of the passage.

(A) bollixes up the order of things; in fact, it pretty much gets it backwards. In paragraph 3 we learn that the ionized gas surrounding the cool red giant looked weird to scientists for decades before radiation from the invisible hot companion was discovered, so it can't be the detection of radiation that prompted scientists to look into the matter.

(B) tries to fashion a causal relationship out of two facts in the passage. True, the small hot stars attach to the big cool ones, and yes, we're told in paragraph 4 that red giants have a mass of one or two suns. But what has one thing to do with the other? Nothing, as far as the passage suggests, so (B) is out. An 800 test taker is suspicious of choices that attempt to link two or more elements from different parts of the passage.

(C) A million years may not seem so "brief" to us, but according to the passage that's a relatively short period of time for a symbiotic phase. Regardless, other solar events are outside the scope of the passage, so there's no way we can judge from the material at hand the time it takes for these to occur. For all we know, a million years is a long time for most solar events; all we know about is symbiotic stars.

(D) erroneously plays off the Magellan detail in paragraph 2. just because a few symbiotics were found over there doesn't in any way suggest that the only symbiotic stars outside our galaxy are in the Large Cloud of Magellan.

(E) That leaves (E), which must be correct. In paragraph 4, the author says that the small number of symbiotics detected in our galaxy suggests that the symbiotic phase is brief—"perhaps as short as a million years." Evidently, the author sees a link between the length of the phase and our ability to detect symbiotic stars. Therefore, it's reasonable to infer that if these phases were much longer, we'd probably detect more of them.

Answer: E
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Re: A tiny fraction of binary systems belong to a curious subclass whose r [#permalink]
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Re: A tiny fraction of binary systems belong to a curious subclass whose r [#permalink]
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