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According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's

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According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2018, 03:15
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According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it.


(A) one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it

(B) always work; because you don't think about it or assess it, you just do it

(C) always one's own work: not thinking about or assessing it, but simply to do it

(D) not to think or assess, but doing one's own work

(E) neither to think about one's own work nor to assess it, it is always simply doing it

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Re: According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2018, 03:45
+1 for E

A - 'it' here is ambiguos.

B - 'always work', this changes the meaning as it removes own work from the sentence.

C - Not X, but Y. X and Y are kot parallel.

D - Changes the meaning as it doesn't tell us about what to think or assess about

E - 'It' clearly refers to work. This conveys the meaning correctly.

Please correct me if I'm wrong

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Re: According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2018, 11:26
Bunuel wrote:
According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it.


(A) one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it

(B) always work; because you don't think about it or assess it, you just do it

(C) always one's own work: not thinking about or assessing it, but simply to do it

(D) not to think or assess, but doing one's own work

(E) neither to think about one's own work nor to assess it, it is always simply doing it


IMHO (A)

According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's own work, always one's own work:
    not thinking about it,
    not assessing it,
    but simply doing it.

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Re: According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2018, 18:44
Bunuel wrote:
According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it.


(A) one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it

(B) always work; because you don't think about it or assess it, you just do it

(C) always one's own work: not thinking about or assessing it, but simply to do it

(D) not to think or assess, but doing one's own work

(E) neither to think about one's own work nor to assess it, it is always simply doing it


We understand that "think", "asses" and "do" have to be parellel to each other. But it is not the case in C, D, E, so these options are out.

Now between B and A.
In B we we have semicolon after "work", and then follows "because". It can not be. Because after semicolon must follow the independent clause, but "because" shows the continuation of the first caluse - some explanation. So B is out.

A - good.
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Re: According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2018, 12:28
DharLog wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it.


(A) one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it

(B) always work; because you don't think about it or assess it, you just do it

(C) always one's own work: not thinking about or assessing it, but simply to do it

(D) not to think or assess, but doing one's own work

(E) neither to think about one's own work nor to assess it, it is always simply doing it


We understand that "think", "asses" and "do" have to be parellel to each other. But it is not the case in C, D, E, so these options are out.

Now between B and A.
In B we we have semicolon after "work", and then follows "because". It can not be. Because after semicolon must follow the independent clause, but "because" shows the continuation of the first caluse - some explanation. So B is out.

A - good.


Want to add something.

Such option of (E) might be right. (As I think)

neither to think about one's own work nor to assess it; it is always simply doing it

semicolon instead comma
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Re: According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2018, 14:25
Akash720 wrote:
+1 for E

A - 'it' here is ambiguos.

B - 'always work', this changes the meaning as it removes own work from the sentence.

C - Not X, but Y. X and Y are kot parallel.

D - Changes the meaning as it doesn't tell us about what to think or assess about

E - 'It' clearly refers to work. This conveys the meaning correctly.

Please correct me if I'm wrong

Posted from my mobile device
E is wrong because 2 independent clause are joined by a comma

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Re: According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2018, 14:28
DharLog wrote:
DharLog wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it.


(A) one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it

(B) always work; because you don't think about it or assess it, you just do it

(C) always one's own work: not thinking about or assessing it, but simply to do it

(D) not to think or assess, but doing one's own work

(E) neither to think about one's own work nor to assess it, it is always simply doing it


We understand that "think", "asses" and "do" have to be parellel to each other. But it is not the case in C, D, E, so these options are out.

Now between B and A.
In B we we have semicolon after "work", and then follows "because". It can not be. Because after semicolon must follow the independent clause, but "because" shows the continuation of the first caluse - some explanation. So B is out.

A - good.


Want to add something.

Such option of (E) might be right. (As I think)

neither to think about one's own work nor to assess it; it is always simply doing it

semicolon instead comma
But this adds another error
Using two *it* in the same sentence used in different sense ----> once as a placeholder and other as a substitute for *work*

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Re: According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Aug 2018, 12:20
According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it.


(A) one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it - Maintains parallelism. Correct

(B) always work; because you don't think about it or assess it, you just do it - Requires and independent clause after semicolon.

(C) always one's own work: not thinking about or assessing it, but simply to do it - Not parallel

(D) not to think or assess, but doing one's own work - Not parallel

(E) neither to think about one's own work nor to assess it, it is always simply doing it[/quote] - Not a sentence.
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Re: According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's   [#permalink] 26 Aug 2018, 12:20
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