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Re: According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's [#permalink]
Bunuel wrote:
According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it.


(A) one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it

(B) always work; because you don't think about it or assess it, you just do it

(C) always one's own work: not thinking about or assessing it, but simply to do it

(D) not to think or assess, but doing one's own work

(E) neither to think about one's own work nor to assess it, it is always simply doing it


IMHO (A)

According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's own work, always one's own work:
    not thinking about it,
    not assessing it,
    but simply doing it.
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Re: According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's [#permalink]
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DharLog wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it.


(A) one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it

(B) always work; because you don't think about it or assess it, you just do it

(C) always one's own work: not thinking about or assessing it, but simply to do it

(D) not to think or assess, but doing one's own work

(E) neither to think about one's own work nor to assess it, it is always simply doing it


We understand that "think", "asses" and "do" have to be parellel to each other. But it is not the case in C, D, E, so these options are out.

Now between B and A.
In B we we have semicolon after "work", and then follows "because". It can not be. Because after semicolon must follow the independent clause, but "because" shows the continuation of the first caluse - some explanation. So B is out.

A - good.


Want to add something.

Such option of (E) might be right. (As I think)

neither to think about one's own work nor to assess it; it is always simply doing it

semicolon instead comma
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Re: According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's [#permalink]
Akash720 wrote:
+1 for E

A - 'it' here is ambiguos.

B - 'always work', this changes the meaning as it removes own work from the sentence.

C - Not X, but Y. X and Y are kot parallel.

D - Changes the meaning as it doesn't tell us about what to think or assess about

E - 'It' clearly refers to work. This conveys the meaning correctly.

Please correct me if I'm wrong

Posted from my mobile device
E is wrong because 2 independent clause are joined by a comma

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Re: According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's [#permalink]
DharLog wrote:
DharLog wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it.


(A) one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it

(B) always work; because you don't think about it or assess it, you just do it

(C) always one's own work: not thinking about or assessing it, but simply to do it

(D) not to think or assess, but doing one's own work

(E) neither to think about one's own work nor to assess it, it is always simply doing it


We understand that "think", "asses" and "do" have to be parellel to each other. But it is not the case in C, D, E, so these options are out.

Now between B and A.
In B we we have semicolon after "work", and then follows "because". It can not be. Because after semicolon must follow the independent clause, but "because" shows the continuation of the first caluse - some explanation. So B is out.

A - good.


Want to add something.

Such option of (E) might be right. (As I think)

neither to think about one's own work nor to assess it; it is always simply doing it

semicolon instead comma
But this adds another error
Using two *it* in the same sentence used in different sense ----> once as a placeholder and other as a substitute for *work*

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Re: According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's [#permalink]
According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it.


(A) one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it - Maintains parallelism. Correct

(B) always work; because you don't think about it or assess it, you just do it - Requires and independent clause after semicolon.

(C) always one's own work: not thinking about or assessing it, but simply to do it - Not parallel

(D) not to think or assess, but doing one's own work - Not parallel

(E) neither to think about one's own work nor to assess it, it is always simply doing it[/quote] - Not a sentence.
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Re: According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's [#permalink]
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Why doesn't A fall into the category of concision/redundancy?
My thinking was that the repetition of "one's own work, always one's own work" does not seem to adhere to the GMAT's standards of a concise and effective business communication.
Bunuel - please advice
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Re: According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's [#permalink]
mba20202022 wrote:
Why doesn't A fall into the category of concision/redundancy?
My thinking was that the repetition of "one's own work, always one's own work" does not seem to adhere to the GMAT's standards of a concise and effective business communication.
Bunuel - please advice


I have the same issue. Can someone please address it? I could not understand why the author has repeated it? To me the repeat usage sounded redundant. Hence so as soon as I read the sentence stem, I presumed option "(A)" to be wrong !!!!
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Re: According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's [#permalink]
Not very easy to get his intention here. D makes a lot of sense, meaningwise, even if the tenses are not parallel.

D sounds like a proper aphorism. "Dont think too much (in general), dont assess too much (in general), just take care of your own business."

A sounds a little alien. "Dont think about your own work, dont assess your own work, just do it."

Posted from my mobile device
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According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's [#permalink]
Bunuel wrote:
According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it.



(A) one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it

(B) always work; because you don't think about it or assess it, you just do it
because cannot be associated with independent clause it's attrivuted to dependent clauses

(C) always one's own work: not thinking about or assessing it, but simply to do it
do verb isn't correct doing is the right one to use in addition there's a parallelism error between to do and always work

(D) not to think or assess, but doing one's own work
This sentence don't convey the right meaning but rather distorts it

(E) neither to think about one's own work nor to assess it, it is always simply doing it
Pretty tough one however since there is a parallelism error work and doing it

Even A seems wordy and long since it's better than wrong answer therefore IMO A
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Re: According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's [#permalink]
Would option C be correct if it is reworded as :"always one's own work: not thinking about or assessing it, but simply doing it", as option A seemed redundant but I chose it because it did not have the parallelism error which is there in option C, but if C was written as mentioned above, would it not be a better choice?
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Re: According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's [#permalink]
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priyanshi1804 wrote:
Would option C be correct if it is reworded as :"always one's own work: not thinking about or assessing it, but simply doing it", as option A seemed redundant but I chose it because it did not have the parallelism error which is there in option C, but if C was written as mentioned above, would it not be a better choice?


Hello priyanshi1804,

We hope this finds you well.

To answer your query, the version of Option C you have put forward is grammatically correct and would be more concise than A, making it the superior choice.

We hope this helps.
All the best!
Experts' Global Team
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Re: According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's [#permalink]
Bunuel wrote:
According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it.


(A) one's own work, always one's own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it

(B) always work; because you don't think about it or assess it, you just do it

(C) always one's own work: not thinking about or assessing it, but simply to do it

(D) not to think or assess, but doing one's own work

(E) neither to think about one's own work nor to assess it, it is always simply doing it


B, C, D, and E are ambiguous in what the phrases are trying to accomplish, or they violate parallelism

A is the most clear, even with the additional phrase "one's own work" with "always one's own work"
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According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's [#permalink]
Akash720 wrote:
+1 for E

A - 'it' here is ambiguos.

B - 'always work', this changes the meaning as it removes own work from the sentence.

C - Not X, but Y. X and Y are kot parallel.

D - Changes the meaning as it doesn't tell us about what to think or assess about

E - 'It' clearly refers to work. This conveys the meaning correctly.

Please correct me if I'm wrong


Posted from my mobile device


Here, In E option, we have two Independent Clause connected by comma, which is Incorrect
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Re: According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's [#permalink]
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Re: According to the professor's philosophy, the antidote to envy is one's [#permalink]
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