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Advanced SC: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has

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Advanced SC: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has  [#permalink]

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Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.

(A) Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting

(B) Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects

(C) As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting

(D) As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject

(E) As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject

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Originally posted by souvik101990 on 07 May 2015, 08:55.
Last edited by hazelnut on 21 Nov 2017, 04:17, edited 1 time in total.
Edited the question.
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Re: Advanced SC: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has  [#permalink]

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New post 07 May 2015, 10:44
3
souvik101990 wrote:
Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.


oh man..took me 1:47 to get to the answer...tricky one!

let's understand the meaning of the sentence:
Once the Sun's hydrogen in its core is exhausted, THE SUN expands into a red giant, and later it will eject its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.
This scenario is true for any other stars that have a similar mass.

Error analysis:
We see that we need a comparison here - sun is compared with any star of similar mass.
Correct comparison:
Like+noun
AS+clause

Like+clause - is incorrect
As+noun - is not comparison, and has a totally different function.

Present perfect "has exhausted" - suspicious
"it" after core - suspicious, can refer to Sun and core
ejecting - hm, comma before, looks like it should modify the preceding clause, makes sense, but let's check other choices.


(A) Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting

(B) Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects
comparison error - any star of similar mass is compared with once the hydrogen - not correct.
pronoun it - ambiguous, is it referring to hydrogen or core? Sure it doesn't refer to Sun, since Sun's is used as an adjective here that describes the "CORE".

(C) As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting
same pronoun error.
comma + and ... hm, strange construction...introduces a new clause, but where is the subject? where is the verb?

(D) As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject
comparison error as in B
pronoun error as in B and C

(E) As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject
first part of the sentence - for me suspicious, it is not clear what is compared.
pronouns are used correctly, and the sentence tells us the intended meaning.
verbs in the second part of the sentence "will expand" and "eject" are parallel
since other choices are incorrect, this one is the only left :)
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Re: Advanced SC: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jun 2015, 14:10
2
souvik101990 wrote:
Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.

(A) Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting

(B) Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects

(C) As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting

(D) As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject

(E) As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject


(A) 'like' cannot be followed by a clause

(B) 'it' cannot refer to 'Sun', because 'Sun' is in possessive case and therefore is a an adjective rather than a noun. Hence, it refers to 'Sun's core', which is not the intended antecedent.

(C) The same issue as in B with 'it'

(D) The same issue as in B with 'it'

(E) Correct!
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Re: Advanced SC: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Aug 2016, 03:34
Quote:
(E) As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject
first part of the sentence - for me suspicious, it is not clear what is compared.


I agree. At first glance, it seemed very suspicious: A. too wordy; B. "any star of similar mass," as stated in (D), sounds more proper if we compare "the sun" and "other stars." My analysis is that "the case" is actually describing the whole process: the star, or the sun, exhausts the hydrogen in its core, and then expand, and eventually eject its outer envelope of gases. So, the writer is saying "the sun's case" and "the star's case" are the same process.

Does anyone have an idea?
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Re: Advanced SC: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Aug 2016, 05:46
1
grimbergen wrote:
Quote:
(E) As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject
first part of the sentence - for me suspicious, it is not clear what is compared.


I agree. At first glance, it seemed very suspicious: A. too wordy; B. "any star of similar mass," as stated in (D), sounds more proper if we compare "the sun" and "other stars." My analysis is that "the case" is actually describing the whole process: the star, or the sun, exhausts the hydrogen in its core, and then expand, and eventually eject its outer envelope of gases. So, the writer is saying "the sun's case" and "the star's case" are the same process.

Does anyone have an idea?


I think your reasoning is correct. Or you can go the other way. A and B are wrong since "like" is not used to compare clauses. In C and D wrong comparison - "stars" and "hydrogen". Hence only E is left
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Re: Advanced SC: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Aug 2016, 23:07
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Quote:
I think your reasoning is correct. Or you can go the other way. A and B are wrong since "like" is not used to compare clauses. In C and D wrong comparison - "stars" and "hydrogen". Hence only E is left


Thank you for the help, Konstantin1983! =) Yes, after checking the wrong answers, it became clear that answer choice (E) is correct.
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Re: Advanced SC: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2017, 07:42
2
souvik101990 wrote:
Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.

(A) Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting

(B) Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects

(C) As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting

(D) As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject

(E) As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject


Quote:
(A) Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting
(B) Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects

We are comparing to clauses so we need to use 'as', so A and B are OUT!

Quote:
(C) As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting
(D) As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject

'it' has no referent as Sun's is a possessive noun, and we can use the possessive pronoun 'its' here, but the Sun's core will not expand into a red giant, the sun will. Plus it seems to be comparing a star to hydrogen. So these 2 options are OUT.

Quote:
(E) As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject

Only option left, and the right answer.
Sun is compared to the star. 'its' refers back to 'the sun'

So E is the answer.
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Re: Advanced SC: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2017, 09:30
2
1
akshayk wrote:
Quote:
(A) Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting
(B) Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects

We are comparing to clauses so we need to use 'as', so A and B are OUT!

Quote:
(C) As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting
(D) As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject

'it' has no referent as Sun's is a possessive noun, and we can use the possessive pronoun 'its' here, but the Sun's core will not expand into a red giant, the sun will. Plus it seems to be comparing a star to hydrogen. So these 2 options are OUT.

Quote:
(E) As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject

Only option left, and the right answer.
Sun is compared to the star. 'its' refers back to 'the sun'

So E is the answer.


Hello akshayk,

Great analysis I must say. It's very thorough and detailed. Keep up the good work. :)

I would just like to add my two cents to the analysis of Choice A and B.

akshayk wrote:
Quote:
(A) Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting
(B) Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects

We are comparing to clauses so we need to use 'as', so A and B are OUT!


It is not that since the sentence intends to compare two clauses, usage of like stands incorrect in this sentence. The same comparison can be presented using like as well. But that's later.

Let's first discuss why Choice A is incorrect. Choice A is incorrect because like has been followed by a clause any star of similar mass would do. This usage is incorrect because like, while presenting comparison, cannot be followed by a clause.

Choice B is incorrect because it presents illogical comparison because per this choice, any star has been illogically compared to the hydrogen in the Sun.

The intended comparison can be written using like as follows:

Like any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.

For more details and official examples on the Usage of Like Vs. As, you can review the article named As Vs Like: Correct and Incorrect usages in the following link:
https://gmatclub.com/forum/as-vs-like-correct-and-incorrect-usages-133950.html


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: Advanced SC: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2017, 09:36
1
egmat wrote:
akshayk wrote:
Quote:
(A) Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting
(B) Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects

We are comparing to clauses so we need to use 'as', so A and B are OUT!

Quote:
(C) As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting
(D) As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject

'it' has no referent as Sun's is a possessive noun, and we can use the possessive pronoun 'its' here, but the Sun's core will not expand into a red giant, the sun will. Plus it seems to be comparing a star to hydrogen. So these 2 options are OUT.

Quote:
(E) As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject

Only option left, and the right answer.
Sun is compared to the star. 'its' refers back to 'the sun'

So E is the answer.


Hello akshayk,

Great analysis I must say. It's very thorough and detailed. Keep up the good work. :)

I would just like to add my two cents to the analysis of Choice A and B.

akshayk wrote:
Quote:
(A) Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting
(B) Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects

We are comparing to clauses so we need to use 'as', so A and B are OUT!


It is not that since the sentence intends to compare two clauses, usage of like stands incorrect in this sentence. The same comparison can be presented using like as well. But that's later.

Let's first discuss why Choice A is incorrect. Choice A is incorrect because like has been followed by a clause any star of similar mass would do. This usage is incorrect because like, while presenting comparison, cannot be followed by a clause.

Choice B is incorrect because it presents illogical comparison because per this choice, any star has been illogically compared to the hydrogen in the Sun.

The intended comparison can be written using like as follows:

Like any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.

For more details and official examples on the Usage of Like Vs. As, you can review the article named As Vs Like: Correct and Incorrect usages in the following link:
https://gmatclub.com/forum/as-vs-like-correct-and-incorrect-usages-133950.html


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha


Hi Shraddha,

Thank you for your analysis.
For A, that’s what I meant i.e. A has a verb and there we cannot use Like :)

For B, you are right, the error is similar to C and D.

I’m going to go through the link you shared. You never know enough to NOT learn more :)




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Re: Advanced SC: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2017, 03:02
This question confused me a little. If I am not wrong, this is comparison. For comparison, isn't 'AS' wrong?
I always thought 'Like' is the right term for comparison.

Can someone please clarify this doubt ?
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Re: Advanced SC: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2017, 03:21
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pra1785 wrote:
This question confused me a little. If I am not wrong, this is comparison. For comparison, isn't 'AS' wrong?
I always thought 'Like' is the right term for comparison.

Can someone please clarify this doubt ?


Hi pra1785 ,

As is also used for comparisons.

The difference between using the two is "Like" should be followed by a noun whereas "as" should be followed by a clause to make comparisons.
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Re: Advanced SC: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2017, 03:45
abhimahna wrote:
pra1785 wrote:
This question confused me a little. If I am not wrong, this is comparison. For comparison, isn't 'AS' wrong?
I always thought 'Like' is the right term for comparison.

Can someone please clarify this doubt ?


Hi pra1785 ,

As is also used for comparisons.

The difference between using the two is "Like" should be followed by a noun whereas "as" should be followed by a clause to make comparisons.


Interesting....thank you for the clarification. I wasn't aware of that.
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Re: Advanced SC: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2017, 03:45
1
pra1785 wrote:
This question confused me a little. If I am not wrong, this is comparison. For comparison, isn't 'AS' wrong?
I always thought 'Like' is the right term for comparison.

Can someone please clarify this doubt ?

Hi pra1785, indeed both as and like are used for comparisons. For example, both the following sentences would be correct:

Peter designed the flapping-wing ornithopter that could fly like birds.

Peter designed the flapping-wing ornithopter that could fly as birds do.

p.s. Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses like Vs As, its application and examples in significant detail. If someone is interested, PM me your email-id; I can mail the corresponding section.
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Re: Advanced SC: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2017, 04:08
The Answer is E

E uses proper comparison structure as compared to other answer choices

As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject
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Re: Advanced SC: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Oct 2018, 07:25
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Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.

(A) Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting

(B) Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects

(C) As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting

(D) As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject

(E) As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject

Simply look at the pronoun 'it'. The pronoun should refer to the Sun because that is the one that would expand and not the hydrogen. You can drop B, C, and D on this count alone. Then you have the problem of using like with do in A.
So you have E finally left.

You may have umpteen other ways of finding fault with these wrong choices. However, what I have said above is the shortest.


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Re: Advanced SC: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has &nbs [#permalink] 29 Oct 2018, 07:25
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