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Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the

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Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the [#permalink]

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Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its store, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.

(A) Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its store, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting

(B) Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects

(C) As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting

(D) As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject

(E) As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject

Why not d?

Does it make sense to say "as in the case of any star of similar mass" ?

Originally posted by eybrj2 on 11 Dec 2011, 00:18.
Last edited by hazelnut on 02 May 2018, 16:02, edited 3 times in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the [#permalink]

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New post 11 Dec 2011, 06:44
eybrj2 wrote:
77. Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its store, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.
D. As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject
E. As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject

Why not d?

Does it make sense to say "as in the case of any star of similar mass" ?


In choice D, "it" refers incorrectly to Sun's core. "it" should refer to "Sun". Choice E makes the subject "Sun" parallels with the pronoun "it". So, it's clear. If you feel "as in the case of any star of similar mass" looks weird, you should learn to adapt with this type of sentence.

Hope that helps
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the [#permalink]

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New post 11 Dec 2011, 08:12
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In D it compares start to sun's core

In E it compares start and sun so this is correct
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the [#permalink]

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New post 01 Nov 2012, 22:37
I do not know how to use "as in the case..." and " as would be the case..."

pls, help explain the use of the two.

thank you very much

if I do not understand the use, I can not write a sentence using the phrase and can not be confident with SC.
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2013, 15:41
sdas wrote:
Like any star if similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.

A. .....
B. Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects
C. As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting
D. as any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the sun's core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject
E. As would be case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject


Like or As? We have a comparison, so both could be correct.

comparison: Like + noun / As + clause

"Like" wants a noun, not a clause."Like any star if similar mass would do" is wrong. out A
"Like any star of similar mass" like here is correct; but in B what does it ("it will expand") refer to? to the core or to the hydrogen? out B
"As" wants a clause. out C
"as any star of similar mass would", in the next part of the sentence we are looking for the "subject" of this premise. But the subject is " the hydrogen" and this is not logical, moreover the " the hydrogen" "will expand into a red giant", are you sure? out D

IMO E
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2013, 17:50
Like vs. As usage – Like is generally used to compare nouns but for clauses “as” is used.

A. Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting

B. Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects

C. As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting [any star is compared against Sun’s core – eliminate it]

D. As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject [any star is compared against Sun’s core – eliminate it]

E. As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject


Answer: E
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2013, 19:20
Quote:
c says : As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting


the main problem with C is the "it" that comes later in the clause ."it" is suppose to refer to the "sun" but "sun" is in possessive case

it is precisely for this reason that B and D can be eliminated !!!
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2013, 23:06
I am also inclined towards E.

Like here is used to compare the "case" and not the subject "sun" Hence, E is the closest bet!
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the [#permalink]

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New post 29 Nov 2013, 06:47
Plus D looks like a run on sentence. There's no (,) before it. Hence E. Although I mus say the comparison by GMAT standards was completely haywire in this sentence :teleport
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jul 2014, 16:56
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E

AB: Wrong; Wrong use of "like"; element after comma should be a noun
D: Wrong; incomplete clause after "as" since "would" should have a verb after it
C: Wrong; "it" should refer to "Sun" not to "hydrogen", but it can't , because "Sun" is in a possessive form.
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jul 2014, 20:57
There is another issue in D, which does not seem to have been highlighted so far. It says:

once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted

This does not tell us who exhausts the hydrogen in the Sun’s core. The original sentence says: once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its store.

So, this is a big meaning issue with D.
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the [#permalink]

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New post 06 Aug 2014, 22:52
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Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.

A. like+ noun while here like+ clause
verb tense error: has exhausted--> exhausts
llism error--> expands is not parallel with ejecting
using verb-ing modifier here changes the intended meaning.. it seems that sun expansion to the red giant results in ejection of its outer envelope of gasses

B. Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects
passive voice is not necessary and changes the meaning.
once....., then--> then is redundant
verb tense error: expand ad eject should express in future tense

C. As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting
passive construction,
pronoun error---> "it" cannot refer to the sun but it refers to the sun's core
llism error as in A


D. As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject
pronoun error as in C.
passive construction

E. As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject
"as would be the case" is not considered wordy by GMAC, and it is a correct structure
it can clearly refers to the Sun
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the [#permalink]

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New post 12 Sep 2014, 11:34
Every option from B to D wrongly compares star with hydrogen. So out.

A is wrong for using 'would do'.

E is correct because only this option correctly compares star with sun
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2016, 22:41
y as is prefferred to as ...we use LIKE for nouns and in this case star
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the [#permalink]

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New post 09 Dec 2016, 01:49
[quote="eybrj2"]77. Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its store, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.

A. Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its store, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting
B. Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects
C. As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting
D. As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject
E. As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject

"as the case with+noun is" is a idiom expression we have to know.
as the case with you is, I have to learn gmat soon
is correct sentence. the above expression give us a chance to make comparision easy.
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the [#permalink]

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New post 07 Aug 2017, 02:36
A. Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its store, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting- Like is incorrect usage since actions are being compared
B. Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects- Like is incorrect usage since actions are being compared
C. As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting- Antecedent of 'it' is not clear, sun or sun's core
D. As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject- Antecedent of 'it' is not clear, sun or sun's core
E. As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject- correct..As is correct...it signifying the Sun
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2017, 02:42
Hi

I am little confuse here on subject verb agreement, If any body can help that would be great.

In Option D-
D. As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject

Somewhere it is written that It is pointing to Sun's core but I think it should point to Hydrogen, because hydrogen is subject here. (I know meaning will be absurd but am going through some grammar)

In option E

E. As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject

I have confusion about the antecedent of It, Does it not Referring to Core , because here in this option i think that the antecedent is ambiguous

Am I missing something ? or It only refer to subject of the previous sentence if two sentence are separated by comma.
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2017, 13:25
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Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its store, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.

A. Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its store, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting--. Like for a clause is wrong;

B. Like any star of similar mas
s, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects --- Comparing any star with the hydrogen -- wrong.


C. As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting --- couple of errors herein. 1. comparing the case of a star with the hydrogen; 2.the unparallel " ejecting' phrase after 'and'

D. As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject --- 1. ambiguous referent of 'it' to mean hydrogen, 2. Just stopping with the auxiliary verb 'would' renders the subordinate clause a fragment

E. As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject --The correct choice.

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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2017, 14:12
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As far as I know, the protocol for the reference of a pronoun to its eligible noun will be in this order.
1. The pronoun will have the first right to refer to the subject noun,
e.g The Sun is the largest of the Solar system and all planets rotate around it.

2. it may also refer to an object noun with or without essential preposition phrases
e.g Tom ate a mango and it happened to be sweet.

3. There are instances in GMAT when a pronoun has referred to a noun in the prepositional phrase
e.g It was only after Katharine Graham became publisher of the Washington Post in 1963 that it moved into the first rank of American newspapers, and it was under her command that the paper won high praises for its unrelenting reporting of the Watergate scandal.

However, what counts in essence is the logic of the context.
Let's dissect the case of E.
Quote:
E. As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject

Now 'it' certainly points to the Sun as per the first protocol. it may not refer to the hydrogen because it will be an illogical reference as a spent and exhausted material cannot expand. Nor would 'it' refer to the core since if you replace 'it' with the core, then you have to replace also 'its' with core's, implying as 'core's core'. That would be still more illogical.
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the [#permalink]

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New post 01 May 2018, 06:41
eybrj2 wrote:
77. Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its store, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.


A. Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its store, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting - Incorrect. Like X, Y usage issue.

B. Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects - Incorrect. Like X, Y usage issue.

C. As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting - Incorrect. "it" referent issue. "it" cannot refer to "Sun's" because it's possessive + referring to either "Sun's" or "Hydrogen" leads to referent issue. +meaning issue "once the hydrogen ..... is exhausted"

D. As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject - Incorrect. "it" referent issue. "it" cannot refer to "Sun's" because it's possessive + referring to either "Sun's" or "Hydrogen" leads to referent issue. +meaning issue "once the hydrogen ..... is exhausted"

E. As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject - Correct, "its" & "it" referents are clear. Sentence meaning is retained and its clear.

Answer: (E).
Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the   [#permalink] 01 May 2018, 06:41
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