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Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the

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Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 07 Aug 2019, 05:53
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Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.


(A) Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting

(B) Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects

(C) As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting

(D) As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject

(E) As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject

Originally posted by quiet888 on 26 Apr 2008, 09:11.
Last edited by hazelnut on 07 Aug 2019, 05:53, edited 2 times in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2017, 13:25
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Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its store, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.

A. Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its store, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting--. Like for a clause is wrong;

B. Like any star of similar mas
s, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects --- Comparing any star with the hydrogen -- wrong.


C. As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting --- couple of errors herein. 1. comparing the case of a star with the hydrogen; 2.the unparallel " ejecting' phrase after 'and'

D. As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject --- 1. ambiguous referent of 'it' to mean hydrogen, 2. Just stopping with the auxiliary verb 'would' renders the subordinate clause a fragment

E. As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject --The correct choice.

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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Apr 2008, 00:21
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Like vs. As usage – Like is generally used to compare nouns but for clauses “as” is used.

A. Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting

B. Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects

C. As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting [any star is compared against Sun’s core – eliminate it]

D. As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject [any star is compared against Sun’s core – eliminate it]

E. As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject


Answer: E
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Dec 2011, 06:44
eybrj2 wrote:
77. Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its store, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.
D. As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject
E. As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject

Why not d?

Does it make sense to say "as in the case of any star of similar mass" ?


In choice D, "it" refers incorrectly to Sun's core. "it" should refer to "Sun". Choice E makes the subject "Sun" parallels with the pronoun "it". So, it's clear. If you feel "as in the case of any star of similar mass" looks weird, you should learn to adapt with this type of sentence.

Hope that helps
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Dec 2011, 08:12
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In D it compares start to sun's core

In E it compares start and sun so this is correct
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Nov 2012, 22:37
I do not know how to use "as in the case..." and " as would be the case..."

pls, help explain the use of the two.

thank you very much

if I do not understand the use, I can not write a sentence using the phrase and can not be confident with SC.
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2013, 15:41
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sdas wrote:
Like any star if similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.

A. .....
B. Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects
C. As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting
D. as any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the sun's core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject
E. As would be case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject


Like or As? We have a comparison, so both could be correct.

comparison: Like + noun / As + clause

"Like" wants a noun, not a clause."Like any star if similar mass would do" is wrong. out A
"Like any star of similar mass" like here is correct; but in B what does it ("it will expand") refer to? to the core or to the hydrogen? out B
"As" wants a clause. out C
"as any star of similar mass would", in the next part of the sentence we are looking for the "subject" of this premise. But the subject is " the hydrogen" and this is not logical, moreover the " the hydrogen" "will expand into a red giant", are you sure? out D

IMO E
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2013, 17:50
Like vs. As usage – Like is generally used to compare nouns but for clauses “as” is used.

A. Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting

B. Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects

C. As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting [any star is compared against Sun’s core – eliminate it]

D. As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject [any star is compared against Sun’s core – eliminate it]

E. As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject


Answer: E
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2013, 19:20
Quote:
c says : As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting


the main problem with C is the "it" that comes later in the clause ."it" is suppose to refer to the "sun" but "sun" is in possessive case

it is precisely for this reason that B and D can be eliminated !!!
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2013, 23:06
I am also inclined towards E.

Like here is used to compare the "case" and not the subject "sun" Hence, E is the closest bet!
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Nov 2013, 06:47
Plus D looks like a run on sentence. There's no (,) before it. Hence E. Although I mus say the comparison by GMAT standards was completely haywire in this sentence :teleport
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jul 2014, 16:56
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E

AB: Wrong; Wrong use of "like"; element after comma should be a noun
D: Wrong; incomplete clause after "as" since "would" should have a verb after it
C: Wrong; "it" should refer to "Sun" not to "hydrogen", but it can't , because "Sun" is in a possessive form.
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jul 2014, 20:57
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There is another issue in D, which does not seem to have been highlighted so far. It says:

once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted

This does not tell us who exhausts the hydrogen in the Sun’s core. The original sentence says: once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its store.

So, this is a big meaning issue with D.
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Aug 2014, 22:52
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Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.

A. like+ noun while here like+ clause
verb tense error: has exhausted--> exhausts
llism error--> expands is not parallel with ejecting
using verb-ing modifier here changes the intended meaning.. it seems that sun expansion to the red giant results in ejection of its outer envelope of gasses

B. Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects
passive voice is not necessary and changes the meaning.
once....., then--> then is redundant
verb tense error: expand ad eject should express in future tense

C. As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting
passive construction,
pronoun error---> "it" cannot refer to the sun but it refers to the sun's core
llism error as in A


D. As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject
pronoun error as in C.
passive construction

E. As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject
"as would be the case" is not considered wordy by GMAC, and it is a correct structure
it can clearly refers to the Sun
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Sep 2014, 11:34
Every option from B to D wrongly compares star with hydrogen. So out.

A is wrong for using 'would do'.

E is correct because only this option correctly compares star with sun
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 07 May 2015, 11:44
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souvik101990 wrote:
Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.


oh man..took me 1:47 to get to the answer...tricky one!

let's understand the meaning of the sentence:
Once the Sun's hydrogen in its core is exhausted, THE SUN expands into a red giant, and later it will eject its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.
This scenario is true for any other stars that have a similar mass.

Error analysis:
We see that we need a comparison here - sun is compared with any star of similar mass.
Correct comparison:
Like+noun
AS+clause

Like+clause - is incorrect
As+noun - is not comparison, and has a totally different function.

Present perfect "has exhausted" - suspicious
"it" after core - suspicious, can refer to Sun and core
ejecting - hm, comma before, looks like it should modify the preceding clause, makes sense, but let's check other choices.


(A) Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting

(B) Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects
comparison error - any star of similar mass is compared with once the hydrogen - not correct.
pronoun it - ambiguous, is it referring to hydrogen or core? Sure it doesn't refer to Sun, since Sun's is used as an adjective here that describes the "CORE".

(C) As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting
same pronoun error.
comma + and ... hm, strange construction...introduces a new clause, but where is the subject? where is the verb?

(D) As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject
comparison error as in B
pronoun error as in B and C

(E) As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject
first part of the sentence - for me suspicious, it is not clear what is compared.
pronouns are used correctly, and the sentence tells us the intended meaning.
verbs in the second part of the sentence "will expand" and "eject" are parallel
since other choices are incorrect, this one is the only left :)
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 18 May 2015, 00:42
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Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.
Like is followed by nouns. Eliminate A

B. Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects "the sun" should follow "mass"

C. As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting "it" referent is unclear, use of the passive is not ideal, "eventually ejecting" is not the correct grammatical construction

D. As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject
"would" doesn't correspond with "will expand" and "eventually eject," and the passive voice construction makes the actions of the Sun versus the hydrogen in the Sun's core unclear
E. As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jun 2015, 15:10
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souvik101990 wrote:
Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.

(A) Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting

(B) Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects

(C) As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting

(D) As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject

(E) As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject


(A) 'like' cannot be followed by a clause

(B) 'it' cannot refer to 'Sun', because 'Sun' is in possessive case and therefore is a an adjective rather than a noun. Hence, it refers to 'Sun's core', which is not the intended antecedent.

(C) The same issue as in B with 'it'

(D) The same issue as in B with 'it'

(E) Correct!
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2016, 22:41
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y as is prefferred to as ...we use LIKE for nouns and in this case star
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jul 2016, 09:44
OptimusPrepJanielle wrote:
Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its core, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.
Like is followed by nouns. Eliminate A

B. Like any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects "the sun" should follow "mass"

C. As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting "it" referent is unclear, use of the passive is not ideal, "eventually ejecting" is not the correct grammatical construction

D. As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun's core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject
"would" doesn't correspond with "will expand" and "eventually eject," and the passive voice construction makes the actions of the Sun versus the hydrogen in the Sun's core unclear
E. As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject






Hi,

I have a doubt regarding the answer e. if it stands for the sun then should it not be "ejects " ?singular verb for singular noun
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the   [#permalink] 15 Jul 2016, 09:44

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