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Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the

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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2018, 05:23
daagh GMATninja2 @abhimanha hazelnut mikemcgarry broall generis Vyshak
I have a doubt
any star is compared to the sun's core
any is adj the sun's adj
star is noun core is noun
What's wrong in this
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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2018, 07:39
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Teaserbae

Quote:
I have a doubt
any star is compared to the sun's core
any is adj the sun's adj
star is noun core is noun
What's wrong in this
Quote:



It is not clear which part of the question or the choice you are referring to. Nevertheless If any star is compared to the Star's core, then it is utterly wrong. A core is only the molten inner most part of the celestial body. There are more layers in a star including the Sun. Just because adjectives precede the words, the words themselves do not turn parallel and comparable
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Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2018, 13:15
teaserbae wrote:
daagh GMATninja2 @abhimanha hazelnut mikemcgarry broall generis Vyshak
I have a doubt
any star is compared to the sun's core
any is adj the sun's adj
star is noun core is y noun
What's wrong in this

teaserbae , I assume you refer to option E?
Quote:
(E) As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.

"Any" means "every" in this sentence.

The comparison is not between every star and "a" core.

The comparison is between EVERY star = ANY star and THE Sun.
The Sun is a star.

The Sun is like any star; X will happen to the star.
The Sun is like every star; X will happen to stars.

I'm not sure why you believe that the comparison is between a star and the core of the Sun. You appear to be emphasizing a noun compared to noun. True, a star is a noun -- but the Sun is also a noun. Would you please be specific about your confusion if daagh and I do not address your question?

1) "Core" is the object of a preposition, not the subject that performs the action in the dependent clause*

The preposition is "in."
The word "core" tells us the location of the hydrogen.
WHERE is the hydrogen (that the Sun uses up)? In the Sun's core.

Now, hydrogen is the object of the verb "exhausts."
WHAT gets exhausted, i.e., "used up"? Hydrogen.

And which subject performs the action (using up hydrogen)?
The Sun.

The Sun is the subject of both the dependent and the main clause.

2) The pronouns "its" and "it" refer back to the noun the "Sun."

Perhaps you believe that the eligible noun nearest to the pronoun must be the antecedent of the pronoun?

No. If a sentence contains a pronoun and more than one possible antecedent (i.e. the nouns and pronoun agree in number and gender), then the antecedent is the noun that makes logical sense or that fulfills the intended meaning of the sentence. Meaning is derived from context.

We are cued by "as would be the case with any star." That phrase signals a set of conditions in which all stars exist or through which all stars pass.

This sentence means

All stars including the Sun exhaust the hydrogen in their cores, expand into red giants, and eventually eject their outer envelope of gases to become white dwarfs.

I removed the singular pronouns to make the comparison between every star and the Sun clearer.

I hope the analysis helps. :-)

** Subordinate clause: "Once" is used as a subordinating conjunction. "Once" introduces a dependent clause that cannot stand on its own and that emphasizes the relatively more important main clause:
it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.

The dependent clause contains both a subject and a verb. "Sun" is the subject. "Exhausts" is the verb. The Sun performs the action of using up all of the hydrogen that is stored in the Sun's core. The possessive pronoun "its" must refer to Sun. The core doesn't possess the core. The Sun possesses the core. The pronoun "it" also refers to the Sun.

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Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Aug 2018, 03:34
daagh wrote:
Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its store, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting its outer envelope of gases to become a white dwarf.

A. Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the hydrogen in its store, it expands into a red giant, eventually ejecting--. Like for a clause is wrong;

B. Like any star of similar mas
s, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted, then it expands into a red giant and eventually ejects --- Comparing any star with the hydrogen -- wrong.


C. As in the case of any star of similar mass, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted, it will expand into a red giant, and eventually ejecting --- couple of errors herein. 1. comparing the case of a star with the hydrogen; 2.the unparallel " ejecting' phrase after 'and'

D. As any star of similar mass would, once the hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted it will expand into a red giant and will eventually eject --- 1. ambiguous referent of 'it' to mean hydrogen, 2. Just stopping with the auxiliary verb 'would' renders the subordinate clause a fragment

E. As would be the case with any star of similar mass, once the Sun exhausts the hydrogen in its core, it will expand into a red giant and eventually eject --The correct choice.


E looks correct except the verb eject - Don't you think it should be "ejects" and not eject as we are referring to Sun (singular)?
Re: Like any star of similar mass would do, once the Sun has exhausted the &nbs [#permalink] 09 Aug 2018, 03:34

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