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After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep

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After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Oct 2019, 22:39
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A
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C
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Question Stats:

35% (01:25) correct 65% (01:31) wrong based on 313 sessions

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Project SC Butler: Day 179: Sentence Correction (SC2)


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After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.

A) having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her

B) having finished a hard day's work, she felt sleep descend on her

C) sleep descended on her having finished a hard day's work

D) having finished a hard day's work, sleep had descended on her

E) having completed a hard day's work, sleep descended on her

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After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Oct 2019, 22:40
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OFFICIAL EXPLANATION

Project SC Butler: Day 179: Sentence Correction (SC2)



• This question is tricky because we must ensure two things:
1) Whatever happened After Junko lay down must make sense (the dependent clause "After Junko lay" gets its meaning from the main clause); and
2) having finished a hard day's work must modify something logical.

• Test strategy: Answers A and E are almost indistinguishable and that fact is a big hint that neither is correct.
If you chose (A), when you get to (E), its similarity to (A) should be a big warning: something got missed.

• Test strategy: whenever we having ___ED (verbED), we should remember that the words describe an event that is finished in the (usually recent) past and that the phrase typically is a cause whose effect will be stated in the sentence.

• I say more about sequence of events and the comparison in notes after the POE

THE PROMPT

Quote:
After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.


THE OPTIONS
Quote:
A) After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.

• After we read having finished a hard day's work, the next thing we should be reading about is a person
Sleep does not finish a hard day's work..
Eliminate A

Quote:
B) After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, she felt sleep descend on her like a soft blanket.

having finished a hard day's work describes an action completed by a person. In this sentence, she = Junko correctly follows the having finished . . . modifier.
• Although the phrasing is not in sequential order, the sequence makes sense because having finished a hard day's work (called the "perfect participle") happened in the recent past, after which Junko lay down, after which she felt sleep descend on her.
Like means similar to or resembling.
-- we can use like to point out that two things are similar (not the same) because they share characteristics.
-- Junko is very tired. As sleep comes to her (or overcomes her), sleep feels like a soft blanket [being laid over her]. At that point, sleep feels soft and comforting.
KEEP

Quote:
C) After Junko lay down, sleep descended on her having finished a hard day's work like a soft blanket.

having finished a hard day's work or a hard day's work is not like a soft blanket. Sleep is like a soft blanket.
Even if we do not quite understand the "like a blanket" simile, this phrase is nonsensical:
. . . having finished a hard day's work like a soft blanket. [How, exactly, does a soft blanket finish a hard day's work? A blanket does not do so. Wrong.
her having finished . . . is almost impossible to parse.
There are times when we do use a possessive in front of an ___ING word (a gerund, a verbING).
-- Correct: We made plans for dinner to celebrate his having opened his own business.
But in this option we have a preposition, ON. "Sleep descended on _____." On whom?
The preposition ON requires an object that makes sense.
-- her having finished a hard day's work does not make sense.
Sleep descended upon the fact that she had finished a a hard day's work? No. Wrong meaning.
Eliminate C

Quote:
D) After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep had descended on her like a soft blanket.

• as in (A) sleep does not finish a hard day's work.
had descended is incorrect. Sleep is the last-in-time event. Wrong verb.
-- had descended is past perfect, which we construct using [had + past participle (verbED)]
-- past perfect is called "the past of the past." The event depicted by that tense comes before some other event in the past.
-- the sequence is: (1) Junko finished a hard day's work, (2) Junko lay down, and (3) Junko felt sleep descend on her (like a soft blanket).
We do not use past perfect to describe that last-in-time event. Past perfect is for an action before another past action.
Eliminate D

Quote:
E) After Junko lay down, having completed a hard day's work, sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.

• just as is the case in (A), sleep did not complete a hard day's work. Junko did so.
Eliminate E

The correct answer is B

• NOTES

Meaning?
As usual, exc4libur is spot on.
This description is excellent..
exc4libur wrote
Quote:
MEANING: After Junko lay down, she fell asleep almost unnoticeably;
Who fell asleep and finished a day's work? Junko or she, not "sleep".
What do we do when a blanket descends on us? We feel it!
We are not comparing "how sleep descended" x "a soft blanket".
We are comparing the feeling of how sleep descended - it descended lightly, almost unnoticeably.


Sequence of events?

I will rewrite the sentence with time stamps, as I did in a post below, [urll=https://gmatclub.com/forum/after-junko-lay-down-having-finished-a-hard-day-s-work-sleep-308446.html#p2385355]here[/color][/url] in which I talked about the comparison a little more than I do in this post.
-- After Junko lay down at 2 a.m., having finished a hard day's work at 1 a.m., she felt sleep descend on her like a soft blanket at 2:15 a.m.
-- Sequence: 1) Junko finished a hard day's work; 2) Junko lay down; and 3) she felt sleep descend on her

Modifier HAVING + PAST PARTICIPLE (verbED)
-- this construction is called perfect participle.
-- Almost always, this construction describes a cause or condition and we hear about the effect in the sentence
Having drunk too much wine, he felt sleepy.
-- This construction also describes an event that is finished but relevant to the present.
-- You can read a little about perfect participles [color=#0000ff]here
.
-- Just understand that the phrasing (having verbED) almost always implies a cause and always indicates a finished event still relevant to the present

LIKE a soft blanket
-- Good writing includes this kind of comparison in small doses. It's called a simile. Don't memorize the word; understand what it is.

Like means similar to or resembling. A writer uses "like" is to show that two things are similar (but not the same) because they share qualities.

The objects of comparison are sleep [that, in descending, overcomes Junko], on one hand, and a blanket, on the other.
In particular, as exc4libur noted, we are comparing the way it feels when sleep descends to the way a soft blanket feels.
The writer is not saying that sleep and a blanket are the same. She is saying that in certain aspects they are similar.
She is saying that when Junko feels sleep descend (overcome her), that sleep feels similar to ("like") a blanket.

Cliche similes:
Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're gonna get.
Stars glittered like diamonds in the sky.

mykrasovski , you must be a Forrest Gump fan.
I had no idea that the "box of chocolates" simile came from that movie.
Confession: I have never seen the film. I suspect that you have. I'm glad I picked something relatable.

We are not looking for strict parallelism between the abstract noun sleep and the concrete noun blanket.
We are looking to see whether the comparison makes sense.

Strategy
eakabuah , this is at least the second time that you have noticed two nearly identical answers and because they were identical, rejected both.
Smart move.

This question appears deceptively simple.
In a way, it is simple. If we notice that having finished cannot refer to sleep, we eliminate A, D, and E.
Option C is a disaster.

On the other hand, the question is not simple because it uses simile and seemingly puts verbs out of order in the sentence.

COMMENTS

J2S2019 , I saw a good luck symbol today. I will give it to you and anyone else who takes the test soon.
(I figure that this symbol lasts for about a month. Wild guess.)

I hope this question and my explanation helped everyone to see that simple-looking questions may well be simple—just not in the way you originally thought.

It was brave to post, and everyone explained, even if a bad assumption sent a person to the wrong conclusion. Kudos to all.
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Re: After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2019, 00:42
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After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.

A) having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her

B) having finished a hard day's work, she felt sleep descend on her

C) sleep descended on her having finished a hard day's work

D) having finished a hard day's work, sleep had descended on her

E) having completed a hard day's work, sleep descended on her

Here in A,D,and E
Sleep is modifying the completion of that days work.Here SHE completed the work not sleep.Eliminate three of them.
we're left with B and C
OptionB : something wrong in the second part of the underlined portion. she felt sleep descend distorts the meaning of the sentence.
Were left with c, which is the correct answer.
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Re: After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2019, 05:11
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After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.

I think the correct answer should be B.

A) having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her
The modifier "having finished..." seems to be modifying "sleep. so, incorrect.

B) having finished a hard day's work, she felt sleep descend on her
Correct.

C) sleep descended on her having finished a hard day's work
The sentence "having finished a hard day's work like a soft blanket" does not make sense. Incorrect.

D) having finished a hard day's work, sleep had descended on her
Same as A. Also, use of past perfect is not right. Incorrect.

E) having completed a hard day's work, sleep descended on her
Same as A. Incorrect.
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Re: After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2019, 09:31
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generis wrote:
After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.

A) having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her
B) having finished a hard day's work, she felt sleep descend on her
C) sleep descended on her having finished a hard day's work
D) having finished a hard day's work, sleep had descended on her
E) having completed a hard day's work, sleep descended on her


MEANING: After J lay down, she felt asleep almost unnoticeably;
Who felt asleep and finished a day's work? J or she, not "sleep".
What do we do when a blanket descends on us? We feel it!
We are not comparing "how sleep descended" x "a soft blanket".
We are comparing the feeling of how sleep descended - it descended lightly, almost unnoticeably.

A) "having finished…" is mod sleep, unintended;
C) "sleep…having finished a day's work" unintended; "finished…like a blanket" not comp;
D) "having finished…" is mod sleep, unintended; "had descended" imps she felt sleep before she lay down, unintended;
E) "having completed…" is mod sleep, unintended;

Answer (B)
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Re: After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2019, 09:41
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After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.

A) having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her

B) having finished a hard day's work, she felt sleep descend on her

C) sleep descended on her having finished a hard day's work

D) having finished a hard day's work, sleep had descended on her

E) having completed a hard day's work, sleep descended on her

I confess i am struggling in SC now generis , need your help :cry: Only a few days remaining before my exam.

I have choosen E, though it is incorrect may be. The correct one should be B:dazed

My reasoning:-

I dont know what is the correct answer for this question & i have invested a hell lot of time figuring out which ones are wrong here.

First of all, "having finished a hard day's work".........VerbING modifier is modifying the preceding cluase "After Junko lay down" ---
seems no error as it is modifying what it is intended to do.

but if i take C as a whole sentence:-
After Junko lay down, sleep descended on her having finished a hard day's work like a soft blanket -
here VerbING Modifier "having" (participle) is used without ",", & in such case it modifes the nearest attached noun/pronoun - here "her"-- a possesive pronoun is refering back to Junko, correct - but the underlined portion at the end "like a soft blanket" is compared with "a hard day's work" - seems not correct

so i removed C from consideration.

Now, rest of the 4 choices starting with a same pattern.

Choice A & E

After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work,sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.
After Junko lay down, having completed a hard day's work, sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.

The only differnce is "finished" & "completed" - dont know how to eliminate one of them.

but moral of the story seems like

After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work,sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.

if we ignore the portion between two ",", then i found not a clear comparison "like a soft blanket"---it should compare with "Sleep"? :?

now what is the structure of the sentence, "sleep descended on her like a soft blanket." - is the main clause & "After Junko lay down" is the sub-ordinate clause??
then, "After Junko lay down" is it modifying "sleep"?? How come the usage is correct here.

D has a tense error, use of "had" is nowhere necessary as we are not comparing two past events here.


B - After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work,she felt sleep descend on herlike a soft blanket -

Here if "sleep descend" is compared with "soft blanket" then it makes sense.

Please help me, as you did always, i need your expert advise to move my SC % from 60 to 90 :(
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After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2019, 18:13
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J2S2019 wrote:
After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.

A) having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her

B) having finished a hard day's work, she felt sleep descend on her

C) sleep descended on her having finished a hard day's work

D) having finished a hard day's work, sleep had descended on her

E) having completed a hard day's work, sleep descended on her

I confess i am struggling in SC now generis , need your help :cry: Only a few days remaining before my exam.

I have choosen E, though it is incorrect may be. The correct one should be B:dazed

My reasoning:-

I dont know what is the correct answer for this question & i have invested a hell lot of time figuring out which ones are wrong here.

First of all, "having finished a hard day's work".........VerbING modifier is modifying the preceding cluase "After Junko lay down" ---
seems no error as it is modifying what it is intended to do.

but if i take C as a whole sentence:-
After Junko lay down, sleep descended on her having finished a hard day's work like a soft blanket -
here VerbING Modifier "having" (participle) is used without ",", & in such case it modifes the nearest attached noun/pronoun - here "her"-- a possesive pronoun is refering back to Junko, correct - but the underlined portion at the end "like a soft blanket" is compared with "a hard day's work" - seems not correct

so i removed C from consideration.

Now, rest of the 4 choices starting with a same pattern.

Choice A & E

After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work,sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.
After Junko lay down, having completed a hard day's work, sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.

The only differnce is "finished" & "completed" - dont know how to eliminate one of them.

but moral of the story seems like

After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work,sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.

if we ignore the portion between two ",", then i found not a clear comparison "like a soft blanket"---it should compare with "Sleep"? :?

now what is the structure of the sentence, "sleep descended on her like a soft blanket." - is the main clause & "After Junko lay down" is the sub-ordinate clause??
then, "After Junko lay down" is it modifying "sleep"?? How come the usage is correct here.

D has a tense error, use of "had" is nowhere necessary as we are not comparing two past events here.

B - After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work,she felt sleep descend on herlike a soft blanket -

Here if "sleep descend" is compared with "soft blanket" then it makes sense.

Please help me, as you did always, i need your expert advise to move my SC % from 60 to 90 :(

J2S2019 , this question is hard if you approach it without looking at the "big picture" and apply rules too mechanically.
At first you approached it mechanically.
That's okay. When nerves kick in, we often revert to what feels like more solid ground.

But then you stepped back a little. You found the key to one of three issues in this question. The issues are listed below.
You wrote, "Here if "sleep descend" is compared with "soft blanket" then it makes sense."
Yep.

Issue #1: Meaning and time sequence?

After Junko lay down is a subordinate clause, which depends on the main clause for its meaning.
After Junko lay down . . . what happened?

After she lay down, sleep descended on her or she felt sleep descend on her. (She fell asleep.)
The sentence is not this simple. A phrase intervenes.

After the introductory clause comes having finished a hard day's work . . .

having finished a hard day's work indicates a completed but recent action.
The phrase indicates sequence.
The having + participle (verbED ) happened first.
Junko did not lie down before she finished a hard day's work.
If I put time stamps in, the sentence will make more sense.
After Junko lay down at 2 a.m., having finished a hard day's work at 1 a.m., [something about sleep, which happens last, after she lay down 2 a.m.)

Issue #2: Modifier? What should having finished* [completed] a hard day's work modify?

You correctly note that having finished a hard day's work must refer to something logical.

After we read about having finished a hard day's work, what is the next thing we should be reading about?
A person.
A person finished a hard day's work.
A person lay down.

Issue #3: The comparison
You don't actually have to get to this issue if you deal with #2, the target of the modifier.

In the last-in-time event, an unusual comparison is made between sleep and a soft blanket.

Like means similar to or resembling.

The word "like" is used to show that two things are similar (but not the same) because they share qualities.

The objects of comparison are sleep or descending sleep, on one hand, and a blanket, on the other.

This comparison that you wonder about is called a simile.
Forget the jargon. Remember the idea.

Writers assert that one thing is "like" another when two dissimilar things share similar qualities.
The writer is not saying that sleep and a blanket are the same. She is saying that in certain aspects they are similar.
She is saying that in this circumstance, sleep or falling asleep is or feels similar to ("like") a blanket.

Cliche similes:
Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're gonna get.
Stars glittered like diamonds in the sky.

We are not looking for strict parallelism.
We are looking to see whether the comparison makes sense.
Can sleep, as it overtakes us, remind us of being covered by a blanket?

Call it. (You decide the answer to that question.)

Takeaway: two things must both happen
1) the "After Junko lay down" clause must have a main clause that finishes the meaning of the "after" clause
2) having finished/completed a hard day's work must refer to something logical.

I highlighted the portion in which you are on the right track.
You are correct not because we want to remove the having phrase (doing so leads to error in other options), but because you are onto the meaning of the sentence.

Try not to worry. You have prepared. You will do your best, and no one can ask for more than that.

Hope that helps. :)


*[Jargon: this construction is called a perfect participle.
Active: having + past participle (verbED)
Passive: having + BEEN + past participle)]
You can read a little about perfect participles here.

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Re: After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2019, 19:48
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generis wrote:
J2S2019 wrote:
After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.

A) having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her

B) having finished a hard day's work, she felt sleep descend on her

C) sleep descended on her having finished a hard day's work

D) having finished a hard day's work, sleep had descended on her

E) having completed a hard day's work, sleep descended on her

I confess i am struggling in SC now generis , need your help :cry: Only a few days remaining before my exam.

I have choosen E, though it is incorrect may be. The correct one should be B:dazed

My reasoning:-

I dont know what is the correct answer for this question & i have invested a hell lot of time figuring out which ones are wrong here.

First of all, "having finished a hard day's work".........VerbING modifier is modifying the preceding cluase "After Junko lay down" ---
seems no error as it is modifying what it is intended to do.

but if i take C as a whole sentence:-
After Junko lay down, sleep descended on her having finished a hard day's work like a soft blanket -
here VerbING Modifier "having" (participle) is used without ",", & in such case it modifes the nearest attached noun/pronoun - here "her"-- a possesive pronoun is refering back to Junko, correct - but the underlined portion at the end "like a soft blanket" is compared with "a hard day's work" - seems not correct

so i removed C from consideration.

Now, rest of the 4 choices starting with a same pattern.

Choice A & E

After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work,sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.
After Junko lay down, having completed a hard day's work, sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.

The only differnce is "finished" & "completed" - dont know how to eliminate one of them.

but moral of the story seems like

After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work,sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.

if we ignore the portion between two ",", then i found not a clear comparison "like a soft blanket"---it should compare with "Sleep"? :?

now what is the structure of the sentence, "sleep descended on her like a soft blanket." - is the main clause & "After Junko lay down" is the sub-ordinate clause??
then, "After Junko lay down" is it modifying "sleep"?? How come the usage is correct here.

D has a tense error, use of "had" is nowhere necessary as we are not comparing two past events here.

B - After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work,she felt sleep descend on herlike a soft blanket -

Here if "sleep descend" is compared with "soft blanket" then it makes sense.

Please help me, as you did always, i need your expert advise to move my SC % from 60 to 90 :(

J2S2019 , this question is hard if you approach it without looking at the "big picture" and apply rules too mechanically.
At first you approached it mechanically.
That's okay. When nerves kick in, we often revert to what feels like more solid ground.

But then you stepped back a little. You found the key to one of three issues in this question. The issues are listed below.
You wrote, "Here if "sleep descend" is compared with "soft blanket" then it makes sense."
Yep.

Issue #1: Meaning and time sequence?

After Junko lay down is a subordinate clause, which depends on the main clause for its meaning.
After Junko lay down . . . what happened?

After she lay down, sleep descended on her or she felt sleep descend on her. (She fell asleep.)
The sentence is not this simple. A phrase intervenes.

After the introductory clause comes having finished a hard day's work . . .

having finished a hard day's work indicates a completed but recent action.
The phrase indicates sequence.
The having + participle (verbED ) happened first.
Junko did not lie down before she finished a hard day's work.
If I put time stamps in, the sentence will make more sense.
After Junko lay down at 2 a.m., having finished a hard day's work at 1 a.m., [something about sleep, which happens last, after she lay down 2 a.m.)

Issue #2: Modifier? What should having finished* [completed] a hard day's work modify?

You correctly note that having finished a hard day's work must refer to something logical.

After we read about having finished a hard day's work, what is the next thing we should be reading about?
A person.
A person finished a hard day's work.
A person lay down.

Issue #3: The comparison
You don't actually have to get to this issue if you deal with #2, the target of the modifier.

In the last-in-time event, an unusual comparison is made between sleep and a soft blanket.

Like means similar to or resembling.

The word "like" is used two show that two things are similar (but not the same) because they share qualities.

The objects of comparison are sleep or descending sleep, on one hand, and a blanket, on the other.

This comparison that you wonder about is called a simile.
Forget the jargon. Remember the idea.

Writers assert that one thing is "like" another when two dissimilar things share similar qualities.
The writer is not saying that sleep and a blanket are the same. She is saying that in certain aspects they are similar.
She is saying that in this circumstance, sleep or falling asleep is or feels similar to ("like") a blanket.

Cliche similes:
Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're gonna get.
Stars glittered like diamonds in the sky.

We are not looking for strict parallelism.
We are looking to see whether the comparison makes sense.
Can sleep, as it overtakes us, remind us of being covered by a blanket?

Call it. (You decide the answer to that question.)

Takeaway: two things must both happen
1) the "After Junko lay down" clause must have a main clause that finishes the meaning of the "after" clause
2) having finished/completed a hard day's work must refer to something logical.

I highlighted the portion in which you are on the right track.
You are correct not because we want to remove the having phrase (doing so leads to error in other options), but because you are onto the meaning of the sentence.

Try not to worry. You have prepared. You will do your best, and no one can ask for more than that.

Hope that helps. :)


*[Jargon: this construction is called a perfect participle.
Active: having + past participle (verbED)
Passive: having + BEEN + past participle)]
You can read a little about perfect participles here.


Thanks a ton generis.

I understand now.
And thanks again for those last sentences. Hope to have a good exam day. Cheers!!

Posted from my mobile device
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After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2019, 19:53
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Quote:
Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're gonna get.


I love this quote :inlove:


J2S2019 good luck at your exam!
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Re: After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2019, 22:27
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This is a great question. I must admit my approach to SC questions has changed since I started following SC butler. Kudos to generis for this wonderful initiative especially for the detailed OEs and the answers to our queries. J2S2019 good luck in the exams. You will do well on the exams. Anxieties at the last hour are completely normal, but make sure it doesn't get the better of you.

After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.
A) having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her
B) having finished a hard day's work, she felt sleep descend on her
C) sleep descended on her having finished a hard day's work
D) having finished a hard day's work, sleep had descended on her
E) having completed a hard day's work, sleep descended on her

I can easily eliminate options C and D.
Option D: having finished a hard day's work rightly modifies Junko. However, the verb tense in the main clause is wrong. It is in the past perfect tense. If you logically consider the sequence of events, it is illogical to say that sleep had descended on Junko after she lay down. Under normal circumstances, one needs to first lie down before falling asleep. Based on this, I eliminated option D.

Option C: After Junko lay down, sleep descended on her having finished a hard day's work like a soft blanket. Option C is saying Junko finished a hard day's work like a soft blanket. I can't get my head around it. In the context, like is not appropriate for the comparison, in case the intention of the sentence is to compare soft blanket with how Junko finished her work. The more important issue is that like is part of the non-underlined text. Therefore, we cannot change like to as, so the structuring of option C is incorrect. I, therefore, eliminated option C.

We're left with three options. I asked myself, what is the difference between options A and E? completed vs finished. Is there a difference in meaning between Junko finished her day's work and Junko completed her day's work? Well, in my honest opinion, I don't see any difference. I stand to be corrected though. So if the two options are basically the same, surely both have to be wrong. I will leave the detailed analysis for generis to do :)

Option B is the right answer. As generis pointed out in his response to a query by J2S2019, the usage of like a soft blanket in the context of the sentence is a simile. So, the way Junko felt sleep descend on her is likened to a soft blanket.

PS: I am not sure on the decision between descend and descended. I would really appreciate it if Sir generis can throw some light on it for me. Of course, I am not ruling out the possibility of my answer being wrong :-D
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Re: After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2019, 22:41
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After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.



A) having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her

B) having finished a hard day's work, she felt sleep descend on her-- correct

C) sleep descended on her having finished a hard day's work --having finished a hard days work can't be like a soft blanket; only "sleep" descend like a soft blanket

D) having finished a hard day's work, sleep had descended on her

E) having completed a hard day's work, sleep descended on her

IMO, B
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Re: After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2019, 22:51
mykrasovski eakabuah
thanks for the wishes guys.
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Re: After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2019, 23:21
generis wrote:

Project SC Butler: Day 179: Sentence Correction (SC2)


For SC butler Questions Click Here



After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.

A) having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her

B) having finished a hard day's work, she felt sleep descend on her

C) sleep descended on her having finished a hard day's work

D) having finished a hard day's work, sleep had descended on her

E) having completed a hard day's work, sleep descended on her


Here if we see the sentence as a whole by its meaning, we have two activities one after the other.

Activity 1 : 'Junko lay down'
Activity 2 : 'sleep descended'

Now these two are connected and activity 1 comes before activity 2.

As we have activity 1 in simple past and it is not part of the underlined portion, therefore to maintain correct tenses we should have activity 2 in Simple present.
Hence 'descend'.

Only answer that matches is Option B.

Hence B
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Re: After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2019, 23:52
After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her like a soft blanket.

'having finished a hard day's work' is modifying Junko, which only in B has a pronoun 'she' that refers to Junko.

A) having finished a hard day's work, sleep descended on her

B) having finished a hard day's work, she felt sleep descend on her - CORRECT

C) sleep descended on her having finished a hard day's work

D) having finished a hard day's work, sleep had descended on her

E) having completed a hard day's work, sleep descended on her
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Re: After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Oct 2019, 00:39
I have posted the official explanation here.
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After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Oct 2019, 09:00
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generis yes you are right, I love Forrest Gump. It is a nice and wise movie, so I recommend to watch it when you get time.

Thanks for a great OE. If my memory serves me well, this is the first time when I answered both SC Butler questions incorrectly... So, I look forward to reading the explanations.
Have a good weekend.
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After Junko lay down, having finished a hard day's work, sleep   [#permalink] 19 Oct 2019, 09:00
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