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Although the first pulsar, or rapidly spinning collapsed star, to be

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Although the first pulsar, or rapidly spinning collapsed star, to be  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 21 Jun 2019, 03:30
Hi

I got the question correct. However, I have a small doubt regarding the usage of past perfect tense. Here the observation happened before the announcement and this sequence is pretty clear. My only take why the past perfect tense is not used in choice D is that the years in the choice clearly indicate the sequence and hence the usage of Past Perfect tense became optional. Had the years in which the observation and the announcement happened not been here, answer choice D would be wrong for not using Past Perfect tense.

Can someone please clarify whether my understanding is correct?

Thanks
Harsh

Originally posted by Harsh9676 on 21 Jun 2019, 03:09.
Last edited by Harsh9676 on 21 Jun 2019, 03:30, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Although the first pulsar, or rapidly spinning collapsed star, to be  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jun 2019, 03:26
Hi Harsh, here D is the right answer (not C).

Here, since the observation and the announcement both occurred at specific times in the past, the usage of simple past is more appropriate.
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Re: Although the first pulsar, or rapidly spinning collapsed star, to be  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Sep 2019, 02:18
sayantanc2k wrote:
DeepikaV wrote:
In the option c, is it not correct to use ' had not been announced before/until 1968' ? because to emphasize that ' announcement' has not been made before 1968. 'no announcement' is before 1968 so i thought it should be past perfect tense. i understand first sighting in 1967 and then announcement in 1968 . so, use of past perfect for announcement is wrong. but, without the first clause is it right to use past perfect for the second clause?


Use of past perfect is redundant when using "before".
Correct: I left home before my father arrived.
Wrong: I had left home before my father arrived.

The following is an excerpt from Manhattan SC guide:

"Note that we do not always use the Past Perfect for earlier actions. In general, you should use Past Perfect only to clarify or emphasize a sequence of past events. The earlier event should somehow have a bearing on the context of the later event. Moreover, if the sequence is already obvious, we often do not need Past Perfect.

Laura LOCKED the deadbolt before she LEFT for work."


my friends do not follow this rule ....in OG some correct answer choice THAT you can find with using had and before/after at same time
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Re: Although the first pulsar, or rapidly spinning collapsed star, to be  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Sep 2019, 12:12
EducationAisle wrote:
smartyguy wrote:
what is wrong with E please explain ?? :roof

E says: The first sighted pulsar, or rapidly spinning collapsed star, was not announced until February, 1968, while it was observed in the summer of 1967 by graduate student Jocelyn Bell.

So, it basically says: The first sighted pulsar was not announced until February, 1968

It is nonsensical to say that pulsar was not announced; pulsar cannot be announced/unannounced.

Actually the observation/discovery (about the sighting of pulsar) was not announced until February, 1968. This is what E says.


Let us assume option E was provided as below:
E. The discovery of the first sighted pulsar, or rapidly spinning collapsed star, was not announced until February, 1968, while it was observed in the summer of 1967 by graduate student Jocelyn Bell.

Then can we say E is the correct answer choice for this question?
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Although the first pulsar, or rapidly spinning collapsed star, to be  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Oct 2019, 09:29
Hi GMATNinja and daagh

I have a question about tenses here. I went through all the posts, but I'm still a little confused. Why are we not using past perfect tense "had not been announced"?

There are three events here:
(1) The sighting in 1967
(2) The announcement
(3) The time marker February 1968

If that's the case, shouldn't the announcement be in past perfect relative to February 1968?

I'm saying this with reference to the following OG examples:

(1) Less than 35 years after the release of African honeybees outside Sao Paulo, Brazil, their descendants, popularly known as killer bees, had migrated as far north as southern Texas.

(2) Around 1900, fishermen in the Chesapeake Bay area landed more than seventeen million pounds of shad in a single year, but by 1920, over-fishing and the proliferation of milldams and culverts that blocked shad from migrating up their spawning streams had reduced landings to less than four million pounds.

The only difference I can see is that in the examples (1) and (2) above, the events we have denoted in the past perfect tense ("had migrated" and "had reduced") happened before the time third time marker ("35 years" and "1920") and are now completed.

Whereas "the announcement" did not happen until February 1968, i.e. it either happened sometime in February 1968, or happened after February 1968. Which means we won't need past perfect tense. Does this make sense?

I'm not very convinced though. Request your help. Really appreciate it. Thank you.
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Re: Although the first pulsar, or rapidly spinning collapsed star, to be  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Oct 2019, 10:36
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Aditya

Quote:
(D) The first pulsar, or rapidly spinning collapsed star, to be sighted was observed in the summer of 1967 by graduate student Jocelyn Bell, but the discovery was not announced until February 1968

I am not quite clear about your point. I presume that you are willing to concede D as the choice but not with conviction about the use of simple past tenses for both the events. One must use past perfect for the first part because it is an earlier event and past perfect for the later announcement because it comes with a time reference as in the other OG questions cited by you

Yet again you state " Which means we won't need past perfect tense" . Both stances are contradictory. Aren't they? Please advise whether you vote for past perfect or simple past in the given case.
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Re: Although the first pulsar, or rapidly spinning collapsed star, to be  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Oct 2019, 10:59
Hi daagh. Thank you for the prompt reply.

Yes, you understood my question perfectly. I'm trying to figure out why past perfect tense "had announced" is wrong? I understand that among the answer choices, the ones that use past perfect tense are incorrect for other reasons. But if they weren't, would we prefer past perfect tense over simple past tense? This question came to me because I instantly connected the structure of the sentence to the OG examples I cited. They seem very similar to me.

As for the last paragraph and saying "Which means we won't need past perfect tense" - this was me trying to come up with a reason why we can't use past perfect tense. I'm not very confident of my explanation, hence thought of writing this post.

Hope this clarifies things. Looking forward to your reply. Thank you again.
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Re: Although the first pulsar, or rapidly spinning collapsed star, to be  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Oct 2019, 12:31
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Adithya

I am afraid that you are mistaking a convention for a rule. That you have to use a past perfect for an earlier event is a style. However, it does not mean that you should use a past perfect everyday e even if the sequence of chronology is made clear otherwise by the mention of an earlier year or a word such as before. One can challenge that this is not the inkling of GMAT, because if it were so, D could not have been marked as the OA. In other words, this is the way of saying that what we assume as a rule is not a rule.
That is the reason choice D does not use the past perfect for the discovery.
Why D does not use past perfect for the second point? Because it is the later event
Your OG choices:
1. "Less than 35 years after the release of African honeybees outside Sao Paulo, Brazil, their descendents, popularly known as killer bees, had migrated as far north as Southern Texas."
Why this choice is using the past perfect for the later event?
According to Ron, this is just a reported speech of a normal present tense sentence such as follows.
"Less than 35 years after the release of African honeybees outside Sao Paulo, Brazil, their descendents, popularly known as killer bees, have migrated as far north as Southern Texas"
When you convert it into a past tense, the 'have migrated' present perfect becomes 'had migrated'. That is all to this question.

(2) Around 1900, anglers in the Chesapeake Bay area landed more than seventeen million pounds of shad in a single year, but by 1920, over-fishing and the proliferation of milldams and culverts that blocked shad from migrating up their spawning streams had reduced landings to less than four million pounds.

The same reasoning as in the honeybees' case. If you wrote that sentence in 1920, you would have said '' by 1920, over-fishing and the proliferation of milldams and culverts that blocked shad from migrating up their spawning streams have reduced landings to less than four million pounds-" Now convert it into a sentence as of now, and you would write 'had reduced' instead of have reduced.

HTH
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Re: Although the first pulsar, or rapidly spinning collapsed star, to be   [#permalink] 16 Oct 2019, 12:31

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