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An international team of astronomers working at telescopes

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I was having trouble with the idiom 'estimated to be' on  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 29 Aug 2013, 21:09
3
6
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

67% (01:20) correct 33% (00:00) wrong based on 9 sessions

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I was having trouble with the idiom 'estimated to be' on this one.
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Originally posted by jjhko on 21 Aug 2006, 05:49.
Last edited by fameatop on 29 Aug 2013, 21:09, edited 1 time in total.
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New post 21 Aug 2006, 06:00
The answer should be (A). I couldn`t recognize the idiom, so I used the modifier rule here. Jupiter, .....
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New post 21 Aug 2006, 06:01
1
Just by the last part of the sentance, we know that the underlined part must end in "Jupiter"

This leaves only A,C and D.

C - the "is" and "having" is incorrect

Between A and D, A uses the correct plural form "have" to describe the 18 spheres.

Therefore A
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New post 21 Aug 2006, 06:05
Picking A.
A----> Right modifier--Correct SVA, keep it.
B----> Wrong. "the solar system's largest planet" modifies "Jupiter's Mass"
C----> "having detected" is wrong here.
D----> "astronomers,........, and has detected". No "and" required.
E----> Worst of them all. "they have" is totally wrong here.
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New post 21 Aug 2006, 10:11
1
A.

I think idiom "estimate to" is right way than saying estimate at .

Any thought.
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New post 21 Aug 2006, 11:22
A for right modifier for Jupitor and correct idiom --- estimated to have (be)
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New post 22 Aug 2006, 06:24
The OA is A. I got fixed to looking for 'to be' but 'to have' is the same thing.
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An international team of astronomers working at telescopes  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Nov 2006, 16:16
An international team of astronomers working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain has detected at least 18 huge gas spheres estimated to have 5 to 15 times the mass of Jupiter, the solar system's largest planet.

A. astronomers working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain has detected at least 18 huge gas spheres estimated to have 5 to 15 times the mass of Jupiter,

B. astronomers working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain has detected at least 18 huge gas spheres estimated to have 5 to 15 times Jupiter's mass,

C. astronomers is working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain, having detected at least 18 huge gas spheres that are estimated at 5 to 15 times the mass of Jupiter,

D. astronomers, working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain, and has detected at least 18 huge gas spheres estimated at 5 to 15 times the mass of Jupiter,

E. astronomers, working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain has detected at least 18 huge gas spheres they have estimated to be 5 to 15 ties Jupiter's mass,
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New post 12 Nov 2006, 16:23
I pick A

B - Solar System's Largest planet is not referring to Jupitor's Mass
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New post 12 Nov 2006, 19:32
A. astronomers working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain has detected at least 18 huge gas spheres estimated to have 5 to 15 times the mass of Jupiter,

B. bad comparison -> comparing mass with planet

C. makes it sound like the astronomers are working because of the detection of hugh gas spheres...

D. awkward sentence

E. same problem as B

A is best.
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New post 12 Nov 2006, 19:40
Thanks. I missed the comparison problem in B. OA is A.
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An international team of astronomers  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jun 2015, 00:42
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An international team of astronomers working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain has detected at least 18 huge gas spheres estimated to have 5 to 15 times the mass of Jupiter, the solar system’s largest planet.

(A) astronomers working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain has detected at least 18 huge gas spheres estimated to have 5 to 15 times the mass of Jupiter

(B) astronomers working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain has detected at least 18 huge gas spheres estimated to be 5 to 15 times Jupiter’s mass

(C) astronomers is working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain, having detected at least 18 huge gas spheres that are estimated at 5 to 15 times the mass of Jupiter

(D) astronomers, working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain, and has detected at least 18 huge gas spheres estimated at 5 to 15 times the mass of Jupiter

(E) astronomers, working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain, has detected at least 18 huge gas spheres they have estimated to be 5 to 15 times Jupiter’s mass
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Re: An international team of astronomers  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jun 2015, 01:46
Was confused between A and E. But when I look at E, it says: 5 to 15 times Jupiter’s mass, the solar system’s largest planet.

So, the meaning coming out is that the "mass" of Jupiter (and not Jupiter itself) is the solar system’s largest planet.

Is my understanding correct?
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Re: An international team of astronomers  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jun 2015, 02:23
I dont see anything wrong with Option A but E is definitely wrong in at least two aspects. See below.

astronomers, working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain, has detected at least 18 huge gas spheres they have estimated to be 5 to 15 times Jupiter’s mass

1. To who 'They' referring to, the gas sphere or the team of scientists.

2. If we assume they is referring to the team of scientists, then THEY should be it as the word Team is Singular.

3. the last clause...'has detected' has no subject. The team of astrnomers cannot be subject of two verbs at the same time.

(Moderators please correct me if wrong. )

Hope this helps.


gmatgrl wrote:
Was confused between A and E. But when I look at E, it says: 5 to 15 times Jupiter’s mass, the solar system’s largest planet.

So, the meaning coming out is that the "mass" of Jupiter (and not Jupiter itself) is the solar system’s largest planet.

Is my understanding correct?

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Re: An international team of astronomers  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jun 2015, 20:17
shriramvelamuri wrote:
I dont see anything wrong with Option A but E is definitely wrong in at least two aspects. See below.

astronomers, working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain, has detected at least 18 huge gas spheres they have estimated to be 5 to 15 times Jupiter’s mass

1. To who 'They' referring to, the gas sphere or the team of scientists.

2. If we assume they is referring to the team of scientists, then THEY should be it as the word Team is Singular.

3. the last clause...'has detected' has no subject. The team of astrnomers cannot be subject of two verbs at the same time.

(Moderators please correct me if wrong. )

Hope this helps.


gmatgrl wrote:
Was confused between A and E. But when I look at E, it says: 5 to 15 times Jupiter’s mass, the solar system’s largest planet.

So, the meaning coming out is that the "mass" of Jupiter (and not Jupiter itself) is the solar system’s largest planet.

Is my understanding correct?


Hi shriramvelamuri,

In 'E' , "has detected" definitely has a subject and that is "team". The main problem with E is that its a run on. Two independent clauses(IC) i.e. "An international team has... " and "They have..", are not joined correctly. IC can only be connected by conjunction or semicolon.

Thanks!
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Re: An international team of astronomers  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jun 2015, 21:39
gmatgrl wrote:
Was confused between A and E. But when I look at E, it says: 5 to 15 times Jupiter’s mass, the solar system’s largest planet.

So, the meaning coming out is that the "mass" of Jupiter (and not Jupiter itself) is the solar system’s largest planet.

Is my understanding correct?


Hi,

You are correct. One easy way to eliminate E is to see that "the solar system’s largest planet" correctly modifies "Jupiter" and not its mass.

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Re: An international team of astronomers  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jun 2015, 21:06
(A) astronomers working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain has detected at least 18 huge gas spheres estimated to have 5 to 15 times the mass of Jupiter
This looks correct, "working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain" correctly describes a team. Singular verb "Has" is perfect for singular subject " Team". Non underline part correctly describes "Jupiter"
Keep this option aside,


(B) astronomers working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain has detected at least 18 huge gas spheres estimated to be 5 to 15 times Jupiter’s mass
This ends with "Jupiter’s mass", now non underlined part describes "Jupiter’s mass" and this changes meaning - Incorrect

(C) astronomers is working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain, having detected at least 18 huge gas spheres that are estimated at 5 to 15 times the mass of Jupiter
this is like a run on sentence " having detected at least 18 huge gas spheres" is not the action, whereas as per the actual meaning it should be action of the team
Incorrect

(D) astronomers, working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain, and has detected at least 18 huge gas spheres estimated at 5 to 15 times the mass of Jupiter

IC [AND] IC is correct, but is the first part "working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain" an IC ? it is not, it does not contain any verb. Famous missing verb error
Incorrect


(E) astronomers, working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain, has detected at least 18 huge gas spheres they have estimated to be 5 to 15 times Jupiter’s mass
This ends with "Jupiter’s mass", now non underlined part describes "Jupiter’s mass" and this changes meaning - Incorrect


Option A,
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Re: An international team of astronomers  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jun 2015, 21:50
The non-underlined portion "the solar system’s largest planet" will modify:
1) Jupiter
2) OR Jupiter's mass
Correct choice is 1), so B) and E) are out.

(A) astronomers working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain has detected at least 18 huge gas spheres estimated to have 5 to 15 times the mass of Jupiter
"Team.. has detected" Correct SV pair.

(C) astronomers is working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain, having detected at least 18 huge gas spheres that are estimated at 5 to 15 times the mass of Jupiter
"having detected" seems to express the how of the verb "is working", but that is incorrect construction. The team was working and the team detected some stuff. They are independent events.

(D) astronomers, working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain, and has detected at least 18 huge gas spheres estimated at 5 to 15 times the mass of Jupiter

After fitting this choice, the sentence becomes:
Part 1: An international team of astronomers [,working at telescopes in the Canary Islands and Spain]
Part 2: ,and has detected at least 18 huge gas spheres estimated at 5 to 15 times the mass of Jupiter [,the solar system’s largest planet.]

Problem with this sentence:
Part 1 has NO verb for the subject "An international team of astronomers"
Part 2 has ",and" implying co-ordinating function of and. However, there is no Subject for the verb "has detected"

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New post 16 Jul 2015, 07:13
estimated to be is the right idiom. Choice A) has estimated to have. Is that right ?
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New post 16 Jul 2015, 21:10
Hi Shyind,

Your question was really intriguing. Found a good explanation by Ron Purewal of MGMAT here:

https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/foru ... t2002.html

Though there is no thumb rule I guess. Your doubts look pretty solid.. :thumbup:

Regards,
Dom.
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Re: An international team of astronomers   [#permalink] 16 Jul 2015, 21:10

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