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Analogy

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Intern
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Joined: 02 Oct 2008
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Analogy [#permalink]

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New post 23 Oct 2008, 23:15
From time to time, the press indulges in outbursts of indignation over the use of false or misleading information by the U.S. government in support of its policies and programs. No one endorses needless deception. But consider this historical analogy. It is known that Christopher Columbus, on his first voyage to the New World, deliberately falsified the log to show a shorter sailing distance for each day out than the ships had actually traveled. In this way, Columbus was able to convince his skeptical sailors that they had not sailed past the point at which they expected to find the shores of India. Without this deception, Columbus's sailors might well have mutinied, and the New World might never have been discovered.

10. The author of the passage above assumes each of the following EXCEPT:

(A) Government deception of the press is often motivated by worthy objectives.

(B) Without government deception, popular support for worthwhile government policies and programs might well fade.

(C) Attacks on the government by the press are often politically motivated.

(D) Deception for deception's sake should not be condoned.(C)

(E) A greater good may sometimes require acceptance of a lesser evil.

11. Which of the following is the main weakness of the historical analogy drawn in the passage above?

(A) The sailors in Columbus's crew never knew that they had been deceived, while government deception is generally uncovered by the press.

(B) A ship's log is a record intended mainly for use by the captain, while press reports are generally disseminated for use by the public at large.

(C) The members of a ship's crew are selected by the captain of the ship, while those who work in the press are self-selected.

(D) The crew of a ship is responsible for the success of a voyage, while the press is not responsible for the use others make of the factual information it publishes.(E)

(E) In a democracy, the people are expected to participate in the nation's political decision making, while the members of a ship's crew are expected simply to obey the orders of the captain.

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Re: Analogy [#permalink]

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New post 23 Oct 2008, 23:26
abhinav24 wrote:
From time to time, the press indulges in outbursts of indignation over the use of false or misleading information by the U.S. government in support of its policies and programs. No one endorses needless deception. But consider this historical analogy. It is known that Christopher Columbus, on his first voyage to the New World, deliberately falsified the log to show a shorter sailing distance for each day out than the ships had actually traveled. In this way, Columbus was able to convince his skeptical sailors that they had not sailed past the point at which they expected to find the shores of India. Without this deception, Columbus's sailors might well have mutinied, and the New World might never have been discovered.


10. The author of the passage above assumes each of the following EXCEPT:

(A) Government deception of the press is often motivated by worthy objectives.

(B) Without government deception, popular support for worthwhile government policies and programs might well fade.

(C) Attacks on the government by the press are often politically motivated.

(D) Deception for deception's sake should not be condoned.(C)

(E) A greater good may sometimes require acceptance of a lesser evil.

11. Which of the following is the main weakness of the historical analogy drawn in the passage above?

(A) The sailors in Columbus's crew never knew that they had been deceived, while government deception is generally uncovered by the press.

(B) A ship's log is a record intended mainly for use by the captain, while press reports are generally disseminated for use by the public at large.

(C) The members of a ship's crew are selected by the captain of the ship, while those who work in the press are self-selected.

(D) The crew of a ship is responsible for the success of a voyage, while the press is not responsible for the use others make of the factual information it publishes.(E)

(E) In a democracy, the people are expected to participate in the nation's political decision making, while the members of a ship's crew are expected simply to obey the orders of the captain.




lets see...C and E?

you left the answers in the stem

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Re: Analogy [#permalink]

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New post 23 Oct 2008, 23:51
ohh i m sorry for that !!!
But please can you explain how are they C and E ?

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Re: Analogy [#permalink]

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New post 24 Oct 2008, 09:40
abhinav24 wrote:
From time to time, the press indulges in outbursts of indignation over the use of false or misleading information by the U.S. government in support of its policies and programs. No one endorses needless deception. But consider this historical analogy. It is known that Christopher Columbus, on his first voyage to the New World, deliberately falsified the log to show a shorter sailing distance for each day out than the ships had actually traveled. In this way, Columbus was able to convince his skeptical sailors that they had not sailed past the point at which they expected to find the shores of India. Without this deception, Columbus's sailors might well have mutinied, and the New World might never have been discovered.

10. The author of the passage above assumes each of the following EXCEPT:

(A) Government deception of the press is often motivated by worthy objectives.

Without this deception, Columbus's sailors might well have mutinied, and the New World might never have been discovered. By using such analogy the author is assuming A

(B) Without government deception, popular support for worthwhile government policies and programs might well fade.

Without this deception, Columbus's sailors might well have mutinied. makes room for assumption B

(C) Attacks on the government by the press are often politically motivated.

No where passage says this

(D) Deception for deception's sake should not be condoned.

No one endorses needless deception. forms basis for D

(E) A greater good may sometimes require acceptance of a lesser evil.

Columbus was able to convince his skeptical sailors that they had not sailed past the point at which they expected to find the shores of India. Makes the case for E

11. Which of the following is the main weakness of the historical analogy drawn in the passage above?

(A) The sailors in Columbus's crew never knew that they had been deceived, while government deception is generally uncovered by the press.

(B) A ship's log is a record intended mainly for use by the captain, while press reports are generally disseminated for use by the public at large.

(C) The members of a ship's crew are selected by the captain of the ship, while those who work in the press are self-selected.

(D) The crew of a ship is responsible for the success of a voyage, while the press is not responsible for the use others make of the factual information it publishes.(E)

(E) In a democracy, the people are expected to participate in the nation's political decision making, while the members of a ship's crew are expected simply to obey the orders of the captain.


The main weakness is comparing a historical event that has no political/democratic issues to one such issue. Hiding information is the commonality the passage alludes to, but the two cases are not comparable just because both had a situation in which information was hidden. Both of them fall under different realms

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Re: Analogy   [#permalink] 24 Oct 2008, 09:40
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