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Are these constructions right? - he is required to attend

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Are these constructions right? - he is required to attend  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jan 2012, 10:51
1
Are these constructions right?

- he is required to attend the court breifing
- it is required that he attend the court breifing
- the court requires him to attend the court breifing
- the court requires that he attend the court..

Thanks
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
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Re: Subjunctives  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jan 2012, 12:05
1
Hi, there. I'm happy to give my 2 cents on this. :)

First of all, yes, all four of those are grammatically correct --- all four are error-free.

Now, the more pertinent question -- how would the GMAT compare them relative to each other. Remember, GMAT SC is based on three criteria:
(a) grammar
(b) unambiguity
(c) directness & concision

All four pass the grammar check with flying colors. None of the four of them has any ambiguity: they are all perfectly clear.

The third criterion, though, does distinguish among them.

The second, "it is required that he attend the court briefing" is indirect and passive --- yuck. The GMAT does not like that at all.

The first, "he is required to attend the court briefing" is passive, generally not preferred, although it may be necessary for the overall structure of the sentence, e.g. "The oafish misanthrope who punched a crossing guard is now required to attend the court briefing about the incident."

The latter two are both active, both 100% perfectly acceptable. If the GMAT SC were asking you to distinguish between the two of them, it could only be through something like parallelism ---- for example:

"After his seven bar fight, the court required that he attend the court briefing and to do 200 hours of community service."

OK, that's a horrible sentence, but the idea is: while the underlined clause is completely acceptable in and of itself, it's not in parallel with the second part of the sentence. The second part has an infinitive "to do", so the underlined part should be changed to something with an infinitive ---- for example, "the court required him to attend the court briefing." The infinitive "to attend" is now correctly in parallel with the infinitive "to do."

Does all this make sense? Please let me know if you have any questions on what I've said.

Mike :)
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Mike McGarry
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Re: Subjunctives  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jan 2012, 20:13
Thanks Mike..

Just 1 query i read in the MGMAT that Require is a bossy verb that always takes that .. Any thoughts

Please take a look at this sentence

Legislation in the Canadian province of Ontario requires of both public and private employers that pay be the same for jobs historically held by women as for jobs requiring comparable skill that are usually held by men.

An alternate construction to this is
Legislation in the Canadian province of Ontario requires of both public and private employers to pay the same

What about this.
Legislation in the Canadian province of Ontario requires that both public and private employers pay the same

Thanks in advance
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
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Re: Subjunctives  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jan 2012, 09:10
I am not sure of what you read in MGAMT -- I'd love to see it. My understanding is: the word "require" can be followed by [object] + [infinitive], or can be followed by [that] + [clause in subjunctive]. The combination "require of" does need a "that", not a "to" --- is that what you read about?

So your three sentences:

1) Legislation in the Canadian province of Ontario requires of both public and private employers that pay be the same for jobs historically held by women as for jobs requiring comparable skill that are usually held by men.

A bit fancy and highfalutin, perhaps a bit wordy, but grammatically correct.

2) Legislation in the Canadian province of Ontario requires of both public and private employers to pay the same for jobs historically held by women as for jobs requiring comparable skill that are usually held by men.

The infinitive is fine, but the word "of" is incorrect:
The teacher requires me to do my homework. = correct
The teacher requires of me to do my homework. = incorrect & awkward

Again, when you use the word "of" after require, you can't use an infinitive -- then you have to use a clause beginning with "that."

3) Legislation in the Canadian province of Ontario requires that both public and private employers pay the same for jobs historically held by women as for jobs requiring comparable skill that are usually held by men.

Perfectly correct, clear, and direct. Perhaps the best of the three.

Does all that make sense?

Mike :-)
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Mike McGarry
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Re: Are these constructions right? - he is required to attend  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jan 2019, 00:03
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

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Re: Are these constructions right? - he is required to attend   [#permalink] 24 Jan 2019, 00:03
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