GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 22 Feb 2019, 04:25

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in February
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
272829303112
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
242526272812
Open Detailed Calendar
  • Free GMAT RC Webinar

     February 23, 2019

     February 23, 2019

     07:00 AM PST

     09:00 AM PST

    Learn reading strategies that can help even non-voracious reader to master GMAT RC. Saturday, February 23rd at 7 AM PT
  • FREE Quant Workshop by e-GMAT!

     February 24, 2019

     February 24, 2019

     07:00 AM PST

     09:00 AM PST

    Get personalized insights on how to achieve your Target Quant Score.

Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its san

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

 
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 30 Mar 2009
Posts: 212
Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its san  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 26 Jan 2019, 01:13
2
1
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  25% (medium)

Question Stats:

59% (00:38) correct 41% (00:40) wrong based on 232 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its sandy beaches and multiple opportunities for sports, had been one of the most popular resort destinations on the East Coast.


A. had been

B. has been

C. had been being

D. was being

E. was

What is the problem in A ? Because I think past perfect is necessary as by using simple past distorts the meaning

Originally posted by Minheequang on 08 May 2009, 07:38.
Last edited by Bunuel on 26 Jan 2019, 01:13, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
Most Helpful Community Reply
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 25 Jul 2009
Posts: 249
Re: Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its san  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Mar 2010, 23:21
5
IMO E. This will be a big trap for anyone who automatically applies past perfect tense. Because if the answer choice were (A), it would be too easy to qualified to be a Gmat question. So, lets think that the test makers wouldn't be so good that they could give us such a chance to score an easy point

Back to the main point, we can completely apply past simple here because the attractiveness of a tourist spot is not only a simple action happened before another action in the past, but it is indeed a so-called trade-mark of a place. So, it's like an unchanged-thing in the past rather than a spontaneous action in the past


Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its sandy beaches and multiple opportunities for sports, had been one of the most popular resort destinations on the East Coast.


1.had been
2. has been
3. had been being
4. was being
5. was
General Discussion
Board of Directors
User avatar
P
Joined: 01 Sep 2010
Posts: 3352
Re: Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its san  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Jan 2011, 15:09
here we need verb agreement: we have destroyed........that indicate a tense totally gone. finished. it's over

so, E is the right answer. if you ahve doubt on this, maybe a problem with question much more difficult

You must think on this question not more than ten seconds ;)
_________________

COLLECTION OF QUESTIONS AND RESOURCES
Quant: 1. ALL GMATPrep questions Quant/Verbal 2. Bunuel Signature Collection - The Next Generation 3. Bunuel Signature Collection ALL-IN-ONE WITH SOLUTIONS 4. Veritas Prep Blog PDF Version 5. MGMAT Study Hall Thursdays with Ron Quant Videos
Verbal:1. Verbal question bank and directories by Carcass 2. MGMAT Study Hall Thursdays with Ron Verbal Videos 3. Critical Reasoning_Oldy but goldy question banks 4. Sentence Correction_Oldy but goldy question banks 5. Reading-comprehension_Oldy but goldy question banks

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 10 Jun 2010
Posts: 12
Re: Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its san  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Jan 2011, 01:12
In my opinion, (A) is not wrong, but when we compared (A) with (E), (A) is more redundant than (E) because the use of "before" in the sentence has shown the order of different time. That's why (E) is better than (A).
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 03 Mar 2010
Posts: 372
Schools: Simon '16 (M$)
Re: Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its san  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Jul 2011, 10:37
Manhattan's rule for using Past Perfect:

1. Past Perfect is used to clarify or emphasize a sequence of past events. The earlier event should somehow have a bearing on the context of the later event.
2. The words "before" and "after" indicate the sequence of events clearly and emphatically enough to make the use of the Past Perfect unnecessary.


angel2009 wrote:
Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its sandy beaches and multiple opportunities for sports, had been one of the most popular resort destinations on the East Coast.

* had been
* has been
* had been being
* was being
* was


Before here clearly indicates the sequence of events. Town was most popular and then storm destroyed the town.
Hence use of HAD BEEN is unwarranted in this situation. Simple Past Tense will should be used.

OA E.
_________________

My dad once said to me: Son, nothing succeeds like success.

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 29 Dec 2012
Posts: 48
Re: Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its san  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Feb 2013, 07:32
Quote:

Before here clearly indicates the sequence of events. Town was most popular and then storm destroyed the town.
Hence use of HAD BEEN is unwarranted in this situation. Simple Past Tense will should be used.


Is it a real thing ? I mean, from my understanding, it does not matter whether the sequence of events is already clear or not, as a grammatical rule you SHOULD use past perfect to refer to an event which happens before another one and both events are somehow related. I think had been is perfectly correct here, and as it is the original sentence I don't see why we should change it. Any expert insight on this one ?
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Status: Making every effort to create original content for you!!
Joined: 23 Dec 2010
Posts: 471
Location: United States
Concentration: Healthcare, Social Entrepreneurship
GMAT 1: 660 Q48 V34
GMAT 2: 750 Q49 V42
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its san  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Feb 2013, 09:02
Darmody wrote:
Quote:

Before here clearly indicates the sequence of events. Town was most popular and then storm destroyed the town.
Hence use of HAD BEEN is unwarranted in this situation. Simple Past Tense will should be used.


Is it a real thing ? I mean, from my understanding, it does not matter whether the sequence of events is already clear or not, as a grammatical rule you SHOULD use past perfect to refer to an event which happens before another one and both events are somehow related. I think had been is perfectly correct here, and as it is the original sentence I don't see why we should change it. Any expert insight on this one ?


Hi Darmody,

I too had the same doubt; everyone says that we should use past perfect verb when we want to express an event that happened before another event. I came across such sentence and was surprised.

However, it is a real thing. Past perfect tense is used to indicate such a past action, but if the meaning of the sentence clearly marks such a sequence then the use of past perfect would be considered as redundant (or in other words less preferred). Such a sentence would be grammatically correct, but if you have an answer choice without the past perfect then that would be the better one. I have not really seen an official question which tests this exception, however it could be tested, so, just make a note of this rule.

Hope that helps,

Vercules
_________________

Press Kudos if you want to say thanks

Ultimate Reading Comprehension Encyclopedia | Ultimate Sentence Correction Encyclopedia | GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios -- VERBAL | GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios -- IR

Please Read and Follow the 9 Rules of Posting in Verbal Forum

MBA Section Director
User avatar
V
Affiliations: GMAT Club
Joined: 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 6050
City: Pune
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its san  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Feb 2013, 10:21
jamifahad wrote:
Manhattan's rule for using Past Perfect:

1. Past Perfect is used to clarify or emphasize a sequence of past events. The earlier event should somehow have a bearing on the context of the later event.
2. The words "before" and "after" indicate the sequence of events clearly and emphatically enough to make the use of the Past Perfect unnecessary.


angel2009 wrote:
Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its sandy beaches and multiple opportunities for sports, had been one of the most popular resort destinations on the East Coast.

* had been
* has been
* had been being
* was being
* was


Before here clearly indicates the sequence of events. Town was most popular and then storm destroyed the town.
Hence use of HAD BEEN is unwarranted in this situation. Simple Past Tense will should be used.

OA E.


Apart from the above there are more other situations mentioned in MGMT guide in which use of past perfect is not required even when two actions have occurred in the past and one before the other.
1. If both the actions are performed by the same subject OR if the time sequence is already obvious then we do not require past perfect.
e.g. Antonio drove to the store and bought some icecream
2. Main clauses linked by AND or BUT do not require the past perfect. The reason is that in such case we are not emphasizing the order or time sequence here.
e.g. Antonio drove to the store and Cristina bought some icecream

Regards,

Abhijit
_________________

Starts from Feb 4th: MBA Video Series, Video answers to specific components and questions about the MBA application.

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 26 May 2013
Posts: 53
Re: Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its san  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 23 Jul 2013, 14:06
1
3
Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its sandy beaches and multiple opportunities for sports, had been one of the most popular resort destinations on the East Coast.

A-had been
B -has been
C -had been being
D -was being
E -was

<Amit> I marked it 'A' (although it sounds inappropriate) considering the event happened before a past event. The correct answer is 'WAS'. Please clarify my understanding on this.

Originally posted by Amit0507 on 23 Jul 2013, 10:25.
Last edited by Zarrolou on 23 Jul 2013, 14:06, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic.
Retired Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 15 Jun 2012
Posts: 1007
Location: United States
Premium Member
Re: Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its san  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Jul 2013, 10:53
2
1
Amit0507 wrote:
Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its sandy beaches and multiple opportunities for sports, had been one of the most popular resort destinations on the East Coast.

A-had been
B -has been
C -had been being
D -was being
E -was

<Amit> I marked it 'A' (although it sounds inappropriate) considering the event happened before a past event. The correct answer is 'WAS'. Please clarify my understanding on this.


Hi Amit.

As far as I know, verb tenses are "basic" but in fact difficult (if the questions only test you about verb tenses). The basic idea of past perfect is that one action completed before another action also completed in the past.

The past perfect form is: X (completed before Y) and Y also completed in the past.

Normally, if you want to emphasize Y ==> we use "past perfect" for X
However, if you want to emphasize X ==> the fact Y happened in the past does not matter ==> we use "simple past" for X.


In this question, the point we want to emphasize is "this town was the most popular resort destinations on the East Coast", not " the storm destroyed much of the harbor". ==> The fact about when storm happened does not matter. ==> "WAS" is more appropriate.

IMO, this question is NOT easy, the difference between "had been" and "was" is very subtle.

Hope it helps.
_________________

Please +1 KUDO if my post helps. Thank you.

"Designing cars consumes you; it has a hold on your spirit which is incredibly powerful. It's not something you can do part time, you have do it with all your heart and soul or you're going to get it wrong."

Chris Bangle - Former BMW Chief of Design.

Board of Directors
User avatar
P
Status: QA & VA Forum Moderator
Joined: 11 Jun 2011
Posts: 4391
Location: India
GPA: 3.5
WE: Business Development (Commercial Banking)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its san  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 May 2015, 08:14
angel2009 wrote:
Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its sandy beaches and multiple opportunities for sports, had been one of the most popular resort destinations on the East Coast.

* had been
* has been
* had been being
* was being
* was

What is the problem in A ? Because I think past perfect is necessary as by using simple past distorts the meaning


One of the most beautiful resort on the East Coast--------- > Storm---------> Destroyed Everything.

A clear picture can be drawn from the given statement - Sentence points out clearly the word before - Hence simple past tense is used , because we can clearly understand which actions / incident happened bofre something in the past.

Hence answer is (E)...
_________________

Thanks and Regards

Abhishek....

PLEASE FOLLOW THE RULES FOR POSTING IN QA AND VA FORUM AND USE SEARCH FUNCTION BEFORE POSTING NEW QUESTIONS

How to use Search Function in GMAT Club | Rules for Posting in QA forum | Writing Mathematical Formulas |Rules for Posting in VA forum | Request Expert's Reply ( VA Forum Only )

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 08 Jun 2015
Posts: 105
Re: Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its san  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Jul 2015, 15:32
charleshsu0952 wrote:
In my opinion, (A) is not wrong, but when we compared (A) with (E), (A) is more redundant than (E) because the use of "before" in the sentence has shown the order of different time. That's why (E) is better than (A).


I see (A) as being no more redundant than (E). Taken to the extreme, if "before" signals the past, then "was" shouldn't be grammatically allowed out of redundancy either. And, what about the continuous nature implied in "had been", where the town continuously ranked at the top, as opposed to, say, just one period before the storm, in which case "was" is appropriate?

I believe that the justification for (E) is that you cannot infer the town's continuous rank. It doesn't say anywhere else in the sentence the continuous nature of the town's rank, and the town's past status is in fact the portion we're correcting. Therefore, the most we can know is that it was at least once ranked as a top East Coast destination. If, however, the GMAT required readers to take the entire meaning of the original sentence as-is, then (A) must be correct (but the GMAT doesn't, since the original sentence may or may not be correct).
SVP
SVP
avatar
B
Joined: 06 Nov 2014
Posts: 1877
Re: Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its san  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Jul 2015, 08:18
Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its sandy beaches and multiple opportunities for sports, had been one of the most popular resort destinations on the East Coast.

A)had been Since we have the cue "before," the past perfect isn't necessary to indicate which action took place.
E)was
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 08 Jun 2015
Posts: 105
Re: Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its san  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Jul 2015, 10:04
OptimusPrepJanielle wrote:
Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its sandy beaches and multiple opportunities for sports, had been one of the most popular resort destinations on the East Coast.

A)had been Since we have the cue "before," the past perfect isn't necessary to indicate which action took place.
E)was



OptimusPrepJanielle: There's one explanation on this forum that seems to contradict what you say, which is why I'm confused.

Found in the following link: has-have-had-been-difference-185791.html

"Before the teacher entered the room, John had been cheating on the exam." (First, John was in the act of cheating on the exam. Later, the teacher walked in. Did John stop because the teacher walked in? Or had he already stopped for some other reason before she walked in? We don't know - but the OG prefers to interpret this as: John cheated. Then John stopped. Then the teacher walked into the room.)

According to the above, with the use of "before", (A) and (E) are equivalent. That still leads us to at least three different justifications, 2 for (E) and 1 for (A), depending on what takes priority:

1. Be concise, (E) correct: (A) is grammatically correct, and (E) takes priority only because it's less wordy and slightly less redundant (if at all).

2. Go with what we know, (E) correct: "Was" and "had been" are still different, because in the example above, John "was" cheating before the teacher walked in, may mean he was cheating at one time, say, 1 hour beforehand. Whereas, John "had been" cheating before the teacher walked in means John cheated on the exam for a while or for an unknown duration up until and because the teacher walked in. In which case, (E) changes the meaning of (A), and we accept (E) only because there is no way to know for sure how long something was going on before the storm, since the past duration and even cause is exactly what we're correcting in the sentence. Therefore, (E) is at least true, and (A) is possible but not known 100%.

3. Preserve Meaning, (A) correct: In contrast to (2), if we were to accept the original sentence's meaning, then (A) must be true, and (E) must be false, because there was an unknown duration of X before Y, and the storm directly causes X's duration to stop; it's not simply a one time occurrence of X sometime before the storm with a causal relationship not necessarily existing - only a temporal relationship is established by the word "before". For example, "Before the war, I was a singer, a dancer, and a mathematician." This only means sometime before the war, one was a singer, a dancer, and a mathematician, and not necessarily that the war caused one to cease being a singer, dancer, and mathematician. One could just be recalling a memory from long ago, and the war is just a major life event or reference point to recall a memory.


The real question is, whose question is this? OG? Manhattan? Magoosh? If it's from OG, then whatever the justification, go with their rule. If it's another's example, then it's still confusing. In that case, we'll need a different OG example in the same sort of setup (e.g. had been vs. was, "before" used, "had been"/"was" is underlined for correction) to clarify this matter.
SVP
SVP
avatar
B
Joined: 06 Nov 2014
Posts: 1877
Re: Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its san  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Jul 2015, 03:31
Use of the past perfect or simple past is optional when used with conjunctions. For GMAT optional is often synonymous with redundant. Here's a nice quick explanation in the "special cases" section: http://www.perfectyourenglish.com/gramm ... -tense.htm
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 08 Jun 2015
Posts: 105
Re: Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its san  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Jul 2015, 07:21
OptimusPrepJanielle wrote:
Use of the past perfect or simple past is optional when used with conjunctions. For GMAT optional is often synonymous with redundant. Here's a nice quick explanation in the "special cases" section: http://www.perfectyourenglish.com/gramm ... -tense.htm


Thanks for the link! I'm thinking that "was" is still preferred over "had been", for one past action before another, even in the special case when we want to emphasize the idea of completion. But, why would they call it a special case if it wasn't necessary? That "had been" is still grammatically correct, though "was" takes preference?
Board of Directors
User avatar
P
Status: QA & VA Forum Moderator
Joined: 11 Jun 2011
Posts: 4391
Location: India
GPA: 3.5
WE: Business Development (Commercial Banking)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its san  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Dec 2015, 01:03
icandy wrote:
ssandeepan wrote:
Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its sandy beaches and multiple opportunities for sports, had been one of the most popular resort destinations on the East Coast.


Image

Here we are presented with a sentence where clearly it is stated which event precceeds which one.

Thus we can say that before the storm the town was most popular.


When we are certain about the precedence / occurence of a certain event in the time elements ( In this case the starting - Before the storm .....) we do not need past perfect tense.

Past Perfect Tense must only be used to express the idea that a certain event precceeds another event in the timeline.

To me Befoe + had been for this particular sentence is redundent.


Hence I am with (E), simple past Was

Attachments

Untitled.png
Untitled.png [ 4.06 KiB | Viewed 731 times ]


_________________

Thanks and Regards

Abhishek....

PLEASE FOLLOW THE RULES FOR POSTING IN QA AND VA FORUM AND USE SEARCH FUNCTION BEFORE POSTING NEW QUESTIONS

How to use Search Function in GMAT Club | Rules for Posting in QA forum | Writing Mathematical Formulas |Rules for Posting in VA forum | Request Expert's Reply ( VA Forum Only )

Non-Human User
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 3641
Premium Member
Re: Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its san  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Jan 2019, 01:14
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
_________________

-
April 2018: New Forum dedicated to Verbal Strategies, Guides, and Resources

GMAT Club Bot
Re: Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its san   [#permalink] 26 Jan 2019, 01:14
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Before the storm destroyed much of the harbor, this town, with its san

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.