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Both the caribou and the reindeer belong to the species Rangifer taran

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Re: Both the caribou and the reindeer belong to the species Rangifer ta [#permalink]

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New post 27 Oct 2014, 11:52
SaharKhan wrote:
In my experience NO, I have done quite a many exercises and vertical split always worked for me. If the first first word does not agree with the sentence construction, How can it be correct? Vertical splits help u eliminate redundant dysfunctional sentences where u might feel the need to dispose time locating the mistake.

When You read the question and u get the gist of what the subject and the verb are, post which u can eliminate the obvious errors for eg. :
The clothes is in the washing machine (BAD)
The clothes are in the washing machine(thumbs up)
The cloth are in the washing machine(BAD)
The cloth is in the washing machine(thumbs up)

Though I always believe you should read the sentences quickly once even if you've found the errors. won't take u more than 15-20 secs to reconfirm what you're doing is correct.

Thanks, trying to explain it to the best of my ability :P

Cheers!

Sahar


Hello Sahar,

Thanks for your help, you are genius. I tried to give it a go according to what you told me. I could solve most questions in around a minute! That's crazy! I have heard people doing it before but I was not confident enough to apply on it previously. Thanks so much for your help. Just for my reference, what did you do in your GMAT Verbal?

Cheers! Gordon

PS: If anyone want to share more thought about this, please say so! :-D
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Re: Both the caribou and the reindeer belong to the species Rangifer ta [#permalink]

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New post 27 Oct 2014, 12:01
Glad to be of help.
Yet to give the exam.
*fingers crossed*

All the best for GMAT! :D

Best,
Sahar
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Re: Both the caribou and the reindeer belong to the species Rangifer ta [#permalink]

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New post 27 Oct 2014, 23:17
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Gordon, the way to avoid trouble with an initial split is to eliminate only those answers that you know are wrong. Don't say "Well, I like the sound of this better than that, so I'll make the cut." For instance, perhaps you like "developed a tendency" better than "developed the reindeer's tendency," but can you be sure that that's enough to make B-E wrong? Not at all.

Start with splits that have a clear right answer (subject-verb or pronoun agreement, for instance), and save "I like this better" or "That sounds awkward" for when you are out of any better criteria for making your choice.

I often compare this process to shopping for a car. There's no right answer there, of course, but there can be better and worse places to start. If I say, "Hmm, I've never had an orange car before. I'll try that," I will immediately reduce my options substantially. But is color really what's most important to me? I might cut out some of my best options! Start with what's most important (I want a car with a working engine!) and then get to the more trivial decisions.
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Re: Both the caribou and the reindeer belong to the species Rangifer ta [#permalink]

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New post 28 Oct 2014, 12:53
DmitryFarber wrote:
Gordon, the way to avoid trouble with an initial split is to eliminate only those answers that you know are wrong. Don't say "Well, I like the sound of this better than that, so I'll make the cut." For instance, perhaps you like "developed a tendency" better than "developed the reindeer's tendency," but can you be sure that that's enough to make B-E wrong? Not at all.

Start with splits that have a clear right answer (subject-verb or pronoun agreement, for instance), and save "I like this better" or "That sounds awkward" for when you are out of any better criteria for making your choice.

I often compare this process to shopping for a car. There's no right answer there, of course, but there can be better and worse places to start. If I say, "Hmm, I've never had an orange car before. I'll try that," I will immediately reduce my options substantially. But is color really what's most important to me? I might cut out some of my best options! Start with what's most important (I want a car with a working engine!) and then get to the more trivial decisions.


Hello Dmitry, thanks for your help! I am looking for an expert post like this, and wow I get it! :-D Thanks for confirming the way to eliminate an answer. In my previous gmat, i only got a 29 in verbal because I used this method when I was in a hurry. I don't expect to score that low as most of my mocks were 720+. I am a bit worried using this method for my retake. Now I understand probably I was lack of practice and was too used to read the whole sentences again. After reading your comments, I am now confident on practising this method. Thanks again!

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Re: Both the caribou and the reindeer belong to the species Rangifer ta [#permalink]

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Re: Both the caribou and the reindeer belong to the species Rangifer taran [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2016, 07:36
Both the caribou and the reindeer belong to the species Rangifer tarandus, but after 7,000 years of domestication in Eurasia, reindeer have developed a tendency to circle in tight groups, while caribou tend to spread far and wide.


(A) belong to the species Rangifer tarandus, but after 7,000 years of domestication in Eurasia, reindeer have developed a tendency to circle in tight groups, while caribou tend


(C) belong to the species Rangifer tarandus, but being domesticated in Eurasia for about 7,000 years has developed reindeer's tendency to circle in tight groups, and that is different from caribou tending
- can't use the pointing word 'that' (or 'this' or 'those' or 'these') by itself. you can only use these words as adjectives (that reason, these people) or as pronouns in constructions like 'that of...'

also wrong meaning

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Re: Both the caribou and the reindeer belong to the species Rangifer taran [#permalink]

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New post 28 Aug 2016, 01:00
Quite strange. I always thought that "deer" is singular and "deers" is plural. So was surprised that A is correct. May be there is a typo and should be "deers"?
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Re: Both the caribou and the reindeer belong to the species Rangifer taran [#permalink]

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New post 28 Aug 2016, 01:12
Konstantin1983 wrote:
Quite strange. I always thought that "deer" is singular and "deers" is plural. So was surprised that A is correct. May be there is a typo and should be "deers"?


Correct, but this is what oxford says

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/defin ... h/reindeer

It could be in any way.
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Re: Both the caribou and the reindeer belong to the species Rangifer taran [#permalink]

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New post 07 Sep 2017, 06:23
In B and C, it seems that both animals have developed the reindeer's tendency. B fails to clearly distinguish caribou from reindeer behavior.

D states that '7000 years of domestication have developed reindeer's tendency'. A is more logical; the reindeer have devloped a tendency.


E states that 'being domesticated has developed the reindeer's tendency'. Again, it is more logical to state that the reindeer haver developed a tendency. The subject phrase 'being domesticated' is illogical.


D & E are a bit awkward in stating that caribou and reindeer are the same species (rather than that they belong to the same species). However I don't think this is grammatically incorrect.

The answer is A.
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Both the caribou and the reindeer belong to the species Rangifer taran [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2017, 10:00
Both the caribou and the reindeer belong to the species Rangifer tarandus, but after 7,000 years of domestication in Eurasia, reindeer have developed a tendency to circle in tight groups, while caribou tend to spread far and wide.

(A) belong to the species Rangifer tarandus, but after 7,000 years of domestication in Eurasia, reindeer have developed a tendency to circle in tight groups, while caribou tend - Correct

(B) belong to the same species, Rangifer tarandus, but about 7,000 years of domestication in Eurasia have developed reindeer's tendency to circle in tight groups, which is different from caribou that tend - usage of which ; faulty comparison between tendency and caribou

(C) belong to the species Rangifer tarandus, but being domesticated in Eurasia for about 7,000 years has developed reindeer's tendency to circle in tight groups, and that is different from caribou tending - demonstrative pronouns without noun. you can only use these words as adjectives (that reason, these people) or as pronouns in constructions like 'that of...' ; faulty parallelism between tendency and caribou

(D) are the same species, Rangifer tarandus, but about 7,000 years of domestication in Eurasia have developed reindeer's tendency to circle in tight groups, while the tendency is for caribou -same issue with ARE vs. 'belong to' ; idiomatic usage problem with 'the tendency is for...': proper usage is 'X has a tendency to VERB'

(E) are the same species, Rangifer tarandus, but being domesticated in Eurasia for about 7,000 years has developed the reindeer's tendency to circle in tight groups, which differs from caribou tending - ARE the same species isn't acceptable ; usage of which to refer to tight groups ; bad parallelism between tendency and caribou

Answer A
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Re: Both the caribou and the reindeer belong to the species Rangifer taran [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2017, 10:35
"Are the same species" changes the meaning and awkward. Eliminate D & E.
But being domesticated is incorrect in C. Eliminate. Also it means domestication has developed tendency, again wrong.
But about in B as well as have as a wrong S-V helps in eliminating the choice.
A is correct due to perfect position of Nouns to describe & compare the two animals and at the same time uses correct idiom.



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Re: Both the caribou and the reindeer belong to the species Rangifer taran   [#permalink] 08 Sep 2017, 10:35

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