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Calculus, a subject offered to high school students planning to attend

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Re: Calculus, a subject offered to high school students planning to attend  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Apr 2017, 18:22
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I would not rather subscribe to the OE. First, I do not think that A is that bad. It still makes a lot of sense to take China's as the referent for the pronoun 'its', both logically and structurally.

I would think that C contains an incomplete thought in that it is not making clear categorically whose interest is waning. It could be China's or it could be any other country's. The intended meaning is simply dangling as far as I see. C may be structurally ok but logically aberrant.


Probably, if choice A says, 'China's' in the place of 'its' or if they included the possessive, 'China's' before the second part in C, then the choices might have been airtight. If you get to the brass tacks, what is the great difference between the two anyway?

The take away is that in GMAT, the best topics should test and teach logic and structure together.
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Re: Calculus, a subject offered to high school students planning to attend  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jun 2017, 08:15
Calculus, a subject offered to high school students planning to attend college involving the study of change, is used in the science and engineering fields, because it focuses on limits, derivatives, integrals, and infinite series.

(A) to attend college involving the study of change, is used in the science and engineering fields, because it focuses on - college does not involve study of change, but calculus does
(B) to attend college involves the study of change, and is used in the fields of science and engineering, because it focuses on - correct
(C) to go to college involving the study of change, and is used in science and engineering fields, because it was focusing on - same as A
(D) to attend college that involves studying change, and is used in the science and engineering fields, because it focuses on - same as A
(E) to attend college involving the study of change, which is now used in the science and engineering fields, focuses on - same as A
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Re: Calculus, a subject offered to high school students planning to attend  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Apr 2018, 02:21
feruz77 wrote:
Calculus, a subject offered to high school students planning to attend college involving the study of change, is used in the science and engineering fields, because it focuses on limits, derivatives, integrals, and infinite series.


(A) to attend college involving the study of change, is used in the science and engineering fields, because it focuses on

(B) to attend college, involves the study of change, and is used in the fields of science and engineering, because it focuses on

(C) to go to college involving the study of change, and is used in science and engineering fields, because it was focusing on

(D) to attend college that involves studying change, and is used in the science and engineering fields, because it focuses on

(E) to attend college involving the study of change, which is now used in the science and engineering fields, focuses on

B is the best.
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Re: Calculus, a subject offered to high school students planning to attend  [#permalink]

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New post 25 May 2018, 00:00
egmat GMATNinja @DimitryFarber chetan2u daagh TommyWallach
The verb-ing modfier "involving " cannot modify the college? accodring to the sentence " calculus is offered to students who wish to attend the college where " study of change " ,a particular field of study, is available in it's curicullum. Where am I wrong in my line of thinking? According to me both answer choices viz., A and B are grammatically correct and carry their own intended meanings. As per Gmat we have to consider the given meaning as the intended one unless it doesnt make sense. Can't a college involve a study of change? is the word involve wrong to modify the noun college? Please help.
I easily got down to A and B. But sticking to the intended meaning I went for A.
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Re: Calculus, a subject offered to high school students planning to attend  [#permalink]

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New post 28 May 2018, 22:14
AdityaHongunti There are a few problems with that reasoning.

First, there is no reason to assume that A represents the intended meaning. We need to look at all five answer choices to get a feel for that. To be fair, a real GMAT question would probably not attach "involve/involving" to college in four of the choices if that weren't the intended meaning!

Second, it doesn't work to say that colleges "involve the study of change." This kind of study may occur in colleges (in fact it does--in calculus class! ;) ), but that's not at all suggested by the verb "involve/involving."

Third, the way "college" is used in the sentence, it's not even referring to a particular place. We say "Did you attend college?" to ask if someone took college classes at all, not to ask about one specific college. In that way, "attend college" is similar to "go to school" or even just "study." Because of that, we don't want to use "college" as a noun here at all, so "involving" could really be seen as modifying the verb "attend" here. (We might say "I went to college hoping to learn the secrets of the universe.") Naturally, that makes no sense, so we need to throw this out.
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Re: Calculus, a subject offered to high school students planning to attend  [#permalink]

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New post 28 May 2018, 23:32
DmitryFarber wrote:
AdityaHongunti There are a few problems with that reasoning.

First, there is no reason to assume that A represents the intended meaning. We need to look at all five answer choices to get a feel for that. To be fair, a real GMAT question would probably not attach "involve/involving" to college in four of the choices if that weren't the intended meaning!

Second, it doesn't work to say that colleges "involve the study of change." This kind of study may occur in colleges (in fact it does--in calculus class! ;) ), but that's not at all suggested by the verb "involve/involving."

Third, the way "college" is used in the sentence, it's not even referring to a particular place. We say "Did you attend college?" to ask if someone took college classes at all, not to ask about one specific college. In that way, "attend college" is similar to "go to school" or even just "study." Because of that, we don't want to use "college" as a noun here at all, so "involving" could really be seen as modifying the verb "attend" here. (We might say "I went to college hoping to learn the secrets of the universe.") Naturally, that makes no sense, so we need to throw this out.


DmitryFarber Greetings Sir.
Thank you for your input. I would like you to put some light on the context set by the sentence. I mean the non underlined part says
"high school students planning to".What I inferred was that the context is specifying a particular group of students who want to attend a college which involves such curriculum . WHere am I wrong in inferring this ? Please guide me. Thank you
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New post 28 May 2018, 23:43
I see what you mean, but that still goes against my second and third points. Colleges can't "involve" the study of change. They can teach it or encourage it, but it doesn't mean anything to say that they "involve" it, whereas we can logically say that a field of study, such as calculus, involves the study of change. Additionally, when we say "attend college," we're not talking about a particular place. We'd need to say "attend colleges" or "attend a college" if we wanted to use "college" to refer to specific schools where calculus is taught.

Also, if we read the sentence the way you're proposing, we are then saying that calculus is offered specifically to "students wishing to attend college(s) involving the study of change." That's a very strange modifier to tack on. The version in B is more natural. We offer calculus to those wishing to attend college, and calculus is the thing that involves change.
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Re: Calculus, a subject offered to high school students planning to attend &nbs [#permalink] 28 May 2018, 23:43

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