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Calling all Booth Executive MBA Applicants:(2016 Intake) Class of 2018

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GMAT Date: 03-12-2014
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Calling all Booth Executive MBA Applicants:(2016 Intake) Class of 2018 [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2015, 02:31
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Concentration: Statistics, Strategy
GMAT Date: 03-12-2014
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Calling all Booth Executive MBA Applicants:(2016 Intake) Class of 2018 [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2015, 02:32
Essay Topics

Essay 1. Why are you seeking an MBA from Chicago Booth and what unique knowledge and experiences do you hope to contribute to the program? (maximum 2 pages, 12 pt. Times New Roman)

Essay 2. OPTIONAL: If there is anything else you would like the Admissions Committee to know about you, please share that information here. (maximum 2 pages, 12 pt. Times New Roman)

Essay 3. REAPPLICANTS ONLY: Please give us an update on your professional, academic, and community activities since your previous application and highlight what you have done to strengthen your application. (maximum one page, single spaced, 12pt. Times New Roman)
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The Journey Continues to London [#permalink]

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New post 06 Aug 2015, 12:01
FROM Booth EMBA Blog: The Journey Continues to London
With Wimbledon and sunny skies a distant
memory, the new global cohort of Executive MBA students arrived in London amidst grey
skies and a gloomy weather forecast. Fortunately the atmosphere on campus was
quite the opposite…



Image


Over the last month we've welcomed first-year students, fresh from KickOff Week, to London for their international sections. These sections - named Becker, Fogel and Miller, after three Nobel Prize winning faculty - are made up of students from all over the
world. Having gotten to know many of them during the application process, it was
great to offer a warm and personal ‘welcome to London’. Supporting and
witnessing their journey from applicant to student is something our admissions
team can’t help but feel proud to be a part of. It’s been a genuine pleasure seeing
the students settle into the program, become acquainted with their classmates
and embrace the rigor of classes. The international session weeks are the
perfect way for staff to meet students from campuses other than their own and
hear more about their diverse backgrounds and ambitions. What a fantastic group
of executives we have on the program this year… even if we do say so ourselves!



Whilst there was plenty of academic work to do during the London international weeks (namely Microeconomics and Managerial
Decision Making), there was also time for some stimulating social activities. These
ranged from an exclusive flight on the London Eye to taking in the views of the
capital’s skyline, to dining with classmates at a stylish local restaurant on
the bank of the river Thames.



Image


I participated in a number of these events
and really enjoyed connecting with students. In many cases, this involved building
on some of the things I learned during their admissions interviews. A lot of
students gave me their feedback on the program and were all excited about their
Booth Executive MBA experience so far. There were countless positive comments
on the calibre and diversity of their classmates and the quality of teaching. A
handful of students even shared their views on how they might assist with the
recruitment of next year’s intake!



We’ve already started recruiting for the
2016 offering of the program. If you’re interested in finding out more about
the Executive MBA, why not meet us at an upcoming admissions event or contact us directly for an initial review of your candidacy.

On behalf of the
global admissions team, I wish the new Executive MBA class every success on the
program and look forward to welcoming the next talented cohort in June 2016!  -->-->

Angela Heywood

Associate Director of Recruitment and Admissions, Executive MBA Europe
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Work Hard, Play Hard. An Energetic Welcome in Hong Kong [#permalink]

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New post 10 Sep 2015, 11:01
FROM Booth EMBA Blog: Work Hard, Play Hard. An Energetic Welcome in Hong Kong
Image



After wrapping their first
international section week in London earlier this summer, our new global cohort of Executive MBA students landed in
Hong Kong for their second international section week in August. This week
marks the first time our new students took part in classes located on the Chicago
Booth campus at the University of Chicago Center in Hong Kong

-->-->

One of the best aspects of our
program is the community that you gain through the experience. Traveling to
Chicago, London and Hong Kong together as a group provides an excellent
opportunity to make lasting friendships and learn more about the region by
speaking with classmates who are from there. It’s also fun! Our Hong Kong team was very excited to welcome students from all over the world to our city. Here are a few snapshots of the group enjoying their time there.



A traditional welcome

Image


Students were welcomed to campus with
a traditional Chinese Lion Dance, or wushi.
The lion dance is performed at the Chinese New Year but is also used to
mark important celebrations or honor esteemed guests.  The colorful and energetic “lions,” dancing
to the beat of the drums, set an upbeat mood for the students’ first day on
campus. It also signified an appropriate beginning for an intense week of
class, networking with local alumni, and career development workshops.



Taste of tropical fare

Image




In keeping with cultural theme, students took a
break from class to try a selection of tropical fruits native to Southeast
Asia; pomelo, longan, carambola, mangosteen and star fruit. We hoped that the
natural sugar would help carry them through their Negotiations class!



Work hard, play hard

Image


Work hard and play hard is a mantra familiar to our
Executive MBA students. The group ended their fourth class day with a boat tour
of Victoria Harbour aboard the renowned Star Ferry. They were treated to the
famous “Symphony of Lights” show, known as the world's largest permanent light
and sound staging. The tour provided unforgettable views of the
city at night and the accompanying music and narration from the symphony was
the perfect way to capture the enthusiasm and energetic spirit of Hong
Kong.



Goodbye for now, with more journeys to come

Image


We closed the week with dinner at the
R66 Revolving Restaurant, where students could take in 360° views of the city. The week ended with
lots of hard work, fun, laughter and the knowledge that it’s just a temporary
goodbye – we’ll see them back in class again soon!



Oh behalf of the Marketing, Recruitment & Admissions team,



Stephanie Wong

Assistant Director, Recruitment and Admissions, Executive MBA Asia

-->-->
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Meet Us Where You Are [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2015, 14:00
FROM Booth EMBA Blog: Meet Us Where You Are
Image


As an Admissions Counselor, one of my key responsibilities
(not to mention my favorite job function) is interacting with you, our
prospective students. We talk by phone and often exchange emails. I can answer
questions and offer insights on the experience you will have as an Executive
MBA student. These conversations, however, can be expanded to take your
understanding of Chicago Booth one step further. We offer a series of global events where
you can meet admissions staff, alumni and students in person. I work most
directly with prospective students based in North America, and can shed light
on opportunities to meet us there.



Connect with us in Chicago

We host Information Sessions at
the Gleacher Center throughout the fall and winter. These sessions are
wonderful opportunities for interested candidates to learn more about the
program, interact with staff, and meet Executive MBA alumni and current
students. We use this time to share information around the Chicago Approach, the
global campuses where you will study, the Executive MBA Program timeline and
curriculum. We also invite students and alumni to share their views on the
experience and this is where the real value of attending comes through - you get
to hear about the impact of studying at Chicago Booth straight from those who
have lived it.

-->-->

Tune in from work 

If you're unable to make it to campus for one of our
information sessions, we also host Online Sessions. These are
generally held during the lunch hour so you can easily join us while at work.
Both the in-person and online events provide an opportunity to ask questions
specific to your interests.

-->-->

Dine in your city

We recognize that meeting in more intimate settings creates
opportunity for one on one conversation. For those living outside of Chicago,
attending a Student and Alumni Dinner is
a great way to get to know Chicago Booth. We invite a small group of prospects
to gather over dinner with some of our local students and alumni. These
smaller events are particularly enjoyable for me as an Admissions Counselor. I
am always amazed by the generosity of our students and alumni to meet with
prospective students and the candor they show when describing their experience
or answering questions.

-->-->

Boothie for a Day

Prospective students often ask me what else they can do to
prepare to apply. My response is always to encourage them to come for a class visit to campus.  Without
a doubt, this is the best way to truly get a sense of the Executive MBA
program experience. I still remember my first visit to a Chicago Booth classroom. I felt a little intimidated at the caliber of the students but also fully captivated by the dynamic back and forth flow of conversation and expertise of the professor. I knew almost instantly that I was going to be transformed during my time here.

-->-->

Even as an alumna of the Full-Time
Program and an employee of Chicago Booth, I always learn something new when I
attend these events. I hear amazing stories of career advancements, professor
interactions, course material applications, and alumni connections. These
events often inspire me and remind me of how proud I am to be associated with
such a remarkable institution. Now it is your turn…I am looking forward to
seeing you soon!-->-->



Melissa Patterson ‘98

Admissions Counselor

-->-->

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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The Chicago Approach Lives in Singapore [#permalink]

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New post 06 Nov 2015, 13:01
FROM Booth EMBA Blog: The Chicago Approach Lives in Singapore
Image



Our team recently had the opportunity to
attend the Executive MBA Council conference in
Singapore last month.  One of the
benefits to hosting the conference in Asia was the proximity to very senior
industry leaders from the region. I was pleased to hear their perspectives on the
business landscape during several panel discussions, but one in particular
stood out.

During a session entitled “Leaders on
Leadership Training,” we had the chance to hear from one of our Executive MBA –
Asia alumnae, Goh Swee Chen, ’03 (AXP-2). Swee Chen serves as Chairperson of Shell Companies
in Singapore and Vice President for Commercial Fuels and Lubricants – Asia
Pacific, where she directs fuels and lubricants businesses in more than 10 Asia
Pacific countries.

When addressing her experience
at Chicago Booth, Swee Chen began by mentioning that no single rulebook guides
decision making these days. “You wake up not knowing what will happen every
day,” she said. “External shocks – floods, policy changes, ect. - can happen at
any time.” She explained that the Chicago Booth MBA helped her develop the
ability to “think": to take pieces of information, connect the dots and draw
conclusions to make good decisions. These skills, she reflected, are the keys
to running successful businesses with integrity.

She continued by saying that it is no longer
enough to be a big charismatic personality to head a business; you need to
actually have hard skills, the ability to think holistically and use those
skills to run ethical and successful businesses.

This resonated with me very strongly because
it demonstrates the Chicago Approach in action and how Swee Chen uses it on a daily basis at the top levels of
management at one of the world’s largest energy and petrochemicals
companies.

At Chicago Booth, our approach to business
education focuses on providing students with different lenses with which to
look at problems. We provide a basis in fundamental disciplines like Economics,
Psychology, Sociology, and a set of frameworks that allow our alumni to attack
any problem that is presented. It’s not a set of pat answers to already asked
questions; it’s a way to approach any problem that is in front of you –
anticipated or not - in a rigorous, systematic and data-driven way. It was
great to hear Swee Chen personally share how the approach that she learned here
has helped her to be successful in her role.



Richard Johnson

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Chicago Booth 2016 Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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Chicago Booth EMBA has streamlined its questions this year, giving you one essay with ample space to make your case holistically. This change indicates that they are looking for people who can organize their thoughts, build a credible and compelling case for their candidacy, and maintain an extended yet focused discussion. The Booth EMBA adcom clearly puts value on verbal expression and expects senior level managers to have mastered this skill. Give yourself time to develop and refine your essay accordingly.

Essays:

1. Why are you seeking an MBA from Chicago Booth and what unique knowledge and experiences do you hope to contribute to the program? (maximum 2 pages, 12 pt. Times New Roman)

The question zeroes in on the elements directly relevant to the adcom, but allows you to elaborate within those parameters. Considering the pivotal role the one required essay plays in your application, the key challenge is making good decisions about the following four elements:

Within the overall space allowance, how much space should you allocate to each part of the question? It will vary person to person. For example, a person who has her own company will require some “backstory” for context setting before discussing future plans, so she would allocate more space to goals than someone who is rising up the ladder at McKinsey. Someone with atypical goals (such as my client who successfully applied to a different top EMBA program) will need to spend more time clarifying why he wants the Booth MBA than a more conventional applicant. Analyze your own case and block out the essay accordingly.

You have to discuss your professional goals in order to explain why you are “seeking an MBA from Chicago Booth,” but how to present them? Since EMBA programs are part-time, an ideal place to start is your current work: what do you want to achieve and how do you want to grow during the years in the program? (This has the added benefit of giving the adcom a view of what you’ll bring to the table based on this work.) From there, move on to your goals for the 5-year period following graduation – give the most detail here; make it really concrete. Then sketch your longer-term career vision/plans, necessarily less detailed. Finally, explain how each of these career/goals phases require skills, knowledge, and perhaps relationships derived through the Booth EMBA.

How should you structure this relatively long, complex essay? Simply and straightforwardly is usually best. Start with your current/immediate goals. (If you need to provide some backstory for context, as noted above, do so as succinctly as possible.) Then progress through your goals. Next, discuss why you need the Booth EMBA now, connecting your reasons to the previously stated goals. Finally, present your contributions.

What “unique knowledge and experiences” should you talk about? Select two to four, and for at least two, give concrete examples. For all, discuss relevant insights – after all, that’s what you’re really bringing, not the fact of having done something. To select the best, consider what aspects of your experience would be interesting and/or useful to the Booth EMBA cohort and give them fresh insight or perspective. It could be related to industry, function, geographic/global experience, a formative personal experience, a particularly meaningful extracurricular (community or other non-work) involvement, etc. Choose points that expand the reader’s understanding of you, things they won’t necessarily glean from your resume, AND that have relevance to them.


2. OPTIONAL: If there is anything else you would like the Admissions Committee to know about you, please share that information here. (maximum 2 pages, 12 pt. Times New Roman)

This question invites you to present new material that will enhance your application, as well as to explain anything that needs explaining (e.g., gap in employment, choice of recommender if not using a direct supervisor, etc.). As far as enhancement points, there should be a clear value to the information you’re sharing – and it should not be content that more appropriately belongs in the main essay (contributions of unique knowledge and experiences).

3. REAPPLICANTS ONLY: Please give us an update on your professional, academic, and community activities since your previous application and highlight what you have done to strengthen your application. (maximum one page, single spaced, 12pt. Times New Roman)

Whatever developments you discuss, for each, describe the situation/experience concretely and clarify the impact you had. Also clarify how it demonstrates growth (i.e. not just “another” achievement), and why it makes you a stronger candidate.

Image


Image


By Cindy Tokumitsu, co-author of The EMBA Edge, and author of the free special report, Ace the EMBA. Cindy has helped MBA applicants get accepted to top EMBA programs around the world. She is delighted to help you too!

Related Resources:

Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One
Chicago Booth 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
7 Signs An Experience Belongs In Your Application Essay

This article originally appeared on blog.accepted.com.
Applying to a top b-school? The talented folks at Accepted have helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to their dream programs. Whether you are figuring out where apply, writing your application essays, or prepping for your interviews, we are just a call (or click) away.

Contact us, and get matched up with the consultant who will help you get accepted!
_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Top Six Questions About Applying [#permalink]

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New post 16 Nov 2015, 16:01
FROM Booth EMBA Blog: Top Six Questions About Applying
Image


At this time of the year I get asked a lot
of questions. Occasionally it’s a fun question, like, ‘where did you get those
great shoes’, but most of the time it’s an admissions related question. As the
1st December deadline looms large, I thought it would be useful to
list some common questions (and answers) here.
If your question isn’t covered below, feel free to reach out to our
admissions teams directly.

 

1. Do I really need to aim for the first deadline? There are two more to follow.  

We do indeed have several deadlines.
However, we also operate what is known as a ‘rolling admissions’ system. This
means that we make decisions on applications as soon as they are complete –
early applications receive an early decision. The closer we get to the final
deadline, the fewer spaces remain available. We build a class carefully to
ensure that we have good representation from all sectors, industries and countries.
Therefore it makes sense to apply as early as you can.



2. I
need more time to prepare for the GMAT! I’m going to miss the deadline! I’m
panicking!


Don’t panic. If you need to take the GMAT
(ie, you do not qualify for a GMAT waiver) then please do take the time to prepare and study. However, I
encourage you to get started on an application in the meantime. You can submit the other parts
of your application and keep in touch with us whilst you prepare for the test.
We won’t be able to make a decision on your application until we receive your
score, but at least you’ll be in ‘the pool’ and we’ll know who you are and what
you are planning to do. We can also calm you down at regular intervals, if that
would be helpful.



3. I
haven’t written an essay for 20 years and I don’t know where to start…


You will have to submit an essay as part of
your application to the Executive MBA Program. The essay question is quite simple, yet everyone has a tendency to ‘overthink’ it. Basically
we just want an insight into your motivations. Why an MBA and why Chicago
Booth? Why now? How will the program help you meet your goals? You’ll have an
opportunity to expand on all of these points at the interview, so please be
brief in the essay (two pages only). We want to hear your ‘voice’ on the page – we aren’t judging
your creative writing skills. Perhaps you can ask a friend or family member to
read it before you submit. I think the
best essays are always the most personal, so try to tell us a story.



4. My
recommenders are slowing me down – I’m missing one recommendation letter. What
can I do?


We don’t need your actual recommendations
at the point of application -  we just
need you to provide the contact details of your recommenders. We will send them
a form to complete online. If you have a separate letter that’s fine; you can
email it to us directly. If your recommender would prefer not to fill out the
form online, then he/she can also contact us directly. They will be sent
instructions about this. A lack of ‘actual’ recommendations need not slow you
down!



5. What
is a company support letter? Is this the same as a recommendation?


A company support letter is a letter from
your company (usually the HR department) acknowledging your enrolment on the
Executive MBA program. The company support letter is not a compulsory part of the application, but we
will need it if you accept our offer to the program. Some candidates prefer to
wait until they have received a decision before requesting this letter from
their company.



6. I’m
not a 37 year old investment banker. Am I too young/old/unusual for your
program?


It’s true that our students are, on
average, 37 years old and many of them work in financial services. However, if
you take a look at our class profile you’ll see that this is not representative of our whole program. We don’t have
a ‘typical’ student – you’ll find engineers, medical doctors, lawyers,
entrepreneurs and consultants in the classroom. The average age is 37, but it’s
obviously representative of a range. Don’t rule yourself out before you’ve even
begun – contact us to arrange a call. We can give you some immediate feedback on your
suitability for the program.



I hope this ‘Q&A’ is useful. Remember,
we’re here to help so please feel free to get in touch if you have any questions about the school or program. We look
forward to hearing from you, and reading your application!



Rachel Waites
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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Calling all Booth Executive MBA Applicants:(2016 Intake) Class of 2018 [#permalink]

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New post 22 Nov 2015, 21:10
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How My Business Became a Class Project [#permalink]

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New post 30 Nov 2015, 14:01
FROM Booth EMBA Blog: How My Business Became a Class Project
Image

Concepción
Prado is Principal and Founder of the Greenfield Group and an executive MBA student at Chicago Booth. She is also a member of the
Chicago Innovation Exchange. Below she writes about
her experience rebranding her company with the help of the Chicago Booth
community.



At the beginning of my second year at Chicago Booth, I decided to expand my business.



The decision came as a surprise to me. When I applied to Chicago Booth,
my focus was on furthering my education and formalizing my skill set. My
company, then known as Prado Consulting, is a management consultancy
specializing in IT services. We had been in business for 18 years and operated
as a small firm primarily servicing the Chicagoland area. I’ve always wanted to
do an MBA Program but up until this point I have been very focused on my family
(I have two children) and my business. When my youngest daughter started full
school days it finally seemed like the right time to go back to school. I also felt
that I had reached a juncture in my career; I needed to take a new step, but
wasn’t sure what that would be.



The idea to expand really took hold during the Marketing Management course I took with Professors Sanjay Dhar and Pradeep Chintagunta in the spring
term of my first year. Throughout the course, I had been thinking about my
business and how I could evolve it. I sent an email to both of my professors
and asked them the same question: Should
I build and expand with my existing company brand or should I undertake creating
a new identity? They each responded to me, and in true Chicago Booth
fashion, pushed me to think critically about my goals.  What did I want to do? How did I want to
position myself? Did I see the company reaching new customers on a national and
international level?



With their help, I determined that I needed to rebrand the identity of my
18 year old company entirely. Although this was the more difficult choice, it
was necessary to deliver my company’s message in a way that would resonate
globally.



As I worked through the process of creating a new identity for my firm, I
continually sought out the opinions of my faculty and classmates.  This was an invaluable asset. My classmates,
particularly those I had gotten to know in my Chicago-based study group and my
international study group, responded generously with their time and feedback. They
provided feedback on my ideas during class breaks, in study groups and over
email. They were an ideal group to have at my disposal – I was able to seek out
the expertise of 90+ seasoned professionals from all manner of industries and
functions.



Image

-->-->

When I had a question about intellectual property, I sought out a
classmate who works in the field. He pulled out his computer right away to show
me how to research. When it came time to choose my new company logo, I put it
to a vote within my cohort and had classmates from around the world weigh in on
which design worked best. In fact, my new company name, Greenfield Group, originated
from the collective creative genius that is my XP-85 cohort. A classmate with
marketing experience suggested three possible names. One of the choices was a
translation of my surname Prado, which means meadow or field in Spanish, to the
“Greenfield” of Greenfield Group. The name resonated.



Working with my fellow Boothies on this has given me a new strategy for approaching
future marketing initiatives for my company. Asking for help, finding
resources, learning best practices and forging stronger relationships in my
network have been the most significant takeaways for me.  I don’t believe an external marketing firm could
have helped me to rebrand as thoroughly as my connections within Chicago Booth
have – it truly became a class project. I am very proud of my firm’s new name and
image, and look forward to the future.



Concepción Prado '16 (XP-85)



Photos courtesy of Zeeshan Shaikh 

-->-->
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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Your Chicago Booth Interview: What to Expect and How to Prepare [#permalink]

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FROM Booth EMBA Blog: Your Chicago Booth Interview: What to Expect and How to Prepare
 Image



If you’ve been invited to interview for the Executive MBA Program you
are probably feeling excited and relieved, but also a bit nervous. You
likely have questions - What can I expect from the interview? And, how should I
prepare?

The interview is an important part of our admissions process.
It’s also an opportunity for you to get to know the school better and develop a
more thorough sense of our community. Your interview will typically be held
with an alumnus or a member of the admissions team. While you will have a
chance to expand on your essays, experiences, and reasons for attending Chicago
Booth, this is your time to ask questions and make a genuine connection. Keep
in mind that the experience is meant to be a positive one – there won’t be any
quizzes or interrogations. However there are some things you can do to ensure
that your experience is a good one. Here are some of our tips for a great
interview: -->-->

Before
the Interview: Research
-->-->

Similar to preparing
for a job interview, you'll want to research Chicago Booth and be able to
articulate why it’s a good fit for you. There is a lot of information about the program
available on our website, but
you can also call upon others in the Booth community. If you know any current students, alumni, faculty or staff, these are all good people to connect with beforehand. If you don't know anyone to talk with, contact the Admissions Office to see if they can put you in touch with someone.

Spend some time thinking about the questions your interviewer may pose. There
are three main points to consider: -->-->

1) Know yourself. What is
your story? How would you describe you skillsets, leadership traits, and unique
experiences?-->-->

2) Career trajectory. What
you have you accomplished in your career to date? Be prepared to showcase this
with concrete examples. -->-->

3) Your goals. What are your
aspirations? The Executive MBA Program demands a significant commitment of your
time and energy. How are you planning to use this investment in yourself? -->-->

Proper preparation includes practice. Say your answers out
loud a few times to friends, colleagues or family members. Ask them for honest
and constructive feedback.  -->-->

The rest of the preparations are easy. Make sure to write down your
questions in advance. Wear appropriate business wear and don’t forget to bring
a copy of your resume and essays. -->-->

During the Interview: The Basics

-->-->

1)    
Be on time. You may have heard that first impressions matter; well it’s true – they
do. Head out for your interview early, taking precautions to arrive ten minutes
prior. If you cannot make it on time due to unforeseen circumstances, be sure
to call the interviewer to let them know.

2)    
Relax. Once there, relax and be yourself. Authenticity is important.

3)    
Listen. Pay attention to the question that’s asked and then pause to think
before responding. If the question is
not clear to you, ask the interviewer to clarify. Then, prepare your response –
you are allowed to take time to think, and your interviewer will appreciate
your thoughtfulness.



Show curiosity. You will be given time to ask questions. Bring
along a couple of prepared questions and be ready to ask some that arise
from the interview session. The interviewer will be happy to answer your
questions and share their experiences so that you can get a clearer picture of
Chicago Booth. 



We wish you the best of luck as you move forward in your MBA journey. We
look forward to meeting you along the way!



Nick Soriano

Director of Recruitment and Admissions, Asia
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The Women's Network at Chicago Booth [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2016, 19:01
FROM Booth EMBA Blog: The Women's Network at Chicago Booth
Image


In a previous blogpost we talked about a great lunch we hosted with female Executive MBA
students in London. It was really interesting to discover how useful they found it to speak with
someone during the application process, particularly women of a similar
industry, country or background. We know that having a female mentor within the
Booth community has given many of our current and former students confidence to take the next step. -->-->

During the Executive
MBA program, female students are encouraged to actively engage with a variety of networks including the Chicago Booth Women’s Network. The group was founded in 2002 by alumni volunteers and offers a global community for Booth women to connect and support each other's career paths. In addition to participating in admissions
events, members co-host "Women's Week" networking receptions (held in
over 30 cities worldwide each year) designed to allow interested female prospective students to learn more
about Chicago Booth.

This year, the London admissions team will host a Women
in Business Networking Event with guest speaker MerrynSomerset Webb. Merryn is Editor-in-Chief of Money Week, an FT columnist and respected commentator on economics,
financial markets and personal finance. We invite female executives to join us on
Chicago Booth’s London campus on Tuesday, February 9 for what will be a fun and informative evening including
a presentation, Q&A and networking reception. At the session, Merryn will outline her argument that the situation with gender and
income inequality is improving, but wealth inequality is not. Drawing on
everything from textile manufacturing in medieval Italy to the aging of western
societies today, Merryn will explain why wealth inequality persists - and why
it matters. If you’re interested in
joining us, please reserve your seat today.

We're very proud that women currently make up 25% of our global student body and 30% of the London-based
Executive MBA cohort. If you’d like to find out more about any of our diversity
initiatives or are interested in hearing more about Chicago Booth’s Executive MBA Program, please contact a member of the admissions team.

We hope to see you at one of our upcoming events soon!

Angela Heywood

Associate Director of Recruitment and Admissions, Executive MBA -
Europe
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My Journey to the Global New Venture Challenge [#permalink]

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New post 25 Feb 2016, 08:01
FROM Booth EMBA Blog: My Journey to the Global New Venture Challenge
Christian
Heim is Vice President of Information Technology at GCM Grosvenor in Chicago
and an executive MBA student at Chicago Booth. Below he writes about his
experience competing in the Global New Venture Challenge [GNVC], an immersive, experiential learning program that helps Chicago Booth students
turn their ideas into viable companies.

Over
the course of GNVC, students form teams to create a business plan and
receive coaching from Chicago Booth faculty and industry experts. There are
several “rounds” in the competition where teams present their business plans
during live pitch sessions in front of investors, alumni and business leaders.
The competition culminates with a final round featuring the winning teams from
our Chicago, London and Hong Kong campuses on March 17.



Image

Christian Heim (pictured first on the right) watches as his team member presents during the GNVC semi-finals round.



My journey to the Global New Venture Challenge started during
summer elective courses. Similar to my decision to take on new challenges and
enroll at Booth, I decided to go all in on entrepreneurial electives. I took Building
the New Venture, Entrepreneurial Finance and Private Equity I and II, and
Commercializing Innovation. After that, I wanted more.

GNVC was the next logical step. I approached it with some caution –
I knew I still had a lot to learn about starting a business. As part of my
closing essay for Building the New Venture, I focused on how humbling the class
had been to me. It was humbling because I assumed I knew so much about being an
entrepreneur but soon realized that I knew very little.

Banding
together


Our GNVC team was formed in early October. Our company, Big Crowd, is a
platform designed to help event organizers manage large crowds by providing
real-time crowd analysis. We also had an idea for attendees; an app that
provides vital, even life-saving information to help avoid choke points,
navigate to services and friends, and provide social context to others.

Although I knew this was going to be a demanding experience, I was
excited to get started. If I ever wanted to start my own company, I needed to
go through the bumps and bruises of working with a team to create something
from the ground up.

Once we began, I had calls about GNVC every day. There were
discussions about the feasibility study, the business post-GNVC, and personnel. On a personal level, my work-life balance
became pretty strained. I had to carry my laptop around and be prepared for
calls at any time; I took them in attics, basements and even in my car. It was
a really crazy time.

November 1st was the application deadline day. I was tired
from late night tweaks and also from Halloween the night before (I have two
small children). Submitting the application kind of felt like the day of a
final exam – you have inundated yourself with the content and just want to be
done. However, we were very happy with our final proposal.

Acceptance!

In mid-November we found out we had been accepted into the competition. This
was huge for us, and we were extremely excited. We started planning how to get
ahead of the competition by putting in a lot of work during the months of
November and December. Unfortunately, this plan meant that our holiday season
was going to be packed with Booth stuff. My family wasn’t always happy with this
strategy, but I had to make it work.

We started to focus on our elevator pitch leading up to the semi-finals,
held in early January. We all had strong opinions on how to best approach this.
It was an interesting dance among highly opinionated, outspoken people (keep in
mind that we are executives in our day jobs, and tend to have the final say at
work!). In the end, we learned a key lesson about understanding when to lead by
following versus when to lead by taking charge.

As the semi-finals approached, we went from casual check-ins to a
reoccurring meeting three days a week. This was in addition to calls with
individuals, vendors and other parties. It was a strange time. As our team
evolved, so did our business. We went through various pivots and had to adjust
our value proposition again and again. There were heated discussions about
which way we had to go. Overall, we were a mixed bag of thoughts, but still had
pressing deadlines to keep.

Semi-finals Round 1: Bumps in the road

We continued to work on the business plan and presentation up until the
first day of class. While we pulled back on the meetings, the workload was
still every day. By this time, most of the team felt good about the material,
while others were not 100% on board with the recent changes. This was important
because it did divide our team a bit.

It was decided that one of our team members would give the presentation
on behalf of the group. We knew the judges weren’t going to like it and sure
enough, they noted it in our feedback. That being said, our presenter did a great
job on the pitch, and we received high scores in that area. At the same time,
the judges questioned our product. We didn’t have anything demo-ready, and we
were “all talk” at this point. This was hard to hear because we had put so much
effort into our business, yet we were coming off as too enthusiastic and selling “vaporware” - meaning that no actual product had been developed.

We knew we had to change up some major pieces for the next round. We decided
to switch the presenters and modified some of our content.

It’s worth noting again that the feedback was tough to take.
However, that’s part of the experience. While difficult, the hard comments and
intense scrutiny are integral to the value of the GNVC. We were pushed to
improve and do better. We needed to be broken and rebuilt.

After another two weeks of hard work, tweaking, and presentation
practice, we felt prepared for Round 2. It was going on 7 PM the night before
when we met with our GNVC Professor Waverly Deutsch for a trial run. Bad news: she absolutely shredded our unit model cost
breakdown. This meant we had to go into full overall, with the presentation
looming the very next morning. This was a mess, and the entire group was unhappy.
Not only did we have to go back to basic modeling and redo the financials, but we
had to modify the presentation and practice it. We ordered a Lou Malnati’s
deep-dish pizza and hunkered down to work. As bad as this last minute
derailment was, it demanded that we all come together as a cohesive group. We
did not sleep much that night, but we got through it.

Semi-finals Round 2: The big day

The big day arrived, and we did a lot of last minute practicing. The
presentation went really well, though we went over our time by 20 seconds. The
judges also dinged us on a miscommunicated calculation during the Q&A.

At the end of the day our journey ended here, in the semi-final round.
When I think of how much time I put into this company and course, it’s
incalculable. At one point, I even think I was dreaming about this stuff. It
just consumed me at certain parts of the day, and I couldn’t get it off my
mind.

So what
happens now?


Honestly, it is hard to say. BigCrowd still has a strong value
proposition and nothing has changed with the business. However, our team is
laser focused on finishing up with the XP-85 program in March.



On a personal level, I need some time to rebalance and recalibrate. The
lessons I learned from GNVC have been invaluable. BigCrowd aside, I have an
open thread with a Booth colleague about starting our own business and I feel confident
that at some time in the near future, we’ll get that venture going.



Christian Heim, ’16 (XP-85)
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Aiming for the "Wow-Factor": A GNVC Journey [#permalink]

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New post 02 Mar 2016, 11:01
FROM Booth EMBA Blog: Aiming for the "Wow-Factor": A GNVC Journey
Sheela Agarwal, MD, is Head of US Medical Affairs for Radiology at
Bayer HealthCare in New York City and an executive MBA student at the London
Chicago Booth campus. She has been competing in this year’s Global New VentureChallenge [GNVC] with her
team, 3DMed. GNVC is the executive branch of Chicago Booth’s New Venture
Challenge, a top-ranked business launch program designed to help students turn
their ideas into viable businesses. There are several "rounds" in the competition where teams present their business plans during live pitch sessions in front of investors, alumni and business leaders. The competition culminates with a final round featuring the winning teams from our Chicago, London, and Hong Kong campuses on March 17. We spoke
to Sheela just after she learned her team would be advancing in the
competition.



Image
Sheela Agarwal (pictured above, center) looks on as her team prepares to compete in the GNVC semi-finals in London.



How would you
describe your company?


SA: If there’s one thing I can do after this experience, it’s
to give our pitch!-->-->

Our company, 3DMed, uses 3D printing to create customized
surgical instruments based on patient anatomy and surgeon preferences. We believe
that this technology will allow surgeons to perform less invasive surgeries while
also saving hospitals money. -->-->

Is there a humanitarian
element to your work? Have you adapted the technology to use in disaster zones,
for example? -->-->


SA:  We did originally
have that intention. But our GNVC professor, Waverly Deutsch, advised us to take it out. She could see that by trying to do both things we
were actually attempting to address two distinct problems.  It wasn’t investable. So we decided to focus
and scale down our mission. Having a viable idea is one of the biggest lessons I've learned so far.

Where are you currently
at in the process?


SA: I just got off the phone with the Head of Cardiothoracic
Surgery at the University of Chicago Medical Center. We spoke for over an hour.
He is helping me think through how this technology can affect all surgeons.
We’re discovering more questions to consider, such as – how will surgeons know
that they need this tool? How can we create a need for this in the marketplace?
-->-->

So I’m working to get more information to truly assess our
model. I’ve consulted extensively with thoracic surgeons who I trained with
during my residency, and they are all familiar with the concept and on board
with our business idea. Now it’s time to get some unbiased opinions from
surgeons and medical professionals outside of my immediate network. -->-->

The networking has been one of the most valuable aspects of GNVC
so far. The coaches all know people who can be helpful and have generously introduced
us to them. It was actually  one of the GNVC coaches, Professor Robert Rosenberg, who introduced me to the surgeon I just spoke to. Another Chicago Booth alumnus based in London knew one of the top Medical 3D printing gurus in the UK and reached out to connect us. Professor Deutsch has encouraged this type of expert feedback
all along – she says that you don’t realize how valuable it is until after the
fact. I am really finding that to be true. -->-->

What was competing in
the semi-finals like? -->-->


Nerve-wracking! I dropped the pointer right in the beginning
of the presentation. But from there it went smoothly. It was really inspiring
just to be in the room and feed off of everyone’s energy. After weeks of
practicing, I felt like our team gave the very best presentation we had ever
done that day. It was quite a rush.



Image
Sheela holds a 3D printed instrument and a traditional one for judges to see.





What is the toughest
feedback you’ve received?


SA: During the competition, the coaches kept saying that our
numbers weren’t “wowing” them. They weren’t able to clearly see the potential
in the size of the business and, from their perspective, the market for our
instruments seemed tiny. They were not impressed. -->-->

I thought that if I could just prove the benefits they would
see our side of things, but in these situations investors don’t really listen -
they cut you off and remind you that you are not pitching to surgeons. It was a
good reminder. As a doctor, I was focused on the immediate impact this could
bring to my work. But I’ve been pushed to think about a much bigger focus. -->-->

After this feedback we went and reevaluated our slide deck
and our projections with the GNVC TA, Jamie Carmichael.  With his help, we realized that our
presentation of the financials just wasn’t clear, and the judges might have
interpreted our ‘unit model’—the sales we expected to make from one hospital—as
our initial projections. So we’ve been working hard at revamping our slides to
actually represent what we think the market for our product is...and we hope to "wow" the judges during the finals!-->-->

As told to Meghan Keedy by Sheela Agarwal, ’16 (EXP-21)-->-->

Read more about our students’ experiences in the Global NewVenture Challenge>>-->-->

--> -->
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Aiming for the Wow Factor: A GNVC Journey [#permalink]

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New post 12 Mar 2016, 08:00
FROM Booth EMBA Blog: Aiming for the Wow Factor: A GNVC Journey
Sheela Agarwal, MD, is Head of US Medical Affairs for Radiology at
Bayer HealthCare in New York City and an executive MBA student at the London
Chicago Booth campus. She has been competing in this year’s Global New VentureChallenge [GNVC] with her
team, 3DMed. GNVC is the executive branch of Chicago Booth’s New Venture
Challenge, a top-ranked business launch program designed to help students turn
their ideas into viable businesses. There are several "rounds" in the competition where teams present their business plans during live pitch sessions in front of investors, alumni and business leaders. The competition culminates with a final round featuring the winning teams from our Chicago, London, and Hong Kong campuses on March 17. We spoke
to Sheela just after she learned her team would be advancing in the
competition.



Image
Sheela Agarwal (pictured above, center) looks on as her team prepares to compete in the GNVC semi-finals in London.



How would you
describe your company?


SA: If there’s one thing I can do after this experience, it’s
to give our pitch!-->-->

Our company, 3DMed, uses 3D printing to create customized
surgical instruments based on patient anatomy and surgeon preferences. We believe
that this technology will allow surgeons to perform less invasive surgeries while
also saving hospitals money. -->-->

Is there a humanitarian
element to your work? Have you adapted the technology to use in disaster zones,
for example? -->-->


SA:  We did originally
have that intention. But our GNVC professor, Waverly Deutsch, advised us to take it out. She could see that by trying to do both things we
were actually attempting to address two distinct problems.  It wasn’t investable. So we decided to focus
and scale down our mission. Having a viable idea is one of the biggest lessons I've learned so far.

Where are you currently
at in the process?


SA: I just got off the phone with the Head of Cardiothoracic
Surgery at the University of Chicago Medical Center. We spoke for over an hour.
He is helping me think through how this technology can affect all surgeons.
We’re discovering more questions to consider, such as – how will surgeons know
that they need this tool? How can we create a need for this in the marketplace?
-->-->

So I’m working to get more information to truly assess our
model. I’ve consulted extensively with thoracic surgeons who I trained with
during my residency, and they are all familiar with the concept and on board
with our business idea. Now it’s time to get some unbiased opinions from
surgeons and medical professionals outside of my immediate network. -->-->

The networking has been one of the most valuable aspects of GNVC
so far. The coaches all know people who can be helpful and have generously introduced
us to them. It was actually  one of the GNVC coaches, Professor Robert Rosenberg, who introduced me to the surgeon I just spoke to. Another Chicago Booth alumnus based in London knew one of the top Medical 3D printing gurus in the UK and reached out to connect us. Professor Deutsch has encouraged this type of expert feedback
all along – she says that you don’t realize how valuable it is until after the
fact. I am really finding that to be true. -->-->

What was competing in
the semi-finals like? -->-->


Nerve-wracking! I dropped the pointer right in the beginning
of the presentation. But from there it went smoothly. It was really inspiring
just to be in the room and feed off of everyone’s energy. After weeks of
practicing, I felt like our team gave the very best presentation we had ever
done that day. It was quite a rush.



Image
Sheela holds a 3D printed instrument and a traditional one for judges to see.





What is the toughest
feedback you’ve received?


SA: During the competition, the coaches kept saying that our
numbers weren’t “wowing” them. They weren’t able to clearly see the potential
in the size of the business and, from their perspective, the market for our
instruments seemed tiny. They were not impressed. -->-->

I thought that if I could just prove the benefits they would
see our side of things, but in these situations investors don’t really listen -
they cut you off and remind you that you are not pitching to surgeons. It was a
good reminder. As a doctor, I was focused on the immediate impact this could
bring to my work. But I’ve been pushed to think about a much bigger focus. -->-->

After this feedback we went and reevaluated our slide deck
and our projections with the GNVC TA, Jamie Carmichael.  With his help, we realized that our
presentation of the financials just wasn’t clear, and the judges might have
interpreted our ‘unit model’—the sales we expected to make from one hospital—as
our initial projections. So we’ve been working hard at revamping our slides to
actually represent what we think the market for our product is...and we hope to "wow" the judges during the finals!-->-->

As told to Meghan Keedy by Sheela Agarwal, ’16 (EXP-21)-->-->

Read more about our students’ experiences in the Global NewVenture Challenge>>-->-->

--> -->
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Soaring Ahead: From Classroom to Boardroom [#permalink]

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New post 17 Mar 2016, 12:01
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FROM Booth EMBA Blog: Soaring Ahead: From Classroom to Boardroom
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CM Hwang, '08 (AXP-7) at the 2012 opening of the Bell Helicopter Service Center in Singapore, an idea that began at Chicago Booth.



When Chih Ming Hwang entered the Executive MBA Program in Asia
in 2006, he sought validation of his business knowledge and credentials. He was
happy with his career in sales, and hoped to move up in his company. He never
imagined that, in a few short years, he would transition from working for a
major corporation to running his own successful company - but that’s exactly
what happened.

-->-->

Chih Ming (better known as "CM") was on an accelerated career path even before enrolling.  After serving as staff writer and
photographer for the Republic of Singapore Air Force, he pivoted to the private
sector and spent the next 23 years working in aviation. He held a variety of
roles and was employed by Bell Helicopter as Business Development Director for
Asia Pacific when he began his journey at Chicago Booth.-->-->

A shift in gears was set into motion during CM’s second
year in the program. He participated in the first iteration of the Global NewVenture Challenge [GNVC], the
executive branch of Chicago Booth’s well known New Venture Challenge. This early
offering of GNVC allowed executive MBA students a platform to develop a
business plan and receive feedback from industry experts. -->-->

CM saw this as a perfect opportunity to bring value back to
his company. During his time at Bell Helicopter, he had observed a gap in the
services they provided. The company was focused on their helicopter and parts
business in the Asia Pacific region based out of Singapore but CM could see
there was the possibility to do much more. -->-->

One of the most valuable aspects of doing an Executive MBA
Program is the amount of human talent available to you through your classmates. CM approached two
study group members whose financial prowess he admired; they joined him and set
to work writing a business case that called for a new Bell Helicopter Service
Center to be built in Singapore, offering enhanced services to clientele. -->-->

As they prepared the case, CM relied on skillsets he learned
at Chicago Booth. He scoured his networks and connections to build common,
vested interest in the project as he’d been taught to do by Professor Ron Burt, a social
network expert. He referenced his Corporate Finance class to systematically
structure the financials. He leaned heavily on what’d he’d learned in Strategy
to think through the market needs. Lastly, he relied on a number of alumni
connections facilitated through Booth’s Career Services. -->-->

After honing their case in GNVC, the team used Bell
Helicopter’s annual regional meeting to pitch the idea directly to company
leadership. CM remembers a stark silence in the room after they finished. He
wasn’t sure if the idea had taken root or not. No one spoke until the CEO
weighed in: “How soon can you get this implemented?” -->-->

Though it took several
years to complete, CM oversaw the opening of the Bell Helicopter Service Center
in Singapore in July 2012. It is a $30 million, 165,000 square foot facility
with hangars for Bell and Cessna and now employs 100 people.  -->-->

The experience changed the way
CM viewed himself. “It caused me to imagine that I could do something
different,” he remarked. He had taken a risk by stepping out of his sales role
to take on something new. The venture’s success gave him a new level of
confidence.-->-->

Today, CM is leading a new
company in the aviation industry – Aero Infinity. He decided to leave Bell
Helicopter when his mentors suggested they would support him if he was ready to
step out and “do his own thing.” Those early investors are now his current business
partners. The company facilitates financing and leasing for aircraft and
services private clients, corporations, airline carriers, and emergency medical
personnel. Aero Infinity finalized their shareholders agreement in December
2015 and celebrated a soft launch during the Singapore Air Show, an event that
exceeded their expectations. -->-->

CM maintains an
entrepreneurial mindset. He is driven to continue identifying needs unmet and
thinking through how he might add value. At this point in his career, he finds
himself pondering how he can contribute to society at large versus meet company
KPIs. It’s a fulfilling position to be in. -->-->

His best advice to would be
entrepreneurs is simple: “Always double check information and validate the
data” – a fittingly “Boothie” approach.

 Meghan Keedy, Associate Director of Marketing Communications



-->-->
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Re: Calling all Booth Executive MBA Applicants:(2016 Intake) Class of 2018 [#permalink]

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New post 30 Mar 2016, 20:08
I'm a current student in the executive MBA program based in Hong Kong. Please let me know if any has any questions!
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WE: Business Development (Consulting)
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Re: Calling all Booth Executive MBA Applicants:(2016 Intake) Class of 2018 [#permalink]

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New post 30 Mar 2016, 20:09
I'm a current student in the executive MBA program based in Hong Kong. Please let me know if any has any questions!
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Posts: 184
Asking Your Employer for Support [#permalink]

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New post 18 Apr 2016, 09:01
FROM Booth EMBA Blog: Asking Your Employer for Support
Image

 

With an
Executive MBA, you’ll be able to work and study at the same time. Great! No
need to give up your role, salary or responsibilities. Sounds good, but
obviously this means you’ll also need the cooperation of your employer. Employer support needs to include time off to attend class, and some
students are able to secure financial sponsorship, too.

So, how
should you go about securing employer support for the Executive MBA? One good
way of approaching this is to create a business case, forming a persuasive
argument for company support. You should use your case to demonstrate the ROI
from a company perspective, focusing on their needs rather than your own.

Before you
compile your business case, do some background research. You’ll need to
consider:

• Why
specifically have you chosen Chicago Booth? Why is this school and program a
better choice for you than any others on the market?

• How does
the program fit with your career development plan at the company?  How
will it help get you to where the company needs you to be in 3-5 years?

• Why is the
Executive MBA better than an internal learning and development opportunity, if
appropriate?

• Will this
program meet a specific need at the company? Can a business case or
challenge be addressed by the content of this course? Some of our students areable to do this quite successfully.

• What is the
required time commitment? How will you manage the time away from the office?
This should include your responsibilities and also a plan for how you will
allocate the time away (vacation days, personal days, etc.).

• How much
will it cost? Remember to include travel and accommodation costs as well astuition. How will you plan to cover the costs with or without company support?

• What are
you prepared to commit to the company in return for support? Examples of this include lock in periods, bonus or salary sacrifices, and tuition fee refunds if you leave the company.

• What
exactly are you asking the company to contribute? Be specific about the amount
of funding and time off.

Addressing
these questions will help you figure out the appropriate level of support to
request. They will also help you create a robust and convincing business case.

Good luck!
We’re here to help, so please let us know if you need a hand.



Rachel Waites

Director of Recruitment and Admissions, Executive MBA -Europe
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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience

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Social New Venture Challenge: The Best Recipe [#permalink]

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New post 24 May 2016, 07:01
FROM Booth EMBA Blog: Social New Venture Challenge: The Best Recipe
Frederic Mahieu is a Mathematics teacher at the Lycee Francais de Chicago and an executive MBA student at Chicago Booth. Below he writes about his experience competing in the Social New Venture Challenge [SNVC].  SNVC is a business launch competition organized by the Social Enterprise Initiative and the Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation at Chicago Booth. Qualifying companies and organizations must show a focus on social impact as well as a model for financial sustainability.

Similar to the NVC, students form teams to create a business plan and receive coaching from Chicago Booth faculty and industry experts. There are several “rounds” in the competition where teams present their business plans during live pitch sessions in front of investors.



Image

SNVC participant Frederic Mahieu, pictured at  Lycee Francais de Chicago, where he is a teacher. Photo courtesy of the Lycee Francais de Chicago.



Imagine you want to cook a great
meal. You have all the ingredients in place, but aren’t sure how to proceed. You
know you have the potential to cook the best
meal ever, but it could also go terribly wrong. That’s why you need a
recipe that works.

As a student looking to start my
own non-profit business, I am the chef, and the best recipe I have found is the
Social New Venture Challenge [SNVC] at Chicago Booth. -->-->

I have been teaching mathematics to
middle and high school students for 16 years. When I first arrived in Chicago
from France in 2008, I felt that something was possible in this city. The
energy, the culture, the constant desire for innovation that thrives here gave
me a lot of ideas. After years working on diverse projects to popularize mathematics, I
decided I wanted to open a Cultural Institute dedicated to Mathematics. -->-->

You’re probably wondering what I
mean by a Cultural Institute for Mathematics. You might even be thinking it’s
a mistake – culture and math? Those two words don't usually go together. But yes, culture can be found in
math. I envisioned an Institute where visitors can learn about mathematics in history,
arts, music, architecture, finance, sports, technology and even the techniques
used in animated movies. The objective is to create an emotional experience
through the world of mathematics.

As my idea crystallized, I knew I had the vision, passion and community contacts to start the Institute.  But I’m a math teacher. I have none of the
skills required to create a company. That's how I found myself applying to
Chicago Booth last year. -->-->

Now that I’m here, I’m learning
from scratch everything related to the management of a company. The curriculum
is intense, but also fascinating. I’m learning all the ingredients needed to complete my “meal”:
strategy, marketing, management, accounting, finance. But I needed a recipe to fully bake my idea. That’s where the Social New Venture
Challenge comes in. -->-->

Why is the Social New Venture Challenge the best recipe to succeed? 

The first thing we worked on in the SNVC was creating a compelling pitch. As a participant, you’re asked to pitch
in front of other students, coaches and investors. While this can be
intimidating, you really benefit from the feedback. I used it to improve my approach and content. I learned that if you want to
convince others to financially support your idea it’s not enough to be
passionate and committed. You also have to prove the feasibility, growth and sustainability
of your business, and weave that into your pitch.

Starting your own venture is a risky business. Luckily, I found wonderful support for mine at Chicago Booth. I feel like I've been admitted into a family.  Professor Rob Gertner and the teams at the Polsky
Center and the Social Enterprise Institute have been so kind with me, and
everyone involved in the program has wanted to help us. We’ve been
introduced to people whose backgrounds and experiences could help us, like
Michael Lach, Director of STEM Education and Strategic Initiatives at CMSE and
the Urban Education Institute and Barry Aprison, Senior
Lecturer at the University of Chicago and Outreach Director of the Institute
for Genomics & Systems Biology. These relationships are precious when launching a new
venture related to math and museums.



Through the SNVC, I’ve also been able to connect with the Chicago
entrepreneurial community. 1871 is a center in Chicago for high-tech startups. I've been accepted to work there, and have been so inspired by the atmosphere of innovation. It's a great place to collaborate; as an entrepreneur, you're going to need designers, lawyers and even architects - and they can all be found at 1871.



I've also become involved with the Chicago Innovation Exchange [CIE]. The CIE functions as a spot where young entrepreneurs can meet and work on their projects. They also offer conferences with successful entrepreneurs daily. This have been incredibly helpful - I always leave with so many ideas.



Finally, I think it’s important
to characterize how the SNVC guides you through this process. Never during the
program were we told what to do or say. The professors and coaches never tried
to change our projects. This is a crucial piece of Chicago Booth’s culture:
They don’t tell you what to do; they push you to be the best at what you’re
doing. Through the SNVC, my project didn’t change, it just became better.



Frederic Mahieu, '17 (XP-86)



Read more
stories about entrepreneurship at Chicago Booth >>

Aiming forthe Wow-Factor

My Journeyto the Global New Venture Challenge

LessonsLearned from the Chicago Booth New Venture Challenge
Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience

Social New Venture Challenge: The Best Recipe   [#permalink] 24 May 2016, 07:01

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