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Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2015 Intake) Class of 2017 !

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Re: Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2015 Intake) Class of 2017 !  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Mar 2015, 13:02
Hi guys.

My spring break is next week. I got a chance to interview at Kellogg. Is it worth it to fly all the way from the South. I have been told that school won't be session and since decisions are out next week, the visit will not have an effect. Any opinions from you?
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Re: Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2015 Intake) Class of 2017 !  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Mar 2015, 13:05
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jbotero08 wrote:
Hi guys.

My spring break is next week. I got a chance to interview at Kellogg. Is it worth it to fly all the way from the South. I have been told that school won't be session and since decisions are out next week, the visit will not have an effect. Any opinions from you?


Since school is out and it won't have an impact, I would say save your money. If you get in, use the money to go to DAK II.
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Re: Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2015 Intake) Class of 2017 !  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Mar 2015, 13:13
jbotero08 wrote:
It depends on the tone. If it is more of small note, saying "Hey I spoke to this guy and he is great for Kellogg. He fits with our culture, etc." However, your friend is not at Kellogg. This should come from a student or alumni and it shouldn't be more than 300 words. If not it can be taken as a recommendation letter.

EndGame wrote:
Mstr wrote:
Guys, I have a question, I appreciate your guidance!

I have a close friend following a PhD in Northwestern Economics, the neighbour of Kellogg. I know, we are nearly at the end but we still have 9 days :-D
I want to know whether it helps, in any way, for my decision (even just +1 pts) if I make my friend to send a support letter on my behalf. If so, what do you recommend about format?

Thanks very much in advance. :wink:



The two you sent should be enough. They do not encourage any additional letters of reccomendation and that is clearly stated on the website. I wouldn't mess around at the last min.


I'm kind of a curmudgeon on these things, but if I was an adcomm and someone (after already submitting their application) did this, I would find it pretty annoying. I could maybe see it if they were a student, but here I really don't see it making much sense.
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Re: Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2015 Intake) Class of 2017 !  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Mar 2015, 13:37
Thanks for the advice. I will lay low and hang out.


techitytech wrote:
jbotero08 wrote:
Hi guys.

My spring break is next week. I got a chance to interview at Kellogg. Is it worth it to fly all the way from the South. I have been told that school won't be session and since decisions are out next week, the visit will not have an effect. Any opinions from you?


Since school is out and it won't have an impact, I would say save your money. If you get in, use the money to go to DAK II.
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Re: Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2015 Intake) Class of 2017 !  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Mar 2015, 14:00
Man it's been so long since the interview sometimes I forget I'm waiting on Kellogg...can't wait to get this over with next week!
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Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2015 Intake) Class of 2017 !  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Mar 2015, 14:18
jbotero08 wrote:
Thanks for the advice. I will lay low and hang out.


techitytech wrote:
jbotero08 wrote:
Hi guys.

My spring break is next week. I got a chance to interview at Kellogg. Is it worth it to fly all the way from the South. I have been told that school won't be session and since decisions are out next week, the visit will not have an effect. Any opinions from you?


Since school is out and it won't have an impact, I would say save your money. If you get in, use the money to go to DAK II.


Quick question, was the offer either interview on campus or no interview at all?
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Re: Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2015 Intake) Class of 2017 !  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Mar 2015, 14:27
jbotero08 wrote:
Thanks for the advice. I will lay low and hang out.


techitytech wrote:
jbotero08 wrote:
Hi guys.

My spring break is next week. I got a chance to interview at Kellogg. Is it worth it to fly all the way from the South. I have been told that school won't be session and since decisions are out next week, the visit will not have an effect. Any opinions from you?


Since school is out and it won't have an impact, I would say save your money. If you get in, use the money to go to DAK II.


If it is the case where you can either choose on campus next week or none at all, then things change a little. On one hand, they said it should have no impact on the decision, so it shouldn't matter either way. On the other hand, it could be one of those cases where just showing that you are willing to interview even when it has no impact makes the difference, especially if you end up being waitlisted.

That is definitely a tougher call.
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Re: Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2015 Intake) Class of 2017 !  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Mar 2015, 05:28
Actually I was seesawing on this issue. I wasn't sure and so I asked your guidance. Thank you though.
This guy is my close friend and we also worked together. He even made me contact with one of current Kellogg students.

So, I thought it was not a rec letter but rather a support letter from a guy who knows me well and my interest in Kellogg. It would not be long.

Ok, thanks for all your insight.


[quote="Cartman4179"][quote="jbotero08"]It depends on the tone. If it is more of small note, saying "Hey I spoke to this guy and he is great for Kellogg. He fits with our culture, etc." However, your friend is not at Kellogg. This should come from a student or alumni and it shouldn't be more than 300 words. If not it can be taken as a recommendation letter.

[quote="EndGame"][quote="Mstr"]Guys, I have a question, I appreciate your guidance!

I have a close friend following a PhD in Northwestern Economics, the neighbour of Kellogg. I know, we are nearly at the end but we still have 9 days :-D
I want to know whether it helps, in any way, for my decision (even just +1 pts) if I make my friend to send a support letter on my behalf. If so, what do you recommend about format?

Thanks very much in advance. :wink:


The two you sent should be enough. They do not encourage any additional letters of reccomendation and that is clearly stated on the website. I wouldn't mess around at the last min.
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Bend the curve: Accelerate your startup’s success  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Mar 2015, 07:00
FROM Kellogg MBA Blog: Bend the curve: Accelerate your startup’s success
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In the world of innovation, there is no single path to success.

There can, however, be value in learning about the successes and failures of other innovators. That is why Kellogg lecturer Andrew Razeghi wrote “Bend the Curve: Accelerate Your Startup’s Success.” In the book, readers will learn from successful entrepreneurs — including a collection of Kellogg faculty members and alumni — as well as venture capitalists and mentors of Techstars, one of the world’s leading new venture accelerators. The goal? Learn how to grow your startup.

“Having worked with entrepreneurs for over three decades, it is always surprising that just one example, one idea or one referral can lead to a major breakthrough in the growth of a company,” said Linda Darragh, executive director of the Kellogg Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative, on the “Bend the Curve” website. “Instead of spending hours of precious time trying to identify, connect and meet mentors, this book can instantly bring hundreds of game-changing ideas to your fingertips from the best mentors in the ecosystem.

“This is worth reading several times as your company grows.”

Razeghi is the founder of StrategyLab, Inc., a growth strategy and innovation consulting group. He also serves as a limited partner in Techstars and an angel investor in many startups. At Kellogg he teaches “Launching New Products and Services.” He took a few minutes to give readers an inside look at some of the finer points of the book.

IN YOUR OPINION, WHAT ARE THE THREE BIGGEST THINGS PEOPLE SHOULD KEEP IN MIND AS THEY TRY AND GROW THEIR STARTUP?

  • THINK DISTRIBUTION FIRST.

    First-time founders often make the mistake of focusing on their new product at the expense of focusing on distribution. Before you invest too much time on the product, think through how you are going to get distribution. Who is going to help you get to market? Get in front of customers? Promote your product? etc. An idea without a customer is not innovation. It’s merely an idea.
  • SURROUND YOURSELF WITH EXPERIENCED ENTREPRENEURS.

    Yes, you need someone who can build it. You also need someone who can sell the idea. But mostly, you need someone (or better yet, several people) who have walked down the road you are about to walk down. Seek out mentors – entrepreneurs who have started and scaled businesses from the ground up. Their collective wisdom will save you both time and money.
  • BE PATIENT.

    Contrary to the hype, it takes a decade to become an overnight success. (Outliers exist, yes, but they are outliers for a reason).
WHAT DO YOU THINK IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING STUDENTS PURSUING THEIR MBA CAN TAKE AWAY FROM THE BOOK?

Starting a business is easy. Staying in business is hard. “Bend the Curve” is a book about how to survive (and thrive) after you’ve made the commitment to start.

WHY WOULD YOU RECOMMEND A PROSPECTIVE STUDENT PURSUE THEIR MBA AT KELLOGG?

For those interested in innovation, the worlds of corporate innovation and startups are colliding. What used to be a bright line between entrepreneurship and large company innovation is fading away. Many of the principles in “Bend the Curve” are directly applicable to success inside the Fortune 500. Kellogg’s legacy over many decades in the management of large enterprises combined with its renewed focus and energy on corporate innovation and entrepreneurship gives the school a unique position as these two worlds collide.

Filed under: Academics, Business Insight, Career Tagged: entrepreneurship, faculty, Innovation, mentors, Startup, success, venture capitalists Image
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Alumni Spotlight: David Hegarty ’07  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Mar 2015, 07:00
FROM Kellogg MBA Blog: Alumni Spotlight: David Hegarty ’07
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Get to know some of Kellogg’s alumni who are bringing bold entrepreneurial visions to life.

As is the case with many great ideas, David Hegarty’s Fixed app came during a moment of personal frustration.

The Dublin, Ireland, native lives in San Francisco, where he managed to accumulate four parking tickets over a few weeks last year.

“I decided to pay them one morning, and when I came back to my car, there were two more,” Hegarty, 36, says. “At that point I was livid. San Francisco is pretty ruthless with the ticketing.”

An entrepreneur-in-residence at Palo Alto-based venture capital firm Merus Capital, Hegarty was mulling over ideas for a new startup when he mentioned his ticket frustrations to a friend.

“He said, ‘Dude, why don’t you turn that into an iPhone app?’” Hegarty says. “I took that idea and I ran with it.”

And so began Fixed, an iOS-only app designed to take the heavy lifting out of contesting parking tickets in San Francisco. Anyone who gets a ticket in the city simply needs to take a photo of the citation and submit it through the downloaded Fixed app. The Fixed team, in turns, drafts a letter to contest the ticket and submits it to the city.

Fixed makes money by charging users 25 percent of the cost of the ticket if they overturn it successfully. If they fail to overturn it, there’s no financial obligation to Fixed — the user must simply pay the ticket to the city.

Hegarty started work on Fixed last November. The app’s Internet landing page went “viral” two months later, he says.

“Before we knew it, we had about 25,000 signups and NPR called us for an interview,” Hegarty says. “That was when the app went live, and it has been growing its user base ever since.”

Learn more about Fixed and how Kellogg helped David get where he is today.

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Study Abroad: Key to Competing in the International Economy  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Mar 2015, 09:37
How important are travel and education experiences abroad to achieving success in the global economy? That’s almost a trick question, since the answer is a resounding v-e-r-y. The ability to work well internationally with people and cultures other than your own has never been more critical than it is today, and one of the best stepping stones to cross-cultural competence is studying abroad.
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Wharton Magazine has published a fascinating article highlighting the recent White House Summit on Study Abroad and Global Citizenship. During that event, First Lady Michelle Obama said studying abroad is “quickly becoming the key to success in our global economy. Getting ahead in today’s workplace isn’t [just] about getting good grades … but about having real experience with the world beyond your borders. Study abroad is about shaping the future of your country and of the world we all share.”

Several travel bloggers and digital media influencers were invited to the event. One such guest, the publisher of WanderingEducators.com Jessie Voigts, says, “Study abroad and gaining international experience are critical to citizens of the world today. In order to compete in the international economy, we need to have an educated, well-traveled, resilient population.”

We’ve covered the subject of studying abroad in the past, and of particular interest were the research findings of Kellogg School of Management Professor Adam Galinsky, who suggested that living abroad boosts creativity.  Together with the study’s lead author William Maddux, an assistant professor of organizational behavior at INSEAD, they conducted five studies to test the idea that living abroad and creativity are linked.

The results showed that the longer students had spent living abroad, the more likely they were to come up with more creative solutions to problems. “Knowing that experiences abroad are critical for creative output makes study abroad programs and job assignments in other countries that much more important, especially for people and companies that put a premium on creativity and innovation to stay competitive,” Maddux wrote. 

Take a look at Lisa Ellen Niver‘s piece, “Make Study Abroad an Education Imperative,” for further thoughts on how international education experiences will help Americans keep pace with other countries in global marketplace.
You may also be interested in:
Living Abroad Boosts Creativity, Say INSEAD & Kellogg Profs

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Re: Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2015 Intake) Class of 2017 !  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2015, 04:34
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Good luck for next week everyone! I know these last few days can be very stressful as I lived them myself last December! Hang in there!
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Re: Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2015 Intake) Class of 2017 !  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2015, 04:43
I'm sorry I didn't explain myself well. I interviewed on campus earlier. However, I was sick with my first case of food poisoning. I remember nursing Powerade as my legs were cramping from lack of Potassium. However, I did it but I could have done better in my behavioral questions.

That would have been my second visit to campus.



techitytech wrote:
jbotero08 wrote:
Hi guys.

My spring break is next week. I got a chance to interview at Kellogg. Is it worth it to fly all the way from the South. I have been told that school won't be session and since decisions are out next week, the visit will not have an effect. Any opinions from you?


Since school is out and it won't have an impact, I would say save your money. If you get in, use the money to go to DAK II.
[/quote]

If it is the case where you can either choose on campus next week or none at all, then things change a little. On one hand, they said it should have no impact on the decision, so it shouldn't matter either way. On the other hand, it could be one of those cases where just showing that you are willing to interview even when it has no impact makes the difference, especially if you end up being waitlisted.

That is definitely a tougher call.[/quote]
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Lessons learned from internship recruiting  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2015, 07:00
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FROM Kellogg MBA Blog: Lessons learned from internship recruiting
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First-year student Rohan Rajiv is blogging once a week about important lessons he is learning at Kellogg. Read more of his posts here.

I hated looking for a job in my final year at university. It is one of those profoundly painful processes that I really wouldn’t wish on anyone. It seemed to bring to surface all my insecurities and really made me question if I had done anything of note in the past 20-odd years of my life.

So, when I decided to study again, one of my objectives was to understand how best to approach looking for a job. We’re in an age where we’re constant job seekers. Whether it is seeking an internal transfer within a company we work for or whether we’re looking for a role in a different company, it is clear that our age is one of many jobs, roles, careers and companies.

In that sense, looking for an internship at school felt like a perfect laboratory to test how this process ought to be approached. I’ve decided to break the whole process down into three main steps, catalogue my process and then share what I learned. I’ve attempted to bring it all together in one post. It is long. I hope it is worth it.

Stage 1- Figuring out what I want to do
This has to be the first step of any job or project search. There are always options you don’t want. And it helps to really understand what you want to do rather than follow the crowd. A simple point to remember: for every job or role you don’t feel all that passionate about, there are a hundred people who do.

MY PROCESS
1) SPEAK TO AS MANY SMART PEOPLE AS POSSIBLE.
I liken this stage to market research. Take time to just get some perspective from people you like and respect. Just engage with them about general advice on careers, paths and how you ought to approach them. It helps a GREAT deal if you already have a sense of the direction you’d like to take. For example, it is much easier to have conversations focused on careers in pharmaceuticals than just careers in general. Ideally, speak to people who’ve done what you’re about to do or something similar. These perspectives should give you data points and perspective to reflect on. After every such conversation, take a few minutes to take short notes of what you took away.

2) TAKE THE TIME TO REFLECT.
Now, take the time and think about what you think you’d be interested in and what you’d like to explore. Write down what you learn. The ideal outcome of this process is a short list of roles and companies that you’d be interested in working at.

3) EXPLORE WAYS YOU CAN MEET PEOPLE IN THESE TARGET ROLES OR COMPANIES. 
There are two ways to approach this. The intentional approach is very targeted and focused on getting a job. This involves looking into your LinkedIn connections and figuring out who you know in a certain industry. If you’re looking for connections in pharma near New York, it makes your search straight forward. Once you find a few people who know people you’d like to meet, you reach out and set up some informational meetings.

The other way to approach this is to do this with less intention (my preferred approach). Reach out to people you know within the industry you’d like to work with and just ask to meet with interesting people. As long as your interest is genuine, this can lead to some really cool serendipitous connections. Take the time to visit these people in person (if at all possible) and just meet. No big agenda aside from a willingness to get to know them and listen. In the long run, this approach makes a huge difference and is how good “networking” is done.

LESSONS I TOOK AWAY
1) GET STARTED AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE.
I was told to get started on this process well before I got to school. It is one of the better pieces of advice I have received. The principle here is straightforward – some things just take time. And it is best to do so when you don’t have a burning deadline in sight.

2) APPROACH THIS PART OF THE PROCESS WITH THE INTENTION TO LEARN AS MUCH AS YOU CAN.
Relationships are not built by seeking specific favors. Relationships are built when you have a genuine interest in getting to know the person at the other end of the table. At this stage, it is critical to really get to know people. The perspective you’ll receive from someone who has gone through the same process as you is one that you’ll be hard pressed to find in a book.

3) THINK LONG TERM.
This isn’t about getting what you think you want now. If it is, then you’re approaching it all wrong.

Stage 2 – Attempting to get your foot-in-the-door via an interview
MY PROCESS
1) FINALIZE THAT TARGET COMPANY AND ROLES LIST TO THE EXTENT POSSIBLE.
It helps having a pre-final list. Of course, it’ll change, but it helps having an idea of the direction you’re heading.

2) WORK HARD ON THAT RESUME. 
I think my resume went through at least 20 iterations. It is really important you get as many external points of view as possible, filter out the feedback that suits your style and trust a few people to help finalize on a document that you are happy with. It isn’t over until you are happy with it.

3) FIND WAYS TO SIGNAL STRONG INTEREST.
In school, this means showing up to company events and speaking to recruiters. Outside of schools, this means speaking to people within the company/within teams of your interest and making sure people within the company know of your interest.

4) WORK HARD ON THAT COVER LETTER.
There are a few companies out there who just expressly forbid cover letters. Aside from those, take the time to work on that cover letter. This is a wonderful way to signal interest and explain why you are a fit for the role you’re applying to. This is especially important if you are switching roles or careers. Make sure you run your company-specific cover letter with at least one person from each company you are applying to. The goal isn’t to use every piece of feedback you get. The goal is to filter it for what works for you, trusting a few people whose style suits yours and getting to a version that you are happy with.

5) SEND YOUR APPLICATIONS IN EARLY
Seriously. Don’t wait for the last minute.

LESSONS I TOOK AWAY
1) NARROW OR BROAD? FIND AN APPROACH THAT SUITS YOU.
There are many, many ways to go about this process. But, the biggest difference tends to be whether you prefer casting a broad net of target roles and companies or whether you prefer a much more targeted and narrow approach. I honestly don’t think there is a right or wrong answer here as I’ve seen both work exceptionally well. The important thing is to pick an approach that works for you. I’ve come to prefer a narrow approach that is very focused. But that’s just preference. It has its downsides as you put your eggs in fewer baskets. But the upside is that you only work on roles that really interest you.

2) DON’T DO THINGS TO CHECK THE BOX — DO IT BECAUSE YOU CARE.
This is a general life lesson but really applies here. Don’t reach out to recruiters to check the box. Do it because you have a question. This is not everyone’s approach. But I’d find it hugely frustrating if I found myself on a call that was motivated by a desire to check the “I spoke to someone within the company” box rather than out of genuine desire to learn.

3) SEEK AND GET COMFORTABLE WITH HARD FEEDBACK.
Better to have hard feedback early on your resume and cover letter than just receive rejections when you apply. Seek hard feedback and celebrate when you do receive it.

4) PERSONAL CONTACTS MATTER.
If you’ve taken the time to build relationships at the places you want to work, interview calls come much easier. They know you, they like you, they’d like to give you a shot and your resume submission is just a formality. Makes it easy for them and yourself. I know it is cliche, but who you know does actually matter a lot.

Stage 3 – Be the best you can be in those interviews
It is easy to imagine the process of attempting to get an interview as a game where you notch up points. Once you have received that interview call, however, your score gets reset to zero. Now, you walk into territory where your previous contacts and relationships matter a lot less (if at all) and where your competence gets a shot at shining through.

MY PROCESS
1) MASTER THE BASIC PIECES: BEHAVIORAL, THE FOUR WHY QUESTIONS, AND YOUR STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES.
There is a tried-and-tested approach to doing well at behavioral interviews. I’ve written about that and added my enhancements to the approach in an earlier post on the topic. The key here is to just put in the time, write down all your key stories, take time to understand your own thought process as you approach different kinds of problems and work on communicating it.

With the four why questions — Why industry? Why company? Why role? Why you? — it matters that it feels passionate and genuine. Boring, prepared answers fail this test almost immediately. If you’re not able to find enough passion to explain these in your practice, I’d really question if you’re interviewing for the right role.

Finally, with strengths and weakness questions (especially weaknesses), speak to people who know you well and practice your responses. This needs to feel genuine.

2) USE THE “TELL ME ABOUT YOURSELF” / “WALK ME THROUGH YOUR RESUME” QUESTION TO SET THE TONE.
This is an important question. Once you’ve taken the time to write down all your key stories and answered the “why’ questions, a clear pattern on your main themes should emerge. I am a big fan of thinking about the one thing you’d want the interviewer to remember about you. Then, think about three things. Structure your “Tell me about yourself” around these three things rather than a chronological order. This question is important because you can already lead in to the why company/role questions if done well. Really take the time to get this right. The final product needs to be succinct, and it definitely needs to reflect YOU. Practice and feedback goes a long way with this question.

3) WORK HARD ON TECHNICAL/CASE INTERVIEWS.
My interviews required me to get really good on case-style interviews very quickly. For the roles I was looking at, these were either technology product cases (easier) or broad strategy cases (harder). In some ways, I was a bit late into this realization for broad strategy cases and had to work really hard over a three-week period to catch up. I ended up looking back at three weeks where I read two books, worked out around 30 cases by myself, 20 with my wife, and 15 mock cases with friends and ex-colleagues. Work with people who’ve mastered the process and aim to find your own path.

Four books helped me greatly in the process:

  • Product cases: Cracking the PM interview (Gayle Laakmann, Jackie Bavaro) and Decode and Conquer (Lewis Lin)
  • Strategy cases: Case in Point (Marc Cosentino) and Case Interview Secrets (Victor Cheng)
All this reading and interviewing led to two synthesized approaches that I could apply across these two kinds of cases:

  • For product cases, I had a five-step process:
    • What is the problem the product exists to solve?
    • Who are the users/buyers?
    • How does it perform?
    • What changes would I recommend?
    • How would I prioritize these changes?
  • For strategy cases, I’ve synthesized my one-page approach here.
I’m staying away from any more specific advice on technical/case interviews as it is important you do all the reading required and develop a style that works for you.

4) CUSTOMIZE YOUR PREPARATION FOR EACH COMPANY.
Consider developing “snapshots” of your research of the company you’re interviewing for. Here’s an example of a page full of publicly available information on LinkedIn. This stuff takes time, but my belief is that this sort of preparation just comes through in the interview.

5) DEVELOP A PRE-INTERVIEW ROUTINE.
Confidence matters a lot in the interview game. Develop a routine that helps you feel good. I used to generally wake up early, scribble a few notes of my approach to case interviews, read through my snapshot and behavioral interview notes. Just before the interview, I’d listen to the same collection of songs. I’ve heard of others who did a few “power poses” before their interviews. This is very personal, so experiment with a few different routines and then settle on what works for you.

LESSSONS I TOOK AWAY
1) THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE FOR PRACTICE AND PREPARATION. 
Nothing more needs to be said here.

2) TRY AND DO THREE INTERVIEWS OVER TWO WEEKS WITH ONE PERSON WHOSE OPINION YOU TRUST.
While it is important to get as many mock interviews under your belt, I’d highly recommend doing two-to-three interviews over a two-week period with one person whose opinion you trust. This way, you’ll be able to monitor your progress better than just doing five mock interviews with five different people.

3) PACE YOUR PREPARATION.
It is hard to sustain intensity over a long period of time. So pace your interview preparation as far as possible. You will have peaks and troughs. If you pac e yourself well, your peaks will come on your most important interview days.

Bringing it all together
If I had to look back at the past few months and give myself advice for the next time I did this, I would tell myself three things.

First, it is a team effort. So take the time to build and nurture this team. Any successful process has a team of people who worked on it (e.g., your applications to school were successful because of recommenders, parents and mentors). Similarly, it helps to have a support system of folks who want you to succeed. Ask for help when you need it (and you will). And remember those who help; say thank you often, keep them informed of your progress (or lack of it for people who are very close to you), be nice and commit to helping them in any way possible and/or paying it forward.

Second, allow luck to find you. In all of these processes, there is always a certain amount of dumb luck involved. Just remember – chance favors the prepared mind. So be prepared.

Finally, aim to be the best version of yourself. We often attach ourselves to outcomes we don’t control. I’ve written about how admissions and hiring is largely a crap shoot after a certain point. Neither of these are easy processes. That said, they can be very educational. Just aim to learn and celebrate the fact that you’ve given it your best shot. In the long run, the habit of being prepared, showing up and giving it your best tend to matter more than most other things. And, besides, it is my belief that good processes lead to good results.

All the best. I hope it helps.

Rohan Rajiv is a first-year student in Kellogg’s Full-Time Two-Year Program. Prior to Kellogg he worked at a-connect serving clients on consulting projects across 14 countries in Europe, Asia, Australia and South America. He blogs a learning every day, including his MBA Learnings series, on www.ALearningaDay.com.

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Re: Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2015 Intake) Class of 2017 !  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2015, 07:07
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vtitiun wrote:
Good luck for next week everyone! I know these last few days can be very stressful as I lived them myself last December! Hang in there!



Cannot wait for next week and be done with this! Crazy how the day is so close.
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New post 20 Mar 2015, 14:22
can't believe Medill is emailing me so close to decision day!
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New post 21 Mar 2015, 09:05
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4 days left guys and girls!
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New post 21 Mar 2015, 12:25
what time did calls start going out in rd1?
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New post 21 Mar 2015, 12:51
Don't remind me. I'm concerned cause my video was weak (my fault) and I had food poisoning during my interview. (Not my fault.)

At least I got some green board so I'll be somewhere next year.
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Re: Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2015 Intake) Class of 2017 !  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Mar 2015, 03:57
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jessepinkman wrote:
what time did calls start going out in rd1?


FYI, http://gmatclub.com/forum/calling-all-kellogg-applicants-2015-intake-class-of-173722-1160.html#p1457620 was the first post from a GC member reporting a call.

GC Timestamp: 17 Dec 2014, 01:56
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Re: Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2015 Intake) Class of 2017 ! &nbs [#permalink] 23 Mar 2015, 03:57

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