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Stanford GSB: Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!

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Stanford GSB 2015-2016 Deadlines, Essay Questions  [#permalink]

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New post 13 May 2015, 12:09
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The Stanford Graduate School of Business has announced the application deadlines and essay questions for the MBA Class of 2018.
Round One Deadline
Application Due: September 22, 2015
Decision: December 9, 2015
Round Two Deadline
Application Due: January 12, 2016
Decision: March 30, 2016
Round Three Deadline
Application Due: April 5, 2016
Decision: May 11, 2016
Essay Questions
Essay A: What matters most to you, and why?
For this essay, we would like you to:
  • Focus on the “why” rather than the “what.”
  • Do some deep self-examination, so you can genuinely illustrate who you are and how you came to be the person you are.
  • Share the insights, experiences, and lessons that shaped your perspectives, rather than focusing merely on what you’ve done or accomplished.
  • Write from the heart, and illustrate how a person, situation, or event has influenced you.
Essay B: Why Stanford?
Enlighten us on how earning your MBA at Stanford will enable you to realize your ambitions.
  • Explain your decision to pursue graduate education in management.
  • Explain the distinctive opportunities you will pursue at Stanford.

Length
Your answers for both essay questions combined may not exceed 1,150 words. Stanford GSB suggests 750 words for Essay A, and 400 words for Essay B.

All materials, including letters of recommendation, are due by 5 p.m. Pacific Time on the day of the deadline. For more information, please visit the Stanford GSB MBA admissions website.

***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.
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Stanford GSB 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines  [#permalink]

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New post 15 May 2015, 00:56
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There is very little change between last year's and this year's Stanford GSB MBA essay questions.  One minor change to note: You get an entire 50 extra words for your two essays. Last year the total word count was 1100 words. This year the maximum length is 1150. This is noteworthy only because it represents one of the few  times in recent years that schools are allowing you to provide a little more information about yourselves than they allowed previously.  Stanford is bucking the trend here.

Stanford gives a lot of advice and guidance on its website as to what it’s looking for in the essays. You should access that advice.

Stanford moved its Round 1 deadline up about a week (from Oct 1 to this year's Sept. 22.). It moved its Round 2 deadline to January 12 from last year's Jan 7. Round 3's deadline for 2016 is April 5; last year's final deadline was April 1.  As I said in a recent podcast, the MBA application cycle -- like some sports' seasons and certain individuals' waistlines, is expanding.

My tips are in blue below.

Stanford GSB 2016 MBA Application Questions:
Essays help us learn about who you are rather than solely what you have done. Other parts of the application give insight to your academic and professional accomplishments; the essays reveal the person behind those achievements.

When writing your essays, resist the urge to “package” yourself into what you think Stanford wants to see. Doing so will only prevent us from understanding who you really are and what you hope to accomplish. The most impressive essays are the most authentic.

Essays:

We request that you write two personal essays. The personal essays give us glimpses of your character and hopes. In each essay, we want to hear your genuine voice. Think carefully about your values, passions, aims, and dreams prior to writing them.

Essay A. What matters most to you, and why?

For this essay, we would like you to:
• Focus on the “why” rather than the “what.”
• Do some deep self-examination, so you can genuinely illustrate who you are and how you came to be the person you are.
• Share the insights, experiences, and lessons that shaped your perspectives, rather than focusing merely on what you’ve done or accomplished.
• Write from the heart, and illustrate how a person, situation, or event has influenced you.

This superficially straightforward question has been Stanford’s first for the last several years, and it is actually one of the most difficult, if not the most difficult MBA essay questions to answer. It demands introspection. Before you put finger to keyboard or pen to paper, really reflect on what you value, how you have acted upon those principles, and why you value them. Stanford’s advice urges reflection. The question requires it.

When I reflect on our many successful Stanford clients, initiative in the face of need is the common thread among them. They are always the ones who revealed, especially in Essay A, that they do not turn away when they see a problem or need for action. They grab the initiative when faced with an opportunity to contribute. They are comfortable expressing emotion and their values, and their actions reflect both, but particularly the latter. Think purpose-driven, principle-driven lives.

More than anything else, initiative and self-awareness characterize the successful Stanford applicant. Implication: You have to know your values and those times you have acted upon them. Yes I wrote that a few seconds ago, but it bears repeating. Climbing Mt. Everest or suffering from terrible social ills is not a requirement of admission, but you do have to know the person occupying your skin.

Essay B. Why Stanford?
Enlighten us on how earning your MBA at Stanford will enable you to realize your ambitions.

A strong response to this essay question will:

• Explain your decision to pursue graduate education in management.
• Explain the distinctive opportunities you will pursue at Stanford.

Now that question is succinct, and really says what they want to know.

Similar to  questions that have occupied this Stanford application slot for years, this question is a variation of a standard MBA goals question, as revealed in the two bullet points after it. For this forward-looking question, you say why you want an MBA. The best way to do so is in terms of your desired post-MBA professional direction. Then explain how Stanford’s program specifically will help you travel down that path.

Understand the flexibility inherent in Stanford’s curriculum, its integrated approach to management, its entrepreneurial culture, and how both will help you learn what you need to know to achieve your career goals. Realize that the curriculum allows for personalization based on your goal and your past experience, specifically your previous business education. Two pieces of information are required to answer this question: A clear MBA goal and an in-depth understanding of Stanford GSB’s curriculum. (Folks: It’s not just the ranking, brand, or location.)

Essay Length:

Your answers for both essay questions combined may not exceed 1,150 words. Below are suggested word counts per essay, but you should allocate the maximum word count in the way that is most effective for you.

      •   Essay A: 750 words
      •   Essay B: 400 words

Formatting
• 12-pt. font size
• Double-spaced
• Recommended font types: Arial, Courier, or Times New Roman
• Indicate the question you are answering at the beginning of each essay (does not count toward the word limit)
• Number all pages
• Upload one document that includes both essays

Be sure to save a copy of your essays, and preview the uploaded document to ensure that the formatting is preserved.

Additional Information:

If there is any information that is critical for us to know and is not captured elsewhere, include it in the “Additional Information” section of the application. Pertinent examples include:
• Extenuating circumstances affecting academic or work performance
• Explanation of why you do not have a letter of reference from your current direct supervisor
• Work experience that did not fit into the space provided
• Academic experience (e.g., independent research) not noted elsewhere

This is optional. Respond if you have something to explain or need the additional space because you can’t fit in your work experience or all academic info. Responses should be succinct and to-the-point and should provide the context necessary for Stanford to understand the circumstances surrounding whatever difficulty you are writing about.

If you would like professional guidance with your Stanford GSB application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Stanford GSB application.

Stanford GSB 2016 MBA Application Deadlines:

Application Round 
Submit Your Application By 
Notification Date

Round 1
22 Sept 2015*
09 Dec 2015

Round 2
12 Jan 2016*
30 Mar 2016

Round 3
05 Apr 2016*
11 May 2016

* Applications and Letters of Reference are due by 5:00 PM, Pacific Time

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsWhat Stanford is Looking for: Personal Qualities and Contributions
• What Stanford is Looking for: Demonstrated Leadership PotentialValentine’s Day, Economics, and Stanford GSB

Accepted.com's experienced admissions consultants can help you create the most impressive application possible with comprehensive packages, or provide targeted assistance from picking perfect programs to designing a dazzling resume, constructing engaging essays, or preparing for intense interviews…and more! Accepted.com has guided thousands of applicants to acceptances at top programs since 1994 – we know what works and what doesn't, so contact us to get started now!

​​

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​ ​

This article originally appeared on blog.accepted.com, the official blog of Accepted.com.
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Re: Stanford GSB: Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 18 May 2015, 00:46
The Dhirubhai Ambani scholarship essay is " How do you aspire to shape India's Future". Can anyone who has previously written and succeeded, lend some bright ideas/directions? Its 250 words and that's highly constraining. Should I take about my Post MBA goals or Stanford's contribution in the whole scheme of things?(But those are already 2 separate essays!!)...Or is it my wishful thinking that I need to present (How realistic can I sound if I say I want to reduce corruption..All I can think of is take a gun and go on a killing spree of all the corrupt people....)

Please help !!
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Business School Gender Balance Improving  [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2015, 13:52
[caption id="attachment_3603" align="alignright" width="225"]Image
UC Berkeley Haas takes the lead with a 43% female student body.[/caption]

Women now make up 60% of university graduates, but most business schools have lagged behind when it comes to gender balance—impacting not just women’s experience of b-school, but the composition of the workforce afterward. A new report from gender consulting firm 20-first looks at the numbers of women MBA students and faculty at top programs, and finds that while there has been some improvement in the last few years, we still have a ways to go before achieving gender balance.

Lesley Symons, one of the authors of the report, points out that this “balance” is not merely an issue of numbers—currently, the curriculum at most b-schools is defined and driven by male faculty, male-dominated case studies, etc. She suggests that a deeper issue of cultural change is at stake, in order to make business education “gender bilingual” and effectively train the next generation of business leaders.

The report found that gender balance among students at top programs is improving (with several top US programs near or over 40% representation for women), while faculty numbers are slower to budge.

Here are some of the report’s findings regarding female MBA students and faculty:

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Related Resources:
Best MBA Programs and How to Choose the Right One
Leaning in While Pursuing Your MBA: The MBA Mama Story
Forte Helps Women In Business Thrive: Interview with Elissa Sangster

Accepted.com's experienced admissions consultants can help you create the most impressive application possible with comprehensive packages, or provide targeted assistance from picking perfect programs to designing a dazzling resume, constructing engaging essays, or preparing for intense interviews…and more! Accepted.com has guided thousands of applicants to acceptances at top programs since 1994 – we know what works and what doesn't, so contact us to get started now!

​​

Accepted.com



This article originally appeared on blog.accepted.com, the official blog of Accepted.com.
​​
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Business School Rankings by Industry - Top MBA Programs in Finance for  [#permalink]

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New post 21 May 2015, 22:17
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By Paul Lanzillotti, Amerasia Consulting Group
Today's blog post is going to be the first in a series that covers business school rankings. More specifically, it's Amerasia's attempt at ranking top MBA programs by industry and based on publicly available data. Our motivation for doing this is quite simple - business school rankings differ quite drastically from publication to publication. US News seems to be the most consistent and widely followed. After Businessweek ranked Fuqua at number one, they decided to change their methodology.  Whether the two are correlated is up for debate. John Byrne over at "Poets and Quants" covered the change quite extensively here.

Regardless, we've never felt completely comfortable with the rankings because (to our knowledge) the raw data that drives the rankings has never been fully disclosed. Yes, we do know that the methodology (ranking model) has been discussed on relevant websites, but it's a cursory explanation of the process in our opinion. Also our opinion - that the process is still very much a black box.  So we decided to start over and see what we could come up with.  Most importantly we started with the very numbers that the school's career centers are reporting via their respective employment reporting.

Our opinion is that recruiting (i.e. who's hiring) drives most programs "investment" decisions - in students, faculty, courses, experiential initiatives, alumni outreach, etc.  So to know to what a specific MBA program is really all about, you need to see the end result. In other words, what industries are hiring MBA graduates and from what schools?

Now before we get into the numbers, a few words of caution. What we have done is our first attempt at a numerically based ranking and its not perfect. It's based on our interpretation of the numbers put forth by top business schools. Let us explain. Most MBA career centers report employment numbers according to the categories that we use in our rankings. Some schools break "industry" categories into further sub-categories. Other programs - i.e. Michigan Ross - roll up their industry categories under more general headers like "manufacturing". So you could be a "marketing" professional but be within the manufacturing industry. To be forthright, it's a little confusing. (This is why we have decided to exclude Michigan Ross from some categories until we gather a little more insight into their self-reported numbers.)

None-the-less, we have tried to make sense of it all and to do this we did combine some categories in order to get an apples-to-apples comparison across schools. Clear as mud?  That being said, we welcome any constructive feedback you may have. Either post your comments below or email us at MBA@amerasiaconsulting.com.

Top MBA Programs in Finance (2015)
AKA THE RANKING OF BUSINESS SCHOOL PROGRAMS BY PERCENTAGE OF GRADUATES ENTERING THE FINANCE INDUSTRY IN 2014.
Our first ranking is "Finance" and Chicago Booth comes out on top.

[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="408"]Image
Top MBA Programs in Finance by Percentage of Graduates Entering the Industry (2015)[/caption]

 

Source Data:

We compiled this ranking based on information taken directly from the following MBA employment reports.
Haas

http://haas.berkeley.edu/groups/careercenter/reports/14-15ReportSummary.pdf

UCLA Anderson

http://www.anderson.ucla.edu/Documents/areas/adm/cmc/2014%20PARKER%20CMC%20Employment%20Report%2002.10.15%20LR.pdf

Stanford GSB
https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/documents/Stanford%20GSB%20Employment%20Report%202013-14.pdf

MIT Sloan

http://mitsloan.mit.edu/pdf/Class_of_2014-intern_employment_report.pdf

HBS

http://www.hbs.edu/recruiting/mba/data-and-statistics/recruitingreport/

http://www.hbs.edu/recruiting/mba/data-and-statistics/employment-statistics.html

Wharton

http://www.wharton.upenn.edu/mba/your-career/career-statistics.cfm

Kellogg

http://www.kellogg.northwestern.edu/career_employer/employment_statistics.aspx

Chicago Booth

http://www.chicagobooth.edu/employmentreport/

Columbia

https://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/recruiters/employmentreport

NYU Stern
http://www.stern.nyu.edu/programs-admissions/full-time-mba/career/employment-statistics

Tuck

http://www.tuck.dartmouth.edu/careers/employment-statistics

Yale SOM

http://som.yale.edu/yale-som-connect/recruiting/employment-statistics

Michigan Ross

http://michiganross.umich.edu/our-community/recruiters

Duke Fuqua

http://www.fuqua.duke.edu/mba_recruiting/recruiting_duke/employment_statistics/

Cornell Johnson

http://www.johnson.cornell.edu/Career-Management/Employment-Report-for-Two-Year-MBAs

UVA Darden

http://www.darden.virginia.edu/recruiters-companies/hire-an-mba/employment-reports/
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Top MBA Programs in Technology (Updated 2015)  [#permalink]

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New post 25 May 2015, 05:08
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By Paul Lanzillotti, Amerasia Consulting Group
OUR RANKING OF BUSINESS SCHOOL PROGRAMS BY PERCENTAGE OF GRADUATES ENTERING THE TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY IN 2014.
Today's blog post is a follow up to our Top MBA Programs in Finance ranking. It's also our continued attempt at ranking top MBA programs by industry and based on publicly available data.

UC Berkeley Haas comes out on top when it comes to sending graduates (as a percentage of all graduates in 2014) back into the technology industry. UCLA Anderson is second, but it's not even close. Hands down, Haas is the place to be if you're into technology and want to work for a related firm in the industry.
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BUYER BEWARE
Now before you get too far into interpreting the numbers, a few words of caution. What we have done is an inaugural attempt at a numerically based ranking and its not perfect. It's based on our interpretation of the numbers put forth by top business schools.
  • Let us explain. Most MBA career centers report employment numbers according to the categories that we use in our rankings. Some schools break "industry" categories into further sub-categories. Other programs - i.e. Michigan Ross - roll up their industry categories under more general headers like "manufacturing". So you could be a "marketing" professional but be within the manufacturing industry. To be forthright, it's a little confusing. (This is why we have decided to exclude Michigan Ross from some categories until we gather a little more insight into their self-reported numbers.)

None-the-less, we have tried to make sense of it all and to do this we did combine some categories in order to get an apples-to-apples comparison across schools. Clear as mud?
WHY WE USE EMPLOYMENT DATA TO RANK SCHOOLS
Our opinion is that recruiting (i.e. who's hiring) drives most programs "investment" decisions - in students, faculty, courses, experiential initiatives, alumni outreach, etc.  So to know to what a specific MBA program is really all about, you need to see the end result. In other words, what industries are hiring MBA graduates and from what schools?

We compiled this ranking based on information taken directly from the following MBA employment reports.

Haas http://haas.berkeley.edu/groups/careercenter/reports/14-15ReportSummary.pdf

UCLA Anderson http://www.anderson.ucla.edu/Documents/areas/adm/cmc/2014%20PARKER%20CMC%20Employment%20Report%2002.10.15%20LR.pdf

Stanford GSB https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/documents/Stanford%20GSB%20Employment%20Report%202013-14.pdf

MIT Sloan http://mitsloan.mit.edu/pdf/Class_of_2014-intern_employment_report.pdf

HBS http://www.hbs.edu/recruiting/mba/data-and-statistics/employment-statistics.html

Wharton http://www.wharton.upenn.edu/mba/your-career/career-statistics.cfm

Kellogg http://www.kellogg.northwestern.edu/career_employer/employment_statistics.aspx

Chicago Booth http://www.chicagobooth.edu/employmentreport/

Columbia https://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/recruiters/employmentreport

NYU Stern http://www.stern.nyu.edu/programs-admissions/full-time-mba/career/employment-statistics

Tuck http://www.tuck.dartmouth.edu/careers/employment-statistics

Yale SOM http://som.yale.edu/yale-som-connect/recruiting/employment-statistics

Michigan Ross http://michiganross.umich.edu/our-community/recruiters

Duke Fuqua http://www.fuqua.duke.edu/mba_recruiting/recruiting_duke/employment_statistics/

Cornell Johnson http://www.johnson.cornell.edu/Career-Management/Employment-Report-for-Two-Year-MBAs

UVA Darden http://www.darden.virginia.edu/recruiters-companies/hire-an-mba/employment-reports/
FINALLY, DOES THE WORLD REALLY NEED ANOTHER BUSINESS SCHOOL RANKING?
We think "yes". We've never felt completely comfortable with the rankings because (to our knowledge) the raw data that drives the US News and Businessweek rankings has never been fully disclosed. So we decided to start over and with the very numbers that the school's career centers are reporting via their respective employment reporting.

That being said, we welcome any constructive feedback you may have. Email us at MBA@amerasiaconsulting.com with comments or if you're looking for an expert admissions consultant to lead you through the application process.
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Download Our Columbia Business School Application Guide (Updated for 2  [#permalink]

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New post 25 May 2015, 23:19
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By Adam Hoff and Paul Lanzillotti, Amerasia Consulting Group

Our updated 2015/2016 “How to Apply to Columbia” guide is now available for immediate download. This 12-page PDF is the starting point for prospective MBA applicants to CBS and is provided to at no cost.  Download the Columbia Business School Guide >

Columbia is one of the most interesting and unique business schools in the world, defined by what we see as a series of unique contradictions (no fault of the school’s, we might add).  It’s a program with incredible international resources, yet is a draw for many international candidates primarily because it is seen as so quintessentially “American” being in New York City.   And the location creates another curious push-pull, which is that being in Manhattan gives CBS a huge resource advantage and almost a “business school buffet” where students can access anything and everything they need … yet Columbia must battle against having a “commuter school” feel more than just about any other program by virtue of so many students already living in New York before attending.  Then, of course, there is the Employment Report.  Perhaps no other business school combines the traits of “incredible launching pad for careers” and “very concerned about applicants’ career goals” quite like Columbia.  On its face, many of these contradictions seem like problems, but they aren’t.  They can actually make for an incredible b-school experience … as well as a chance to candidates to thread a needle and show just how perfect they can be for Columbia.

What does this mean and what does it look like for your candidacy?  In a nutshell, it means that Columbia pays closer attention to your career goals (particularly in the short term) than any other business school … which is saying something considering how carefully most MBA programs are checking out short-term goals.  One might go so far as to call Columbia “paternalistic” in their approach, but at the very least, the school is being extremely cautious about who it admits into the program and is using career services as a sounding board to help determine whether specific career aspirations are achievable with a Columbia MBA.   Further, it means showcasing how you will get involved, be part of a community, and bring a unique, expansive perspective with you to campus.

All of this actually serves to create a wonderful opening for those students who are able to probably identify what matters most to Columbia and then communicate a desire to be part of the school’s transformation, while also showing a nuanced and balanced understanding of both the power and limitation of an MBA as it related to securing a job.

If that sounds intimidating, you can rest easy in knowing that we have created this 10-step approach to applying to Columbia.  The following guide will help you understand all of the key hot button issues and major thematic touch points – as well as critical admissions strategies – that will make or break your prospects for gaining admission to one of the world’s most famous business schools.

Download the Columbia Business School Guide >
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Re: Stanford GSB: Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jun 2015, 19:55
In! (out of the wait pool) Have the Dean Bolton voicemail to prove it.
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Apply to business school like you're running for office. You're the candidate. We're your campaign managers.
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Download Our Harvard Business School Application Guide (Updated for 20  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jun 2015, 22:36
Our updated (June 2015) “How to Apply to HBS” Guide is the starting point for a prospective applicant to the Harvard Business School. This 15-page white paper is available for immediate download and is provided to prospective applicants at no cost.
Our 10-step guide will help you understand all of the key hot button issues and major thematic touch points – as well as critical admissions strategies and tips – that will make or break your prospects for gaining admission to the world’s most coveted business schools.

Download the Harvard Business School Guide >[/b]

Excerpt:

In the admissions consulting business, we love to ask the question, "Where are you applying?"  And applicants appear to equally enjoy giving an answer that starts with "HBS, of course."  HBS, of course.  The first rule of applying to Harvard Business School is to understand that everyone applies to Harvard Business School.  Applying to HBS isn't a novel exercise, but rather the first box on a checklist for virtually every candidate pursuing an MBA from an elite program.

So what does this mean you shouldn't apply to HBS?  Of course not.  But it does mean two critical things:

1.    Your interest in HBS must rise above "it's HBS"
2.    You absolutely must do everything right

To the latter point, doing things “right” includes not just what you do, but what you don’t do.  It’s about handling your business with total confidence, self-possession, assuredness, and mastery.  It’s about stepping into a world of ambiguity and not breaking even a hint of a sweat.  Harvard has so much talent to choose from that it’s almost an impossible task to sort it out, so one thing they have done is introduced some stress and then watched to see who handles it.  Basically, you don’t have to be perfect when you apply to Harvard, but you have to be perfectly composed.  You have to own who you are, know when and where your personal expectations took shape, understand the path you are on, and – above all else – know how to put one foot in front of the other without doubting yourself along the way.

Quite honestly, if you are a legit candidate at HBS and have dreams of going there, this is a place to invest some resources and hire someone who can coach you through the process.  You will not only submit a better app and stay closer to that ideal of perfection, but you will also grow and evolve as a person – that’s just the kind of app process it is.  Nothing builds character more than navigating ambiguity and coming out the other side.  For those who can’t afford services, we have created this 10-step approach to applying to HBS that can at least help you set the right path.  Indeed, the following guide will help keep you on the straight and narrow as you undertake the nerve-racking task of applying to the world's most famous business school.
Download the Harvard Business School Guide >
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Re: Stanford GSB: Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jul 2015, 11:14
The MBA Recruiting Process – Insights from Darden ’15 Grad and CEO of RelishMBA

Hello from the RelishMBA team, and congratulations on being admitted to the MBA Class of 2017! My name is Sarah, and I’m a recent Darden School of Business graduate who founded RelishMBA, an online recruiting platform built specifically for the business school recruiting market. As a recent grad who works full-time in the MBA recruitment space, I wanted to share some recruiting advice and tips to help you prepare for arriving on campus at Stanford.

The first thing to be aware of is that MBA recruiting is a long and intense process. Recruiting activities begin quickly once you’re on campus and they take up a huge amount of your time and energy for most of your first year. While virtually all top MBA students have great jobs available to them, finding those jobs can be frustrating and stressful, with relevant information often hard to find and a complex networking process that can be tough to effectively manage. I started RelishMBA to address these problems and make the process more efficient for both students and employers.

The summer is a great time to get started with recruiting processes (while you don’t have to worry about school, student clubs, social life, and the dozens of other activities that fill up your time during first year). Luckily, there are a few things you can do to prepare before school starts in August: Relax. Explore. Prepare.

Relax – business school is a big change from the working world; take a bit of time off. You deserve it and you’ll need the break!

Explore – In your time relaxing, begin checking out what industries and companies recruit MBAs. This is something RelishMBA helps with. Sign-up at RelishMBA.com to begin exploring employer’s company pages on MBA Careers specific for your school (“day in the life” alumni testimonials, on-campus presence, key points of contact, etc.).

Prepare – And lastly, get your resume ready. Below are some tips from my experience.
It’s also important to remember that once you’re on campus, you’ll be networking with recruiters and alumni frequently – and RelishMBA will help you here too, through relationship management tools that make it easy to stay on top of your networking game. Have any questions? Reach out anytime at recruit@relishmba.com.

Resume Tips:

1) Writing your resume is your first Marketing assignment

Your resume is essentially a one-page advertisement designed to sell your brand to employers. But as your first year marketing class will tell you, marketing is about a lot more than just a fancy design and a few well-placed buzzwords. Think about your audience (i.e. who will be reading your resume? Finance recruiters? Consultants? Marketers? Others?) and how you are positioning yourself with that audience (i.e. what work experiences would be most relevant or interesting to the recruiters reading your resume?).

For example, if you’re headed up to Wall Street, focus on the more quantitatively rigorous parts of your work experience, and try to make sure that your resume as a whole reflects an interest in and passion for finance and its associated disciplines. Future consultants will want to highlight problem-solving and analytical thinking. Marketers could talk about leading cross-functional teams or point out examples of especially effective communication.

And if you are not sure what you want to do, don’t sweat it – there are lots of you out there, and it’s no big deal for the next few weeks or months. But regardless of your eventual industry or function targets, remember: your resume is not just a chronicle of your past work achievements; it is an advertisement designed to effectively sell you and your brand to recruiters.

2) Be concise but specific

This is one of the more difficult parts of honing your resume: providing specific examples of relevant work accomplishments in a way that a recruiter can easily digest in a few seconds. Try starting each bullet point with a strong action word. Instead of saying something like “Helped to more than double sales during tenure in catchment area,” try something like “Launched blogger outreach program that increased web traffic by 72% and increased sales by 120%”.

These sorts of hard numbers are really helpful, especially since many recruiters will spend only a few seconds looking at your resume and those numbers stand out on the page. So it’s also important to be sure that your bullet points can be read and processed easily. And if you don’t have a lot of specific numbers to add to your resume, it’s still important to be specific about your accomplishments and to pick your words wisely.

3) Add some flair

You should be careful with how much flair you add to your resume, but it’s a good idea to think of ways to set yourself apart from the competition. The “Personal” section at the bottom of your resume, where you list hobbies, activities, and interests, is an easy place to hook a recruiter (or break the ice in an interview). Only mention things that are truly a part of your life, but still consider your audience and which of your hobbies or experiences might be of interest to the recruiters reading your resumes. Once you reach campus, you’ll hear plenty of stories about students who were able to land first or even second-round interviews largely on the basis of what seem like minor resume items.

Other ways to add flair:

-Were you kind of a big deal in college? It’s worthwhile to mention any particularly important or impressive extracurriculars from your undergrad days (particularly leadership roles), and including club affiliations and other school-specific positions can be a good idea once you get onto campus

-Recruiters are looking to hire real people, not business robots. Make sure your resume – the accomplishments you choose to mention, the structure and content of the Personal section – reflects your personality.

4) Don’t be careless

This is the part where we tell you that a few people every year submit resumes with misspelled words or mismatched fonts or other significant but easily avoidable mistakes, and that you could be one of those people if you’re not careful, and you think “I’d never be that much of an idiot,” and then you send your resume to McKinsey or Google with your name spelled wrong at the top. Don’t be that person.
Seriously, just get a friend to read it. Several friends. Have a resume-reading party. But don’t spell your name wrong.

Have any questions? Reach out anytime at recruit@relishmba.com

Sincerely,
RelishMBA Team

_________________
RelishMBA is a centralized recruiting platform designed to streamline how students at top business school connect with the companies that recruit them. With filtered search tools and customizable profile pages, students and recruiters can find and target candidates and firms with the best fit. Access all of your school’s recruiting resources from one platform and easily track your networking relationships. An exclusive network for MBAs, Career Services, and Employers.
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Re: Stanford GSB: Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Mar 2016, 10:22
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Re: Stanford GSB: Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Apr 2016, 20:26
Hey,

Anybody active in here?
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Re: Stanford GSB: Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!   [#permalink] 24 Apr 2016, 20:26

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