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Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens

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Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 19 May 2018, 21:29
2
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A
B
C
D
E

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Question Stats:

88% (00:46) correct 12% (01:01) wrong based on 1724 sessions

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The Official Guide for GMAT Review, 10th Edition, 2003

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 122
Page: 671

Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens of thousands of ideographic characters, each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its own square frame.

(A) each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its

(B) all the characters a miniature calligraphic composition inside their

(C) all the characters a miniature calligraphic composition inside its

(D) every character a miniature calligraphic composition inside their

(E) each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside their

Originally posted by nick_sun on 17 Apr 2007, 10:24.
Last edited by hazelnut on 19 May 2018, 21:29, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Apr 2012, 07:57
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Hi All,
Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens of thousands of ideographic characters, each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its own square frame.

Image

The meaning of this sentence is easy to understand. Chinese is the most ancient of living writing systems. It consists of tens and thousands of ideographic characters. Each character is a miniature calligraphic composition inside its own square frame.

Image

Usage of “each” is correct in this sentence. It denotes every individual character of tens and thousands of characters that the writing system has. Singular pronoun “its” also agrees in number with “each” and also the phrase “a miniature calligraphic composition”, which is singular in number, agrees in number with “each”. Hence this sentence is correct as is.

POE

Choice A: Correct for above mentioned reasons.

Choice B: all the characters a miniature calligraphic composition inside their. Incorrect. Singular phrase “a miniature calligraphic composition” has been used to refer to plural “all characters”. Again, plural pronoun “their” does not agree in number with singular “composition”.

Choice C: all the characters a miniature calligraphic composition inside its. Incorrect. This choice repeats the first mistake of choice B. Singular phrase “a miniature calligraphic composition” has been used to refer to plural “all characters”.

Choice D: every character a miniature calligraphic composition inside their. Incorrect. Plural pronoun “their” agrees in number neither with its antecedent “every” nor with singular “composition”.

Choice E: each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside their. Incorrect. Plural pronoun “their” agrees in number neither with its antecedent “each” nor with singular “composition”.

Image


1. “All” is used for plural entities.
2. “Each” and “every” are always singular.
3. Pronouns must agree in number with their antecedents.

PS: “Each” denotes every individual entity in the collective group while “every” refers to the all the entities in that group. In this sentence, if there were a choice that read: every character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its, then also this choice would be correct as it conveys the same meaning.
Hope this helps.

Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Apr 2007, 23:01
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nick_sun wrote:
Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens of thousands of ideographic characters, each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its own square frame.

(A) each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its
(B) all the characters a miniature calligraphic composition inside their
(C) all the characters a miniature calligraphic composition inside its
(D) every character a miniature calligraphic composition inside their
(E) each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside their


D, E - every character - thier doesn't match
C - same problem
B - changes the meaning
A - perfectly fine.
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Re: Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Mar 2008, 21:41
Please advice of the EACH and EVERY for this question.

Sahil's note
The dog has bitten my younger son twice, and each time, he has had to be sent
to his kennel.
(A) each time, he has had to be sent to his
(B) every time, it has had to be sent to his
(C)each time, it has had to be sent to its
(D)every time, it has had to be sent to its
(E)each time, he has had to be sent to its


‘Each time’ because it has bitten only twice. The use of the pronoun "he" is unclear here -
does it refer to the dog or to the son? In fact, tracing our way back along the sentence,
we find that we come across the word "son" before we come across the word "dog",
which rather implies that it is the son who owns, and is sent to, the kennel.
The way to get round this ambiguity is to use "it" followed by "its" (no apostrophe!). This
limits the choices to (C) and (D). The only difference between these options is the fact
that one uses the word "every" and the other uses the word "each". Since these refer to
the two times that the dog bit the son, we shouldn't use "every" (that refers to three or
more times). The correct option is therefore (C).



Using Each was to have only 2 chinese characters in the language...
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Re: Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Apr 2012, 07:13
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A it is and here is why:

(A) each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its

(B) all the characters {awkward} a miniature calligraphic composition inside their{Wrong pronoun should be its}

(C) all the characters {awkward} a miniature calligraphic composition inside its

(D) every character a miniature calligraphic composition inside their{Wrong pronoun should be its}

(E) each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside their{Wrong pronoun should be its}

Consider a kudos if you like the way I explain


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Re: Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Dec 2013, 20:07
Friends,
In choice A, do not we need "is" between "each character" and "a miniature"?
Thanks for the explanation
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Re: Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Dec 2013, 04:22
Hi there,

Since this is a noun + noun modifier, we don't need the verb 'is'. Adding 'is' will make the part after the comma an independent clause, and two independent clauses cannot be separated by just a comma. We would need to change the comma into a semicolon, or add a connecting word.

I hope this helps!

Regards,
Meghna
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Re: Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2017, 22:30
Hi Experts,

I had a quick doubt on the portion after comma in this sentence. Can you please tell me what type of construction is this - "each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its own square frame" ? I read on the forums that it is a NOUN + Noun Modifier. But if that is the case, why is there no relative pronoun to start the noun modifier? Also, the phrase a miniature calligraphic composition has to agree with the Noun number? Is this construction sort of an exception? Any advice on how to identify noun + noun modifier usage without a relative pronoun? Thanks for your help.

YT
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Re: Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Apr 2017, 07:37
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I'm not 100% sure that I'm interpreting your question correctly, yt770. But I'll take a shot, anyway!

You definitely don't always need a relative pronoun (such as "that" or "which" or "who") to start a noun modifier. Consider the following:

    Donald Trump, an orange-haired politician, likes taco salads.

No problem, right? The noun "an orange-haired politician" just modifies the noun "Donald Trump." And we can make it more complicated, but it's still OK to have a noun directly modify a noun, without using a relative pronoun:

    Dr. Boiko voted for Donald Trump, an orange-haired politician obsessed with his hand size and approval ratings.

Or try this one:

    Dr. Boiko voted for two Republicans, each an orange-haired politician obsessed with his hand size and approval ratings.

This is still fine: the last part of the sentence is still just a noun modifying a noun. Sure, "two Republicans" is plural, but the second part of the sentence is just a modifier that gives us extra information about each of them. By using the singular "each", it becomes OK to use the singular pronoun "his."

The original question in this thread isn't terribly different:

    Chinese... consists of tens of thousands of ideographic characters, each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its own square frame.

The last half of the sentence is just a noun phrase that modifies the noun "characters." It might not sound like normal speech, but it's not all that different from using any other noun to modify a noun. No relative pronoun is necessary in any of these examples.

I'm not sure if I answered your questions, but I hope this helps!
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Re: Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Sep 2018, 06:03
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Re: Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens &nbs [#permalink] 25 Sep 2018, 06:03
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