GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 09 Dec 2018, 21:11

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in December
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
2526272829301
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
303112345
Open Detailed Calendar
  • Free GMAT Algebra Webinar

     December 09, 2018

     December 09, 2018

     07:00 AM PST

     09:00 AM PST

    Attend this Free Algebra Webinar and learn how to master Inequalities and Absolute Value problems on GMAT.
  • Free lesson on number properties

     December 10, 2018

     December 10, 2018

     10:00 PM PST

     11:00 PM PST

    Practice the one most important Quant section - Integer properties, and rapidly improve your skills.

Confused by the different usage of semicolon for a similar statement

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 24 Jul 2018
Posts: 32
Location: India
GMAT 1: 690 Q46 V38
GPA: 4
CAT Tests
Confused by the different usage of semicolon for a similar statement  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Aug 2018, 02:35
1) While cleaning the room, I found a pen; this belonged to Joe. (incorrect)

2) King George is the ruler of the largest empire; its size as large as a continent. (correct)

After going through the details, I found that statement 1 is incorrect since "this" is ambigous, however statement 2 is considered correct.
Could someone shed some light please?
Director
Director
avatar
V
Joined: 30 Jan 2016
Posts: 823
Location: United States (MA)
Reviews Badge
Confused by the different usage of semicolon for a similar statement  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Aug 2018, 07:10
Hi 55555Raj,

"This" in the first sentence is ambiguous because "this" can refer to the room and/or the pen.

The semicolon (;) connects two closely related statements. Each statement must be able to stand alone as an independent sentence. It is fine to use the pronoun in the second part.
The second sentence misses the verb in "its size as large as a continent." Are you sure you that part is correct?
_________________

Non progredi est regredi

Director
Director
User avatar
D
Joined: 11 Feb 2015
Posts: 608
Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: Confused by the different usage of semicolon for a similar statement  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Aug 2018, 07:36
1
I agree with the point made by Akela

"this" in statement 1 is ambiguous

You may like to go through the following:-

GMAT Sentence Correction: Semicolons [Source: Kaplan]

There are two absolutely central and simple rules for the use of the semicolon (“;”), and learning these will improve both your Sentence Correction skills and your writing in general — remember, in addition to getting lots of questions right on the GMAT, you will need to write actual sentences on your AWA, in your personal statement, and in your MBA classes! The rules for the use of the semicolon are:

1) When writing a list of things, and those listed things have commas themselves, separate the items in the list with semicolons.


Semicolons and Lists

The first is the simpler of the two. According to the first rule, the semicolon acts as a kind of “meta-comma,” a bigger divider separating the other dividers properly so that the reader can make sense of a list:

“Erika loves to travel and has visited many places: Iona, Scotland, Seattle, Washington, Beijing, China, and Calgary, Alberta.”

A less careful reader might think she’s visited eight different places rather than four; a careful reader will get it right, but may well become frustrated with the author. A semicolon makes it clearer:

“Erika loves to travel, and has visited many places: Iona, Scotland; Seattle, Washington; Beijing, China; and Calgary, Alberta.”

You might also see commas setting off modifying phrases within a list:

“Henrik couldn’t stand to eat certain foods: sushi, which made him jealous of people who lived near the sea; anything that came from sheep, such as lamb and mutton; and peaches, because the fuzz gave him the chills.”

It’s not important to remember any of the different reasons you might have commas within your list, though, as long as you remember to separate your list items (when you do have commas within them) with the “meta-comma,” the semicolon.

2) When joining two related independent clauses (“complete sentences”) into a single sentence, place a semicolon between them.

The second of the two semicolon uses requires a definition: the clause. In grammatical terms, a clause has a subject and a verb. Clauses are either independent or dependent; independent clauses can stand on their own as complete sentences ( . . . which is why they’re labeled “independent”), while dependent clauses cannot.


Hope it helps you!!

All the best!!
_________________

"Please hit :thumbup: +1 Kudos if you like this post" :student_man:

_________________
Manish :geek:

"Only I can change my life. No one can do it for me"

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 24 Jul 2018
Posts: 32
Location: India
GMAT 1: 690 Q46 V38
GPA: 4
CAT Tests
Re: Confused by the different usage of semicolon for a similar statement  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Aug 2018, 17:45
Akela wrote:
Hi 55555Raj,

"This" in the first sentence is ambiguous because "this" can refer to the room and/or the pen.

The semicolon (;) connects two closely related statements. Each statement must be able to stand alone as an independent sentence. It is fine to use the pronoun in the second part.
The second sentence misses the verb in "its size as large as a continent." Are you sure you that part is correct?


Thank you Akela, yes the 2nd statement is correct according to e-gmat. I made a note of the sentence weeks back though, so can't exactly point out where from e-gmat.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 24 Jul 2018
Posts: 32
Location: India
GMAT 1: 690 Q46 V38
GPA: 4
CAT Tests
Re: Confused by the different usage of semicolon for a similar statement  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Aug 2018, 17:46
CAMANISHPARMAR wrote:
I agree with the point made by Akela

"this" in statement 1 is ambiguous

You may like to go through the following:-

GMAT Sentence Correction: Semicolons [Source: Kaplan]

There are two absolutely central and simple rules for the use of the semicolon (“;”), and learning these will improve both your Sentence Correction skills and your writing in general — remember, in addition to getting lots of questions right on the GMAT, you will need to write actual sentences on your AWA, in your personal statement, and in your MBA classes! The rules for the use of the semicolon are:

1) When writing a list of things, and those listed things have commas themselves, separate the items in the list with semicolons.


Semicolons and Lists

The first is the simpler of the two. According to the first rule, the semicolon acts as a kind of “meta-comma,” a bigger divider separating the other dividers properly so that the reader can make sense of a list:

“Erika loves to travel and has visited many places: Iona, Scotland, Seattle, Washington, Beijing, China, and Calgary, Alberta.”

A less careful reader might think she’s visited eight different places rather than four; a careful reader will get it right, but may well become frustrated with the author. A semicolon makes it clearer:

“Erika loves to travel, and has visited many places: Iona, Scotland; Seattle, Washington; Beijing, China; and Calgary, Alberta.”

You might also see commas setting off modifying phrases within a list:

“Henrik couldn’t stand to eat certain foods: sushi, which made him jealous of people who lived near the sea; anything that came from sheep, such as lamb and mutton; and peaches, because the fuzz gave him the chills.”

It’s not important to remember any of the different reasons you might have commas within your list, though, as long as you remember to separate your list items (when you do have commas within them) with the “meta-comma,” the semicolon.

2) When joining two related independent clauses (“complete sentences”) into a single sentence, place a semicolon between them.

The second of the two semicolon uses requires a definition: the clause. In grammatical terms, a clause has a subject and a verb. Clauses are either independent or dependent; independent clauses can stand on their own as complete sentences ( . . . which is why they’re labeled “independent”), while dependent clauses cannot.


Hope it helps you!!

All the best!!


This is very useful, thank you!
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Confused by the different usage of semicolon for a similar statement &nbs [#permalink] 18 Aug 2018, 17:46
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Confused by the different usage of semicolon for a similar statement

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.