GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 18 Dec 2018, 13:32

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in December
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
2526272829301
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
303112345
Open Detailed Calendar
  • Happy Christmas 20% Sale! Math Revolution All-In-One Products!

     December 20, 2018

     December 20, 2018

     10:00 PM PST

     11:00 PM PST

    This is the most inexpensive and attractive price in the market. Get the course now!
  • Key Strategies to Master GMAT SC

     December 22, 2018

     December 22, 2018

     07:00 AM PST

     09:00 AM PST

    Attend this webinar to learn how to leverage Meaning and Logic to solve the most challenging Sentence Correction Questions.

Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 26 Apr 2007
Posts: 49
Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 10 Dec 2018, 09:27
1
5
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  45% (medium)

Question Stats:

61% (00:55) correct 39% (01:07) wrong based on 230 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the relations between nations that illustrates what is wrong with alliances and treaties that do not have popular support.


(A) relations between nations that illustrates

(B) relation of one nation with another that illustrates

(C) relations between nations that illustrate

(D) relation of one nation with another and illustrate

(E) relations of nations that illustrates

Originally posted by vishalsuri on 07 Jul 2007, 12:42.
Last edited by Bunuel on 10 Dec 2018, 09:27, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
Most Helpful Expert Reply
Manhattan Prep Instructor
User avatar
Affiliations: ManhattanGMAT
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 335
Location: San Francisco
Re: Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Sep 2010, 20:21
5
Hey All,

I got a message saying this one is three years old and waiting for me. Excitement!

254. Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the relations between nations that illustrates what is wrong with alliances and treaties that do not have popular support.

(A) relations between nations that illustrates
PROBLEM: Subject-verb agreement. The subject here is "episodes," which is plural, so we need "illustrate."

(B) relation of one nation with another that illustrates
PROBLEM: Subject-verb agreement. The subject here is "episodes," which is plural, so we need "illustrate."

(C) relations between nations that illustrate
ANSWER - The thing people don't like here is "between," because we use "between" to talk about two things and "among" for more than two. However, I imagine there's a reading of this sentence in which we're talking about various relations between TWO countries (at a time), as in the relation between the US and Canada AND the relationship between US and Mexico at once, so we could describe that as "relations between nations". Sounds passable to me.

(D) relation of one nation with another and illustrate
PROBLEM: You have to say "relations between nations" or "relation of one nation TO another."

(E) relations of nations that illustrates
PROBLEM: Subject-verb agreement. The subject here is "episodes," which is plural, so we need "illustrate."

Fun!

-t
_________________


Tommy Wallach | Manhattan GMAT Instructor | San Francisco


Manhattan GMAT Discount | Manhattan GMAT Reviews

General Discussion
CEO
CEO
User avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2007
Posts: 2604
Location: New York City
Re: Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Jul 2007, 10:20
OA is B.

It cannot be relations between nations because between is used for only two parties whereas we are talking about various parties (because we are talking about treaties and alliances)

my only question is what is illustrates in agreement with?
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 29 Aug 2005
Posts: 767
Re: Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Jul 2007, 03:59
Singular Subjects, Plural Predicates, etc.

See below or click on the link: http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/ ... #irregular


We frequently run into a situation in which a singular subject is linked to a plural predicate:

E.g. My favorite breakfast is cereal with fruit, milk, orange juice, and toast.

Sometimes, too, a plural subject can be linked to singular predicate:

E.g. Mistakes in parallelism are the only problem here.

In such situations, remember that the number (singular or plural) of the subject, not the predicate, determines the number of the verb. See the section on Subject-Verb Agreement for further help.

A special situation exists when a subject seems not to agree with its predicate. For instance, when we want each student to see his or her counselor (and each student is assigned to only one counselor), but we want to avoid that "his or her" construction by pluralizing, do we say "Students must see their counselors" or "Students must see their counselor"? The singular counselor is necesssary to avoid the implication that students have more than one counselor apiece. Do we say "Many sons dislike their father or fathers"? We don't mean to suggest that the sons have more than one father, so we use the singular father. Theodore Bernstein, in Dos, Don'ts and Maybes of English Usage, says that "Idiomatically the noun applying to more than one person remains in the singular when (a) it represents a quality or thing possessed in common ("The audience's curiosity was aroused"); or (b) it is an abstraction ("The judges applied their reason to the problem"), or (c) it is a figurative word ("All ten children had a sweet tooth") (203). Sometimes good sense will have to guide you. We might want to say "Puzzled, the children scratched their head" to avoid the image of multi-headed children, but "The audience rose to their foot" is plainly ridiculous and about to tip over.

In "The boys moved their car/cars," the plural would indicate that each boy owned a car, the singular that the boys (together) owned one car (which is quite possible). It is also possible that each boy owned more than one car. Be prepared for such situations, and consider carefully the implications of using either the singular or the plural. You might have to avoid the problem by going the opposite direction of pluralizing: moving things to the singular and talking about what each boy did.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 20 Jul 2010
Posts: 123
Re: Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Jul 2010, 20:46
1
I am in favor of C...
I was looking for among in the answer choices, presuming more than 2 nations to be involved, but none of the choices features an "among"...
_________________

Gotta hit the 700 score this time... 3rd time lucky !
Give me some kudos... Like you, even I need them badly ;)

Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 07 Nov 2015
Posts: 20
Location: China
GMAT 1: 710 Q50 V37
Re: Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Nov 2015, 05:43
bmwhype2 wrote:
OA is B.

It cannot be relations between nations because between is used for only two parties whereas we are talking about various parties (because we are talking about treaties and alliances)

my only question is what is illustrates in agreement with?


OA is B.
In GMAT, here are two facts that always hold:
(1) In a prepositional phrase, the noun after the preposition can NEVER be the subject of a sentence.
(2) An attributive clause always describes the CLOSEST subject.

(A) relations between (nations that illustrates)
Wrong. Nations cannot illustrate what is wrong. Their relation can.

(B) relation (of one nation with another) that illustrates
Correct.

(C) relations between (nations that illustrate)
Wrong. Same as A.

(D) relation of one nation with another and illustrate
Wrong. In this sentence the action "illustrate" is sent out by Dr. Sayre. However the tense is incorrect, and it changed the meaning of the sentence.

(E) relations of (nations that illustrates)
Wrong. Same as A, and the verb "illustrates" doesn't follow its subject "nations"
Non-Human User
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 3545
Premium Member
Re: Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Dec 2018, 09:41
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
_________________

-
April 2018: New Forum dedicated to Verbal Strategies, Guides, and Resources

GMAT Club Bot
Re: Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the &nbs [#permalink] 10 Dec 2018, 09:41
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Dr. Sayre’s lecture recounted several little-known episodes in the

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.