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Re: During his time as the foreign minister of Belgium [#permalink]
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aditya8062 wrote:
D seems best here :a strong proponent of forward-looking diplomatic policy, pleased many of his most enthusiastic allies by proposing that collective defense be

though i can eliminate A for various other reason such as "that collective defense should be", i feel that usage of "as he was a strong proponent of forward-looking diplomatic policy, pleased many of his most enthusiastic allies.." is some how wrong. I believe that the construction is "as X ,Y ",where both X and Y are clauses. However in A in the construction of comma + Y the subject "Pierre Harmel" is left behind
I will appreciate if some expert can verify this point

Dear aditya8062,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

In all honesty, I am not completely impressed with this question. I am not convinced that it adheres to the rigorous standards of the GMAT SC.

Clearly, (D) is the most concise and elegant answer. In (A), the first half is 100% grammatically correct: the phrase "as he was a strong proponent of forward-looking diplomatic policy" is a perfectly constructed clause. The SVA is fine --- "Pierre Harmel ... pleased" ... One problem with (A) lies in the subtle idiomatic issue. The construction:
"... Harmel .... pleased [people] by his proposal" or "by proposing"
is 100% grammatically and idiomatically correct, whereas the construction
"... Harmel .... pleased [people] in his proposal" or "in proposing"
is in a funny gray zone ---- not radiantly correct, but not clearly wrong either. This could conceivable be acceptable.

One could argue, I suppose, that "propose that X be ...." is sufficient, and that "propose that X should be ...." is a little redundant. Hmmm. I don't know. I could see that argument, but I am not sure this is something wrong enough to eliminate an answer.

The only real unambiguous complaint against (A) is that it is a bit wordy and indirect and passive --- first, the "as" clause instead of a simple appositive phrase, and then the noun "proposal" instead of the gerund "proposing." I think it's much harder to eliminate (E).

I don't know. The whole question leaves me with a wishy-washy feeling, not the unambiguous clarity of the GMAT SC.

Also, WoundedTiger, you wrong: "Now word proposal is subjunctive and hence the construction needs to have plural verb." I am going to quibble with you about terminology.
... proposal that a woman fly a fighter jet ....
... proposal that Andrea Bocelli sing the national anthem ...
... proposal that this book be banned ...

Those underlined verbs are NOT plural verbs. They are verbs in the subjunctive mood, which are also identical to the infinitive form of the verb. As it happens, for almost all verb, the infinitive form is also identical to the present tense plural form of the verb in the indicative mood, but it is incorrect to call the verbs that appear here "plural." See:
https://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-gramm ... ive-tense/

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: During his time as the foreign minister of Belgium [#permalink]
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Re: During his time as the foreign minister of Belgium [#permalink]
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