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During mediaeval times, the administrative system

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During mediaeval times, the administrative system  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jul 2018, 21:15
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  95% (hard)

Question Stats:

36% (01:37) correct 64% (01:21) wrong based on 218 sessions

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During mediaeval times, the administrative system was organized such that jobs were traditionally held within the same family. The eldest son of the village's blacksmith will take up his father’s business and become the next blacksmith. The other sons would join the army or serve the king in some fashion while the daughters did what their mother did. Although the world has undergone innumerable changes, the dynastic system has not undergone any change whatsoever. Children who have fathers who played major league baseball are 800 times more likely than other kids to become major league players themselves.

Which of the following best refutes the author's reasoning?

A. In countries with a royal family, the eldest son of the king is destined to be the next king.

B. The blacksmith's eldest son in a mediaeval village could not choose any other profession even if he wanted to.

C. A major baseball player will have better knowledge and skills and will be able to guide his son better.

D. 60℅ of the country's doctors have at least one parent who is a doctor.

E. It is a proven fact that success in any career is determined more by skill and practice rather than by genetic makeup.

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Re: During mediaeval times, the administrative system  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jul 2018, 19:17
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OFFICIAL SOLUTION

The argument draws parallels between the medieval and modern times and concludes that the dynastic system of sons taking on their fathers’ jobs has not changed over the years. To make the point, the author gives an example of blacksmiths in medieval times and baseball players today. In order to question the credibility of the argument, the correct option must point out that the times are different and that there need not be a parallel between career systems today and in medieval times.

Option (A) gives one more example of dynastic systems today. If anything, (A) lending further credibility to the argument and is not refuting it. For the same reason, Option (D) can also be eliminated.

Option (C) implies that having a father in the same profession increases the possibility of the son following the father’s footsteps. The reasoning and implication in (C) is probably not as evident as in (A) and (D) but ultimately, (C) lends credibility to the argument, if anything.

Option (E) is possibly a very attractive option. However, the argument does not state that genetic makeup was the reason that people chose a profession; rather it was the accepted practice of the day. Therefore, stating that genetic makeup does not influence the success of a career is irrelevant to the argument. Also, the argument does not discuss “success” in a career at all but just the choice of a career.

Option (B) works because it implies that there was no choice given to those who lived in mediaeval times. The argument, when discussing the “likelihood” of someone becoming a baseball player implies that anyone today has the choice to become one, if they wanted to. Thus, a difference in the systems today and then has been pointed out and the option weakens the author’s reasoning.
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Re: During mediaeval times, the administrative system  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jul 2018, 21:25
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A. In countries with a royal family, the eldest son of the king is destined to be the next king. - strengthens

B. The blacksmith's eldest son in a mediaeval village could not choose any other profession even if he wanted to. - looks good. It says that the son is not left with any option and is forced down the same line.

C. A major baseball player will have better knowledge and skills and will be able to guide his son better. - strengthens

D. 60℅ of the country's doctors have at least one parent who is a doctor. - irrelevant

E. It is a proven fact that success in any career is determined more by skill and practice rather than by genetic makeup - a good contender. But, the argument doesn't talk about how genetics play a role in deciding the career to choose. Hence, incorrect.

Thus, I believe B is best.

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Re: During mediaeval times, the administrative system  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jul 2018, 11:15
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i think c gives another reasoning its not genetics but teaching .
can you explain how b is correct.
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Re: During mediaeval times, the administrative system  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jul 2018, 06:47
viv007 wrote:
i think c gives another reasoning its not genetics but teaching .
can you explain how b is correct.


Hi may be i can help.

Here are two choices.

B. The blacksmith's eldest son in a medieval village could not choose any other profession even if he wanted to.

C. A major baseball player will have better knowledge and skills and will be able to guide his son better.

The argument is that dynastic system is still at play. The reason the author cites for son's occupations is influence of his father. The author goes on to sate his conclusion that such system is still prevalent.

B provides us solid reasoning that puts the conclusion in serious trouble. If there were very few career choices available then economic reasons were responsible for the choices not the dynastic system.

C This may be true but it does not weaken the argument. He may have real interest in that particular. He may choose the sport because of economic reasons.
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Re: During mediaeval times, the administrative system  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jul 2018, 20:37
viv007 wrote:
i think c gives another reasoning its not genetics but teaching .
can you explain how b is correct.


Hi!
I believe you haven't understood the argument properly.

During mediaeval times, the administrative system was organized such that jobs were traditionally held within the same family. The eldest son of the village's blacksmith will take up his father’s business and become the next blacksmith. The other sons would join the army or serve the king in some fashion while the daughters did what their mother did. Although the world has undergone innumerable changes, the dynastic system has not undergone any change whatsoever. Children who have fathers who played major league baseball are 800 times more likely than other kids to become major league players themselves.

Which of the following best refutes the author's reasoning?

A. In countries with a royal family, the eldest son of the king is destined to be the next king.

B. The blacksmith's eldest son in a mediaeval village could not choose any other profession even if he wanted to.

C. A major baseball player will have better knowledge and skills and will be able to guide his son better.

D. 60℅ of the country's doctors have at least one parent who is a doctor.

E. It is a proven fact that success in any career is determined more by skill and practice rather than by genetic makeup.


The author says that the people in mediaeval times joined their father's / mother's profession depending on their gender. The author further says that this passing on of the profession has not changed.
You kind of have to weaken the unstated fact here. A blacksmith's son becomes a blacksmith - Why is it so? You have to find an answer choice which DOES NOT suggest that the kids wanted to be in that profession or have an upperhand because this would weaken the author' reasoning.
The author hasn't explicitly mentioned any reason for this tradition, or whatever you may call it. For this question it was imperative that you read between the lines.

Hope this helps.

Regards,
Vaibhav
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Regards,

Vaibhav



Sky is the limit. 800 is the limit.

~GMAC

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Re: During mediaeval times, the administrative system  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Oct 2018, 06:55
vaibhav1221 wrote:
....For this question it was imperative that you read between the lines.

Hope this helps.

Regards,
Vaibhav


I cannot agree with you! In my opinion, you DO NOT read between the lines in GMAT; moreover, you have to stick to what is given and do not make any other assumptions.
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Re: During mediaeval times, the administrative system &nbs [#permalink] 06 Oct 2018, 06:55
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