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Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage

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Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 25 Oct 2017, 18:53
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Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage building collapsed under the weight of last week’s heavy snowfall. The building was constructed recently and met local building-safety codes in every particular, except that the nails used for attaching roof supports to the building’s columns were of a smaller size than the codes specify for this purpose. Clearly, this collapse exemplifies how even a single, apparently insignificant, departure from safety standards can have severe consequences.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the editorial’s argument?

A. The only other buildings whose roofs collapsed from the weight of the snowfall were older buildings constructed according to less exacting standards than those in the safety codes.

B. Because of the particular location of the equipment-storage building, the weight of snow on its roof was greater than the maximum weight allowed for in the safety codes.

C. Because the equipment-storage building was not intended for human occupation, some safety-code provisions that would have applied to an office building did not apply to it.

D. The columns of the building were no stronger than the building-safety codes required for such a building.

E. Because the equipment-storage building was where the council kept snow-removal equipment, the building was almost completely empty when the roof collapsed.

Same passage with different stem question: LINK

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Originally posted by jet1445 on 15 Jul 2007, 08:26.
Last edited by broall on 25 Oct 2017, 18:53, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage [#permalink]

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New post 28 May 2016, 06:50
1
2
Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage building collapsed under the weight of last week’s heavy snowfall. The building was constructed recently and met local building-safety codes in every particular, except that the nails used for attaching roof supports to the building’s columns were of a smaller size than the codes specify for this purpose. Clearly, this collapse exemplifies how even a single, apparently insignificant, departure from safety standards can have severe consequences.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the editorial’s argument?

Conclusion : Even insignificant departures from safety standards can have severe consequences.


A. The only other buildings whose roofs collapsed from the weight of the snowfall were older buildings constructed according to less exacting standards than those in the safety codes.

Correct answer because it establishes that all other collapsed buildings had lower safety standards. Thus the only case in which collapse occurs is deviation from the safety norms.

B. Because of the particular location of the equipment-storage building, the weight of snow on its roof was greater than the maximum weight allowed for in the safety codes.


Provides an alternate reason for the collapse thereby weakening the argument.

C. Because the equipment-storage building was not intended for human occupation, some safety-code provisions that would have applied to an office building did not apply to it.

Is irrelevant to the argument. The argument tries to establish that any deviation from the given safety norms can have severe consequences so it does not matter if office buildings follow more stringent provisions


D. The columns of the building were no stronger than the building-safety codes required for such a building.

The columns were no stronger does not mean they were weaker than the stipulated norms. In fact it means they were as strong as required by the safety norms. Since they were as per the safety norms they probably did not play a role in the collapse. If they did play a role in the collapse it would mean that the designed safety standards were inadequate , which is an alternative reason for the collapse. In that case the argument would be weakened !

E. Because the equipment-storage building was where the council kept snow-removal equipment, the building was almost completely empty when the roof collapsed.

Irrelevant
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Re: Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage [#permalink]

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New post 13 May 2017, 10:46
jet1445 wrote:
Q21:
Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage building collapsed under the weight of last week’s heavy snowfall. The building was constructed recently and met local building-safety codes in every particular, except that the nails used for attaching roof supports to the building’s columns were of a smaller size than the codes specify for this purpose. Clearly, this collapse exemplifies how even a single, apparently insignificant, departure from safety standards can have severe consequences.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the editorial’s argument?

A. The only other buildings whose roofs collapsed from the weight of the snowfall were older buildings constructed according to less exacting standards than those in the safety codes.
B. Because of the particular location of the equipment-storage building, the weight of snow on its roof was greater than the maximum weight allowed for in the safety codes.
C. Because the equipment-storage building was not intended for human occupation, some safety-code provisions that would have applied to an office building did not apply to it.
D. The columns of the building were no stronger than the building-safety codes required for such a building.
E. Because the equipment-storage building was where the council kept snow-removal equipment, the building was almost completely empty when the roof collapsed.


Hi

I think "E" should be the answer not "A".

The question stress more on the insignificant safety standards. Choice "A" talks about the older building that did not follow all the safety standards. First they are the old buildings, and second they might have ignored the significant safety standards as well. They were bound to collapse under these circumstances.

Answer choice "E" states that the building was empty and all safety standards were met except the most insignificant one. This clearly means that even the most insignificant safety standards can not be ignored.
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Re: Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage [#permalink]

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New post 13 May 2017, 11:22
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ravi11 wrote:
Hi

I think "E" should be the answer not "A".

The question stress more on the insignificant safety standards. Choice "A" talks about the older building that did not follow all the safety standards. First they are the old buildings, and second they might have ignored the significant safety standards as well. They were bound to collapse under these circumstances.

Answer choice "E" states that the building was empty and all safety standards were met except the most insignificant one. This clearly means that even the most insignificant safety standards can not be ignored.


The argument concluded that the collapse can lead to severe consequences. It is based on the assumption that the building collapsed because of that small nail difference.

We need to strengthen this and say yes this was the only building that had not followed some standards and hence, collapsed.

Option A is clearly saying only this building out of those based on new standards collapsed and those old building that did not follow the standards collapsed. Hence, correct.

Option E is saying something about the emptiness of the building. We are nowhere given whether it does matter to have someone or something inside the building during its collapse. So, if a building has to collapse, it will collapse no matter someone/something is there. Also, this point is nowhere relating the collapse to the standards. Hence, 100% incorrect. I tried decoding your point about E, but unfortunately it is highly difficult for me to decode what you are saying about option E.

Let me know in case of any confusion.
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Re: Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage [#permalink]

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New post 27 Sep 2017, 09:04
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jet1445 wrote:
Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage building collapsed under the weight of last week’s heavy snowfall. The building was constructed recently and met local building-safety codes in every particular, except that the nails used for attaching roof supports to the building’s columns were of a smaller size than the codes specify for this purpose. Clearly, this collapse exemplifies how even a single, apparently insignificant, departure from safety standards can have severe consequences.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the editorial’s argument?

A. The only other buildings whose roofs collapsed from the weight of the snowfall were older buildings constructed according to less exacting standards than those in the safety codes.

B. Because of the particular location of the equipment-storage building, the weight of snow on its roof was greater than the maximum weight allowed for in the safety codes.

C. Because the equipment-storage building was not intended for human occupation, some safety-code provisions that would have applied to an office building did not apply to it.

D. The columns of the building were no stronger than the building-safety codes required for such a building.

E. Because the equipment-storage building was where the council kept snow-removal equipment, the building was almost completely empty when the roof collapsed.


PREMISE: roof collapsed under heavy snowfall.
PREMISE: roof met codes EXCEPT for nail size
CONCLUSION: a small departure from standards can have severe consequences.

We're looking for a premise that supports the conclusion that a small departure from standards can have severe consequences.
As we examine each answer choice, we must be sure to remind ourselves of the argument's conclusion....

A. The only other buildings whose roofs collapsed from the weight of the snowfall were older buildings constructed according to less exacting standards than those in the safety codes.
I like it. It certainly strengthens the conclusion that a small departure from standards can have severe consequences.

B. Because of the particular location of the equipment-storage building, the weight of snow on its roof was greater than the maximum weight allowed for in the safety codes.
This weakens the conclusion, since the weight of the snow went beyond safety codes. In other words, the collapse was NOT due to a small departure from standards can have severe consequences.

C. Because the equipment-storage building was not intended for human occupation, some safety-code provisions that would have applied to an office building did not apply to it.
This does not affect the conclusion that a small departure from standards can have severe consequences.

D. The columns of the building were no stronger than the building-safety codes required for such a building.
This does not affect the conclusion that a small departure from standards can have severe consequences.

E. Because the equipment-storage building was where the council kept snow-removal equipment, the building was almost completely empty when the roof collapsed.
This does not affect the conclusion that a small departure from standards can have severe consequences.

Answer: A

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Re: Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage [#permalink]

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New post 27 Sep 2017, 09:17
Thanks GMATPrepNow and Squib17 for the explanations!

To post additional questions not already addressed in this thread, feel free to use the request verbal experts' reply button.
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Re: Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage [#permalink]

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New post 21 Oct 2017, 06:53
jet1445 wrote:
Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage building collapsed under the weight of last week’s heavy snowfall. The building was constructed recently and met local building-safety codes in every particular, except that the nails used for attaching roof supports to the building’s columns were of a smaller size than the codes specify for this purpose. Clearly, this collapse exemplifies how even a single, apparently insignificant, departure from safety standards can have severe consequences.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the editorial’s argument?

A. The only other buildings whose roofs collapsed from the weight of the snowfall were older buildings constructed according to less exacting standards than those in the safety codes.

B. Because of the particular location of the equipment-storage building, the weight of snow on its roof was greater than the maximum weight allowed for in the safety codes.

C. Because the equipment-storage building was not intended for human occupation, some safety-code provisions that would have applied to an office building did not apply to it.

D. The columns of the building were no stronger than the building-safety codes required for such a building.

E. Because the equipment-storage building was where the council kept snow-removal equipment, the building was almost completely empty when the roof collapsed.



This is a strengthen question. Option A is a clear winner as the only other buildings that collapsed were the ones that weren't constructed as per blue print.

B is weakening the argument.

C: I don't care whether it was for human occupation or not. It collapsed dude! Period!

D: Argument doesn't mention it. We are talking about nails, aren't we?

E: Again, don't care what was kept in there.

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Re: Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2018, 10:43
I do not really understand why A) supports the argument, I can't see the connection.

Thank you!
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Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2018, 14:49
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Jabato wrote:
I do not really understand why A) supports the argument, I can't see the connection.

Thank you!

The conclusion of the argument is that a single, apparently insignificant, departure from safety standards can have severe consequences. Here's how the editorial author reaches this conclusion:

  • Northtown Council recently constructed an equipment-storage building that met safety codes in every particular...
  • ...except that nails used for attaching roof supports were smaller than codes specify.
  • After this one, apparently insignificant departure from safety standards, the equipment-storage building's roof collapsed under the weight of heavy snowfall.
  • Therefore, the author concludes that even a single, apparently insignificant departure from safety standards (like using nails that are too small) can have severe consequences (like the roof of a building collapsing).

We're looking for an answer choice that backs up the case of this equipment-storage building. A good choice will provide more evidence that departing from safety standards leads to severe consequences. A good choice could also rule out alternate explanations for the collapse of this equipment-storage building's roof.

Quote:
A. The only other buildings whose roofs collapsed from the weight of the snowfall were older buildings constructed according to less exacting standards than those in the safety codes.

Choice (A) tells us that other roofs collapsed during last week's snowfall. Choice (A) also tells us that the standards followed to construct the other roofs were less exacting (i.e., less strict or demanding) than the standards set by today's safety codes. Consequently, (A) confirms that other buildings constructed with a lack of care for safety standards ended up suffering severe consequences.

Even better, this choice tells us that these were the only other buildings whose roofs collapsed from the weight of last week's snowfall. That reduces the likelihood that there are alternate explanations for this damage:

  • If (A) were not true, then perhaps the roofs of several buildings that met local building-safety codes in EVERY way also collapsed.
  • That evidence would suggest that the roof of the equipment-storage building may have collapsed even if the nails were up to code.
  • In that case, the problem would not have been simply a "single departure from safety standards" (the nails).
  • Instead, the problem would have been that the safety standards were not strict enough to protect against such a heavy snowfall--even roofs of buildings that met the standards collapsed.

But (A) tells us that this was not the case and thus strengthens the argument.

I hope this helps!
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Re: Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2018, 17:19
GMATNinja VeritasPrepKarishma pikolo2510 nightblade354 generis

Can you please validate my PoE:

Quote:
A. The only other buildings whose roofs collapsed from the weight of the snowfall were older buildings constructed according to less exacting standards than those (ie buildings constructed) in the (earlier) safety codes.

I have added my interpretation and underlined words which according to me is a very strong language used by author to prove his point that
small deviations from safety standards can result in severe consequences ie building collapse.

Quote:
D. The columns of the building were no stronger than the building-safety codes required for such a building.


Buildings' columns (same level as) safety codes ??
Nope this is not what I need to strengthen the conclusion. I need to assign a higher priority level to safety codes
to strengthen this argument.
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Re: Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2018, 04:59
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adkikani wrote:
GMATNinja VeritasPrepKarishma pikolo2510 nightblade354 generis

Can you please validate my PoE:

Quote:
A. The only other buildings whose roofs collapsed from the weight of the snowfall were older buildings constructed according to less exacting standards than those (ie buildings constructed) in the (earlier) safety codes.

I have added my interpretation and underlined words which according to me is a very strong language used by author to prove his point that
small deviations from safety standards can result in severe consequences ie building collapse.

Quote:
D. The columns of the building were no stronger than the building-safety codes required for such a building.



Buildings' columns (same level as) safety codes ??
Nope this is not what I need to strengthen the conclusion. I need to assign a higher priority level to safety codes
to strengthen this argument.


Hi adkikani,

Your reasoning is close with (D). The reason (D) doesn't work is because it says no stronger, but does mean that they are weaker? Nope. Therefore, we have no idea whether this violates the conclusion that a single diversion from safety standards can cause issues. They could be just as strong, and this would then defeat our conclusion.

Does this help?
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Re: Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jul 2018, 00:05
Hi mikemcgarry, GMATNinjaTwo, GMATNinja, MagooshExpert Carolyn,
sayantanc2
VeritasPrepKarishma

anyone can elaborate A and D, although many discusses here, i am still confused.
as per A, Does A state that older is one explanation of the collapse. those buildings were older, according to a less exactly standard. So IMO, A weakens the conclusion.
As per D, I an mot absolutely understand "no stronger than", Does it mean weaker? or as strong as ...?
if the columns are as strong as the building-safety codes required for such a building, then i think D strengthen
if the columns are weaker than the building-safety codes required for such a building, then i think D weaken.

Please help...
hope this post won't be sunk into the sea of posts.

Have a nice day
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Re: Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jul 2018, 04:49
zoezhuyan wrote:
Hi mikemcgarry, GMATNinjaTwo, GMATNinja, MagooshExpert Carolyn,
sayantanc2
VeritasPrepKarishma

anyone can elaborate A and D, although many discusses here, i am still confused.
as per A, Does A state that older is one explanation of the collapse. those buildings were older, according to a less exactly standard. So IMO, A weakens the conclusion.
As per D, I an mot absolutely understand "no stronger than", Does it mean weaker? or as strong as ...?
if the columns are as strong as the building-safety codes required for such a building, then i think D strengthen
if the columns are weaker than the building-safety codes required for such a building, then i think D weaken.

Please help...
hope this post won't be sunk into the sea of posts.

Have a nice day
>_~


Hi zoezhuyan,

Your point about (D) is the reason we cannot use it. Because we can say it both strengthens and weakens the argument given its parameters, we cannot say it helps our case. Therefore, it cannot be the answer. (D) says it could be as strong, but it could be weaker. If it is as strong, this doesn't help us. We NEED it to be weaker, otherwise we cannot strengthen our conclusion.
To diagram: No stronger than means <= strength of the original object

Does this help?
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Re: Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jul 2018, 05:52
nightblade354 wrote:
zoezhuyan wrote:
Hi mikemcgarry, GMATNinjaTwo, GMATNinja, MagooshExpert Carolyn,
sayantanc2
VeritasPrepKarishma

anyone can elaborate A and D, although many discusses here, i am still confused.
as per A, Does A state that older is one explanation of the collapse. those buildings were older, according to a less exactly standard. So IMO, A weakens the conclusion.
As per D, I an mot absolutely understand "no stronger than", Does it mean weaker? or as strong as ...?
if the columns are as strong as the building-safety codes required for such a building, then i think D strengthen
if the columns are weaker than the building-safety codes required for such a building, then i think D weaken.

Please help...
hope this post won't be sunk into the sea of posts.

Have a nice day
>_~


Hi zoezhuyan,

Your point about (D) is the reason we cannot use it. Because we can say it both strengthens and weakens the argument given its parameters, we cannot say it helps our case. Therefore, it cannot be the answer. (D) says it could be as strong, but it could be weaker. If it is as strong, this doesn't help us. We NEED it to be weaker, otherwise we cannot strengthen our conclusion.
To diagram: No stronger than means <= strength of the original object

Does this help?


Thanks so much nightblade354
Because we can say it both strengthens and weakens the argument given its parameters, we cannot say it helps our case. would you please elaborate further, what is "helps out case" ? it does not mean strengthen?
We NEED it to be weaker, otherwise we cannot strengthen our conclusion.
we need it to be weaker? do not we strengthen? why we need it to be weaker?

No stronger than means two senarios , "as strong as" and "weaker" , right?

Thanks in advance.

have a lovely day
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Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jul 2018, 06:10
zoezhuyan wrote:
nightblade354 wrote:
zoezhuyan wrote:
Hi mikemcgarry, GMATNinjaTwo, GMATNinja, MagooshExpert Carolyn,
sayantanc2
VeritasPrepKarishma

anyone can elaborate A and D, although many discusses here, i am still confused.
as per A, Does A state that older is one explanation of the collapse. those buildings were older, according to a less exactly standard. So IMO, A weakens the conclusion.
As per D, I an mot absolutely understand "no stronger than", Does it mean weaker? or as strong as ...?
if the columns are as strong as the building-safety codes required for such a building, then i think D strengthen
if the columns are weaker than the building-safety codes required for such a building, then i think D weaken.

Please help...
hope this post won't be sunk into the sea of posts.

Have a nice day
>_~


Hi zoezhuyan,

Your point about (D) is the reason we cannot use it. Because we can say it both strengthens and weakens the argument given its parameters, we cannot say it helps our case. Therefore, it cannot be the answer. (D) says it could be as strong, but it could be weaker. If it is as strong, this doesn't help us. We NEED it to be weaker, otherwise we cannot strengthen our conclusion.
To diagram: No stronger than means <= strength of the original object

Does this help?


Thanks so much nightblade354
Because we can say it both strengthens and weakens the argument given its parameters, we cannot say it helps our case. would you please elaborate further, what is "helps out case" ? it does not mean strengthen?
We NEED it to be weaker, otherwise we cannot strengthen our conclusion.
we need it to be weaker? do not we strengthen? why we need it to be weaker?

No stronger than means two senarios , "as strong as" and "weaker" , right?

Thanks in advance.

have a lovely day
>_~


No stronger means "as strong as" OR "weaker", so you are close on that. The argument says that we want to strengthen the conclusion that a weakness can cause destruction. Because we do not know if the option will fall on "as strong as" or "weaker", we cannot say for sure if this helps our conclusion.

Is this clearer?
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Re: Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jul 2018, 04:07
nightblade354 wrote:
No stronger means "as strong as" OR "weaker", so you are close on that. The argument says that we want to strengthen the conclusion that a weakness can cause destruction. Because we do not know if the option will fall on "as strong as" or "weaker", we cannot say for sure if this helps our conclusion.

Is this clearer?


Thanks nightblade354, Now i got it.

additional, do you think A states the collapsed building are older building, implying that the age is another explanaiton?
I am not suspect the office answer, i absoutely understand OA is awlays correct. I donlt understand what's wrong with my interpretation.

would you please point out ?

Thanks in advance
Have a nice day
>_~
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Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jul 2018, 06:07
1
zoezhuyan wrote:
nightblade354 wrote:
No stronger means "as strong as" OR "weaker", so you are close on that. The argument says that we want to strengthen the conclusion that a weakness can cause destruction. Because we do not know if the option will fall on "as strong as" or "weaker", we cannot say for sure if this helps our conclusion.

Is this clearer?


Thanks nightblade354, Now i got it.

additional, do you think A states the collapsed building are older building, implying that the age is another explanaiton?
I am not suspect the office answer, i absoutely understand OA is awlays correct. I donlt understand what's wrong with my interpretation.

would you please point out ?

Thanks in advance
Have a nice day
>_~


I think your issue is that you're not focusing on the conclusion. Here is the conclusion: "Clearly, this collapse exemplifies how even a single, apparently insignificant, departure from safety standards can have severe consequences". Given this, does age do anything to our argument? Nope. It weakens our argument, which isn't the goal. Our goal is to strengthen.

Does this help?

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Re: Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jul 2018, 11:34
nightblade354 wrote:
adkikani wrote:
GMATNinja VeritasPrepKarishma pikolo2510 nightblade354 generis

Can you please validate my PoE:

Quote:
A. The only other buildings whose roofs collapsed from the weight of the snowfall were older buildings constructed according to less exacting standards than those (ie buildings constructed) in the (earlier) safety codes.

I have added my interpretation and underlined words which according to me is a very strong language used by author to prove his point that
small deviations from safety standards can result in severe consequences ie building collapse.

Quote:
D. The columns of the building were no stronger than the building-safety codes required for such a building.



Buildings' columns (same level as) safety codes ??
Nope this is not what I need to strengthen the conclusion. I need to assign a higher priority level to safety codes
to strengthen this argument.


Hi adkikani,

Your reasoning is close with (D). The reason (D) doesn't work is because it says no stronger, but does mean that they are weaker? Nope. Therefore, we have no idea whether this violates the conclusion that a single diversion from safety standards can cause issues. They could be just as strong, and this would then defeat our conclusion.

Does this help?

Very nice work as usual, nightblade354!

adkikani, one quick correction to your analysis of choice (A):

Quote:
A. The only other buildings whose roofs collapsed from the weight of the snowfall were older buildings constructed according to less exacting standards than those in the safety codes.

Replacing those, we get: "The only other buildings whose roofs collapsed from the weight of the snowfall were older buildings constructed according to less exacting standards than the standards in the safety codes." So the older buildings were built to less exacting standards.

As described in this previous post, if (A) were not true, we'd have reason to doubt the author's argument.
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Re: Editorial: The roof of Northtown Council’s equipment-storage   [#permalink] 10 Jul 2018, 11:34
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