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Every element on the periodic chart is radioactive, though

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Every element on the periodic chart is radioactive, though  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jul 2012, 21:31
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Every element on the periodic chart is radioactive, though the most stable elements have half-lives that are thousands and thousands of years long. When an atom decays, it splits into two or more smaller atoms. Even considering the fusion taking place inside of stars, there is only a negligible tendency for smaller atoms to transmute into larger ones. Thus, the ratio of lighter to heavier atoms in the universe is increasing at a measurable rate. Therefore, __________________________.

Which of the following most logically completes the above statements?
1) it is possible to use a shifting ratio of light to heavy atoms to calculate the age of the universe.
2) the fusion taking place inside stars has to produce enough atoms of the heavy elements to offset the radioactive decay of large atoms elsewhere in the universe.
3) without radioactive decay of atoms, there could be no solar combustion and no life as we know it.
4) it is imperative that scientists begin developing ways to reverse the trend and restore the proper balance between the lighter and the heavier elements.
5) there are now more light elements in the universe than heavy ones.
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Re: Every element on the periodic chart is radioactive  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jul 2012, 23:21
1 is correct, The last statement indicates that the ratio is increasing and it is measurable. The initial statement gives background on atoms, decay rate & half life indicating various factors for determining age of universe.
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Re: Every element on the periodic chart is radioactive  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2012, 09:55
gjg wrote:
Every element on the periodic chart is radioactive, though the most stable elements have half-lives that are thousands and thousands of years long. When an atom decays, it splits into two or more smaller atoms. Even considering the fusion taking place inside of stars, there is only a negligible tendency for smaller atoms to transmute into larger ones. Thus, the ratio of lighter to heavier atoms in the universe is increasing at a measurable rate. Therefore, __________________________.

2) the fusion taking place inside stars has to produce enough atoms of the heavy elements to offset the radioactive decay of large atoms elsewhere in the universe.
3) without radioactive decay of atoms, there could be no solar combustion and no life as we know it.
4) it is imperative that scientists begin developing ways to reverse the trend and restore the proper balance between the lighter and the heavier elements.
5) there are now more light elements in the universe than heavy ones.


I liked this one because It took me quite long time to guest the meaning of the argument. However, my choice is the first one, choice (A). My reasoning is:
(A) it is possible to use a shifting ratio of light to heavy atoms to calculate the age of the universe. => the cause the ratio of lighter to heavier atom in the universe is increasing at a MEASURABLE RATE (this is the keyword for all of this argument) => We can measure the speed of decaying => can calculate the time
(B) HAS TO in this choice is very extreme. And the argument also did not mention the offset between various kind of elements
(C) SOLAR COMBUSTION is irrelevant to the argument
(D) IMPERATIVE is also a extreme word. So, out of scope
(E) This hypothesis that there are now more light elements in the universe than heavy ones is really non-provable because there is no clue in the argument.
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Re: Every element on the periodic chart is radioactive  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2012, 11:37
Dont understand why cant E be the answer!

what is the OA and OE?
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Re: Every element on the periodic chart is radioactive  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2012, 21:58
My Answer is A.
1) it is possible to use a shifting ratio of light to heavy atoms to calculate the age of the universe.

Whats OA?
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Re: Every element on the periodic chart is radioactive  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2012, 00:06
jaiswalamrita wrote:
Dont understand why cant E be the answer!

what is the OA and OE?



For E to be the conclusion, the proportion of lighter to higher needs to be discussed. which is not the case.
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Re: Every element on the periodic chart is radioactive, though  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2012, 19:40
Every element on the periodic chart is radioactive, though the most stable elements have half-lives that are thousands and thousands of years long. When an atom decays, it splits into two or more smaller atoms. Even considering the fusion taking place inside of stars, there is only a negligible tendency for smaller atoms to transmute into larger ones. Thus, the ratio of lighter to heavier atoms in the universe is increasing at a measurable rate. Therefore, __________________________.

Which of the following most logically completes the above statements?

2) the fusion taking place inside stars has to produce enough atoms of the heavy elements to offset the radioactive decay of large atoms elsewhere in the universe.

Went with 2. Can someone give an explanation. I though the negligible tendency for smaller atoms to transmute into larger ones paralleled 2.
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Re: Every element on the periodic chart is radioactive, though  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Aug 2012, 00:50
Except B & E , other options are just far away from the ans.
I was eliminated E because it says " there are now more light elements in the universe than heavy ones." .It might be true , But we dont know the current conditions ...so it seems difficult to conclude .....
So ,I would go with B
BTW what is the OA ????
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Re: Every element on the periodic chart is radioactive, though  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Aug 2012, 03:03
grbjha wrote:
Except B & E , other options are just far away from the ans.
I was eliminated E because it says " there are now more light elements in the universe than heavy ones." .It might be true , But we dont know the current conditions ...so it seems difficult to conclude .....
So ,I would go with B
BTW what is the OA ????


Per me the answer is A. Ruling B out as there is no mention in the passage about requirement to offset the increase in ratio of lighter atoms. On the otherhand Passage does mention that Shift towards lighter atoms is mesureable hence A makes a better choice.
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Re: Every element on the periodic chart is radioactive, though  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Aug 2012, 21:09
Answer choice is A.

B makes a normative statement that is not supported by the stimulus. Nowhere does it say that fusion within stars NEEDS to offset radioactive decay elsewhere.

E is NOT the answer because the question stimulus says that the RATIO of light to heavy atoms is increasing at a measurable rate. However, that tells us nothing about the ABSOLUTE number of light atoms in the universe vs. heavy. For instance, let's say that a million years ago there was 1 billion light atoms and 10 billion heavy atoms, for a ratio of 1:10. Now, there is 5 billion light atoms and 6 billion heavy atoms, for a ratio of 5:6. The ratio has certainly increased a lot, but there is still more heavy atoms. So we cannot conclude based on the information given that E holds true. This is the classic ratio vs raw number trick that the GMAT loves to pull.

A is correct because it makes the correct conclusion based on the information given. If the ratio of light to heavy atoms is increasing at MEASURABLE (key word for this question) rate, then we can mathematically figure out the age of the universe since this fusion process has been going on since the beginning of the universe.
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Re: Every element on the periodic chart is radioactive, though  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Aug 2012, 23:57
I'l go with A.

The choice gives relation between 2 premises - half lives and ratios of lighter to heavier atoms.
Knowing these 2 and we can calculate the speed with which the division of an heavier atom to lighter atom is going on, and thus the life of universe when compared with the actual life of undivided atom, can be calculated.

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Re: Every element on the periodic chart is radioactive, though  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Aug 2012, 02:32
My answer is A

keywords are "increasing at a measurable rate"

so, increasing rate = shifting ratio can be used to determine the age of the universe
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Re: Every element on the periodic chart is radioactive, though  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Aug 2012, 09:20
OA is A

every-element-on-the-periodic-chart-is-radioactive-although-74688.html
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Re: Every element on the periodic chart is radioactive, though  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Aug 2012, 11:15
good question ..
i missed it
but now i understand how it works ..whenever we digress from the conclusion the chances of missing the question are very high
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Re: Every element on the periodic chart is radioactive, though  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Aug 2012, 12:12
mohan514 wrote:
good question ..
i missed it
but now i understand how it works ..whenever we digress from the conclusion the chances of missing the question are very high


Even though I do not like LSAT question because they do not resemble real GMAT questions, I like this one.

In complete the argument whenever you see SINCE or BECAUSE at the end of the stimulus is a strenghtening or assumption question, but in other cases you have to weakening or find the paradox or conclusion.......in sum, you have to rely on the context of the same and then evaluate your response accordingly.

2) the fusion taking place inside stars has to produce enough atoms of the heavy elements to offset the radioactive decay of large atoms elsewhere in the universe. here is not the point

3) without radioactive decay of atoms, there could be no solar combustion and no life as we know it. once againg, here is not the point at end

4) it is imperative that scientists begin developing ways to reverse the trend and restore the proper balance between the lighter and the heavier elements. too extreme and also wrong because we are not concerned to reverse any trend

5) there are now more light elements in the universe than heavy ones. we can't infer this because we are talking about of ratio

1) it is possible to use a shifting ratio of light to heavy atoms to calculate the age of the universe. looking at the stimulus we have "Every element on the periodic chart is radioactive, though the most stable elements have half-lives that are thousands and thousands of years long" and "the ratio of lighter to heavier atoms in the universe is increasing at a measurable rate."......so a shifting

;)
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Re: Every element on the periodic chart is radioactive, though  [#permalink]

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Re: Every element on the periodic chart is radioactive, though   [#permalink] 09 Jan 2019, 19:55
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