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UNC Kenan-Flagler MBA Admissions and Related blogs

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A “fit” schedule [#permalink]

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New post 09 Feb 2018, 13:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: A “fit” schedule
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Some people enjoy watching TV or going out with friends when they want to relax or unwind from a long day at work or school. For Michelle Corriveau (MAC ’17) neither would suffice.

Her form of relaxation is going to the gym.

Corriveau, a tax accountant for PwC, is a weightlifter competing at the national level.

She decided to go back to school to pursue a degree through the Master of Accounting Program at UNC Kenan-Flagler because she wanted to increase her options.

“There wasn’t room for mobility for me at my previous job,” says Corriveau.

She credits weightlifting for her drive to be more successful professionally. Corriveau discovered her passion for weightlifting through CrossFit, a fitness regime, in April 2015.

“Everyone I’ve met through the sport is extremely hardworking and passionate,” she says. “It makes me want to be the same way.”

While enrolled in the MAC Program, Corriveau spent two to three hours a day training in the gym and then went right back to studying in the library.

She balanced her school life with her weightlifting training by keeping a tight schedule and developing discipline.

“My downtime was spent training so it was easier to balance my version of a break from school,” says Corriveau.

At the gym Corriveau works on improving her strength so she can qualify for weightlifting meets. So far she has competed in local meets and one meet on the national level at the 2016 National University Championships.

“It takes a lot to qualify for a national meet and once you’re there it’s really a do or die moment because you don’t know when you’ll get to do it again,” says Corriveau. “It takes a pretty big toll mentally.”

Weightlifting has taught her some valuable life lessons, she says. “There’s nothing I can’t get through if I put my mind to it and put the time and effort in,” she said.

 

By Shawna McIntosh (BA ’19)

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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Preconceived notions [#permalink]

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New post 12 Feb 2018, 12:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Preconceived notions
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Before I arrived at UNC, whenever someone asked me what I wanted to study, I always answered “journalism” followed by “I’m not good with numbers.” Math and science were my weakest subjects throughout high school and I was ready to study something in college that involved more writing and creativity.

Coming to college, I assumed business fell into the same category as math and science. Accounting, economics and finance sounded numbers-oriented and tough. So when I started my first year at UNC and it seemed as if every single freshman was saying they were “pre-business,” I was a little shocked. Wasn’t the business major extremely competitive and challenging?

For me, applying to UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School was out of the question, and so was taking any sort of business class. However, as I got deeper into my advertising major, I noticed there was more of a connection between journalism and business than I had thought. My advertising classes compared advertising with marketing, and I took a business journalism class that offered insight as to how the journalism and business worlds affected each other. By second semester of sophomore year, I had a new-found interest for business.

When I heard about UNC Business Essentials (UBE), the curriculum seemed like the perfect fit. Targeted towards non-business majors, UBE offered me the chance to learn from UNC Kenan-Flagler professors without ever having to actually apply and be accepted into the Undergraduate Business Program. It provided me with the opportunity to learn valuable business skills that would give me the upper hand in school, job interviews and life, in general.

I also chose UBE for its simpler, online format. The ability to take the course whenever and wherever I wanted was ideal. And, while I knew numbers would be involved, I also knew the program was targeted towards students like me who just wanted to learn the basics of business subjects. And the marketing module especially interested me as an advertising major.

Having completed the program, I now understand that business isn’t just equations and formulas, rather it involves creative aspects like building a brand and reaching target audiences through marketing tactics.

I entered college with no intentions of taking a business course due to my preconceived notions about the subject. However, UBE provided me with both new business knowledge and a changed perspective on what business is all about.

By Claire Hart (BA ’19)

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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Changing our world: The Campaign for Carolina [#permalink]

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New post 12 Feb 2018, 16:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Changing our world: The Campaign for Carolina
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The University is four months into the Campaign for Carolina, and UNC Kenan-Flagler is making excellent progress toward its goal of raising $400 million by the end of 2022.

Gifts of all sizes are already making an impact. To date, the School has raised just over $129 million toward the goal, thanks to the generosity of more than 12,300 donors.

Commitments from these UNC Kenan-Flagler alumni deserve a special mention:

  • John Townsend (BA ’77, MBA ’82) and Marree (BA ’77) Townsend made a $50 million commitment to UNC to support business, arts, humanities and athletics.
  • Steve Vetter (BSBA ’78) and Debbie Vetter (ABED ’78) made a $40 million commitment to support business, the Red, White & Blue Challenge and athletics.
UNC Kenan-Flagler’s five major Campaign funding priorities are:

  • Innovative directions – Expanding interactive, personalized experiential learning for all students and pursue our mission in new ways, such as the Business of Health Care Initiative
  • Leadership – Providing funding for more fellowships, scholarships and faculty support
  • Centers of excellence – Supporting the vital work of our Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise and our Leonard W. Wood Center for Real Estate Studies, Center for Sustainable Enterprise, Center for Entrepreneurial Studies, Family Enterprise Center, Energy Center, Global Business Center as well as other centers
  • Facilities – Funding a new building and upgrades to all of our facilities
  • Annual Fund – Supporting the Fund for UNC Kenan-Flagler, our critical base annual support
One way you can support UNC Kenan-Flagler and the Campaign is to make a gift on Feb. 27 during our annual Giving Day, when we go head to head in a points-based challenge against Duke’s Fuqua School of Business in the BlueVBlue Challenge. Help us retain our title from last year and, again, BEAT DUKE!

Learn more about how to support UNC Kenan-Flagler and the Campaign for Carolina, and make a gift now.

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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UNC real estate students take on Texas [#permalink]

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New post 22 Feb 2018, 15:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: UNC real estate students take on Texas
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Every year the National Real Estate Challenge, hosted by The University of Texas at Austin, is a rewarding opportunity for select UNC Kenan-Flagler second-year MBA students who are concentrating in real estate. A group of our faculty and staff select the team based on a qualification paper and case competition.

This year, the committee selected Mehegan Easley, Tip O’Donnell, Zach Spencer, Kevin Wade, Shelton Whitley and me to represent UNC.

We had an initial team meeting to outline anticipated workflow and overall expectations. We each performed research and preparation separately in the weeks prior to the competition. Once the case was distributed, we had 72 hours to turnaround a final product. We received the case on Thursday, Nov. 9 and the clock began.

For the case, each team needed to make a recommendation on a closed-end debt fund that held an underwater mezzanine loan on a power center. The recommendation centered around whether to accept or counter a revised term sheet from the property owner and senior debt holder.

After reviewing the case and debriefing the situation, we decided that the power center was a strong asset with short-term liquidity issues, and the proposed term sheet created a risk and reward imbalance. To build our case, we examined the overall retail market while drilling down into subsectors and each tenant’s health. We reviewed the motivations for all parties in the deal and ran in-depth financial analysis to understand potential outcomes of various scenarios and deal options. Finally, we created an innovative counter proposal to remedy the situation, properly reward each party, and remain in line with the debt fund’s strategy.

After submitting our final product on Sunday night, we divided up talking points and turned our attention toward selling our story. We had a few days in Chapel Hill to practice before heading to Austin on Wednesday, Nov.15.

UT was a gracious host and threw a fantastic welcome party for Challenge participants. We enjoyed getting to know the other participants before the competition, but stayed focused on preparing to deliver a flawless presentation. The next day, our presentation went off without a hitch and we walked out of the room extremely satisfied with our presentation.

The competition was fierce and, unfortunately, the judges did not select us to move forward towards the finals. We remained proud of our work and our pride solidified after several judges approached us to commend us for our innovative thinking and creativity. We watched the remaining presentations, which was a great opportunity to learn from our peers and see a variety of proposals. To cap off the trip, we enjoyed a team dinner to celebrate our hard work, the unique idea we cultivated, and an overall, great experience.

While we did not bring home a trophy, I really enjoyed working on a debt financing case and tackling a real-world problem with my peers. Everyone on the team learned a lot and our innovative approach to the case left a lasting impression to take forward in our professional lives. We are all proud to have represented UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School at the National Real Estate Challenge, and I know it will go down as one of my favorite MBA experiences.

 By Braedon Crosby (MBA ’18)

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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Finding a career I am passionate about [#permalink]

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New post 23 Feb 2018, 09:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Finding a career I am passionate about
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UNC Business Essentials has shaped my career goals by helping me narrow down what exactly I am interested in doing after I graduate – a daunting decision for any college student.

I’ve always known that I would be interested in a career in a business-related field, but prior to UBE I wasn’t quite sure the scope of business and the different types of careers that you could hold in it.

Through UBE I discovered specific aspects of business that interest me. I realized that I love operations, but not so much accounting. I am interested in marketing, but not finance.

Having this opportunity to discover what interests me, before I enter the job market, has been incredibly beneficial in helping me find a career that I will be passionate about. I also realized that I can apply my other interests to a career in business.

The UBE program provides real-world examples of business across various industries and applications. No matter what your future career goals might be, this certificate program provides valuable skills that will benefit you in any field or position.

I now have a clearer image of what my future career could hold and I know that this certificate will not only make me stand out to employers, but also set me up for success. The skills I formed through this certificate program have not only shaped my future career plans, but provided me with the skills necessary to achieve them.

By Ally Daws

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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Leading the way in innovative mentorship [#permalink]

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New post 26 Feb 2018, 12:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Leading the way in innovative mentorship
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Innovation is on the curriculum at UNC. And with the Adams Apprenticeship, Carolina’s highest potential student leaders are receiving entrepreneurship mentoring and connections to a powerful network.

Designed to accelerate the entrepreneurial careers of some of UNC’s top students, the Adams Apprenticeship, a program of the UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School’s Center for Entrepreneurial Studies, enrolls undergraduate juniors and first-year graduate students from across the University for a 12-month program. The comprehensive program results in a life-long network of students and successful UNC alumni and friends – comprised of 280 leaders in 2018 —that shapes, supports and speeds the transition to entrepreneurial careers with successful outcomes.

Mary Margaret Milley (MBA ’19)—a member of the 2018 Adams Apprentice cohort—has launched Viyb, a company designed to make finding mental health care more accessible. UNC’s focus on entrepreneurship is one of the reasons she chose UNC Kenan-Flagler for graduate school.

“The network the Adams Apprenticeship offers is unique,” says Milley. “I am really impressed with everyone’s commitment to making Chapel Hill a ground zero for entrepreneurs to grow. The mentors are a network of people really committed to upholding Tar Heel culture and helping students succeed,” she says.

Being exposed to students from other departments and with completely different backgrounds has already benefited her company. “Culturally, this is a very tight knit group,” she says. “This is going to be very useful going forward and in exploring entrepreneurship long term.”

The Adams Apprenticeship provides curricular and co-curricular leadership development training and the opportunity to travel to New York and San Francisco to learn about these key markets and further build the students’ networks. Apprentices attend two daylong conferences at UNC which feature inspiring talks and networking opportunities. In addition, students receive access to and mentorship from UNC’s most successful entrepreneurs.

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That mentorship has been life changing for Alexandra Hehlen, who during her sophomore year at UNC founded “Coulture,” a fashion magazine that features diverse global perspectives and models of all sizes, shapes, gender identities, and races. A member of the Adams Apprenticeship 2017 cohort, Hehlen plans to work in New York City as an art director or creative director in the fashion industry after receiving her bachelor’s degree from UNC in May 2018.

One of her mentors is Dana McMahan, a professor in the UNC School of Media and Journalism professor). “She is my wonder woman, “says Hehlen.”Last year, she started helping me figure out what I wanted to do and saw something in me I didn’t see in myself yet.”

McMahan suggested that Hehlen think about art direction and made a connection for her with an agency in New York. Hehlen interned there last summer, working on campaigns for brands including Ralph Lauren and Tom Ford. “I never would have figured out this career direction without her,” says Hehlen.

One of her favorite parts of the Adams Apprenticeship is the people. “The board of advisors I have been fortunate to cultivate has helped me through bumps in the road, both with my venture and my future,” she says. “My fellow classmates and cohort have been essential in my time here at UNC; getting to spend time with people who are like-minded and similarly driven to change the world through entrepreneurship is such a blessing.” She expresses her appreciation for the passion of the Adams staff. “They treat the program as a startup and I value that an entrepreneurial focus permeates the entire organization,” she says.

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Edgar Walker (BA ’16), a member of the 2016 Adams Apprenticeship, works on the analytics team for Bleacher Report in San Francisco. “The lessons I learned during the apprenticeship are very relevant and affect how I work day-to-day,” he says.

“What’s important is that this is one of the few programs invested in the students themselves rather than the outcome they can create,” says Walker. “That ladders up to the lofty and ambitious vision to create a world-class mentorship program, which it is well on its way to doing.”

Walker describes the Adams Apprenticeship as a lifelong program. “I’m involved in meeting with students as a recent grad who can be a bit of an advisor,” he says. “I’m looking forward to giving back and excited to see how this program continues to support me, my peers and future students and see the impact we make and the people we can lead moving forward.”

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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Nairobi Dreams [#permalink]

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New post 08 Mar 2018, 14:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Nairobi Dreams
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Entrepreneurs wait for the start of the World Bank Agritech Challenge info session. The accelerator had 230+ applicants for three spots and an opportunity to co-create with East Africa’s largest agribusiness.

Expecting eyes glared at me from inside the conference room as I entered through the glass door and fidgeted with my clammy hands. I allowed my eyes to meet theirs before speaking out words with the power of shattering dreams.

“I’m sorry, but you’re just not what we’re looking for right now. You have a great idea so please consider applying next year.”

I knew they weren’t going to. This was the end of the road for their startup, and I was the executioner. The two co-founders left the office and re-entered the world of 40+ percent unemployment and the highest youth unemployment rate in East Africa.

I had the joy and challenge of working in Nairobi, Kenya, with a Hong Kong-based VC firm and corporate innovation accelerator called Nest. We were contracted by the World Bank to run the first open innovation agritech accelerator in East Africa, which seemed like a lottery jackpot to startup applicants in a world where side hustles (i.e. upselling fidget spinners) are what constitutes a “Series A.”

During my two months going through all the steps of building an accelerator, the most notable experience came in speaking with and selecting the startups.

Hearing people passionately share what they view as their life’s work gives you a certain sense of responsibility. It’s inspiring, gut-wrenching and tense. The truth is, not every startup idea is great. There aren’t unlimited funds for people to pursue moonshots and personal projects, and sometimes you have to be the one shutting doors. Although I learned a tremendous amount during my summer working in Nairobi, I am becoming more aware of my failures each day.

Through the UNC Kenan-Flagler Center for Entrepreneurial Studies Entrepreneurs Lab we met Alec Guettel, a serial entrepreneur and founder of Sungevity, Axiom Law and Imprint. Guettel’s path is anything but conventional – first circling through the government bureaucracy as a special assistant in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and then diving into environmental entrepreneurship.

I learned about failure from Guettel. With the folding of his latest startup, Sungevity, once hyped as a potential unicorn, he saw his passion crushed by investor unrest following the 2016 presidential election. He shared his story in our class in an accepting way, focusing more on key learnings and potential improvements he could have made rather than complaints about the situation.

Most importantly, Guettel spoke about the work that he now does with startups as an advisor and mentor. He works as a nurturer and connector. As someone who listens to challenges and does everything in his power to provide a solution. He has transitioned from an operator into an educator, pushing those he meets to improve and build better companies.

And this is where I realized my mistake.

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Senior Sami Lachgar in the Metta co-working space in Nairobi. Metta is a subdivision of Nest and is one of East Africa’s largest co-working spaces and network.

Letting inspired youth walk out a door empty-handed in a country where nothing is taken for granted shouldn’t be an option. As somebody with a formal entrepreneurial education, it should’ve been my job to not only evaluate a startup and tell someone their ideas weren’t good enough, but also speak with them about why that was the case. I should have taken an additional 5 minutes with each startup, listened to their problems and attempted to provide an alternative way forward for them.

Guettel taught me that feedback is a crucial educational component in the real world, and I can’t wait to incorporate that lessons in future work focusing on entrepreneurship in developing countries.

 

By Sami Lachgar (BSBA 18’)

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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Innovation in the U.S. Army and at Carolina [#permalink]

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New post 08 Mar 2018, 14:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Innovation in the U.S. Army and at Carolina
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General Mark A. Milley is constantly seeking out innovation. “I’m the head of an organization that was founded on the 14th of June in 1775,” said Milley, Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army, during a visit to Launch Chapel Hill. “We have been around a while but have changed a lot over the years. If you don’t adapt quickly, your organization becomes irrelevant.”

Milley is inspired by the work of entrepreneurs, such as those served by Launch Chapel Hill and the UNC Kenan-Flagler Center for Entrepreneurial Studies.

“The Army is a big organization – 1.2 million soldiers, serving in 140 countries around the world – providing a product called the safety and security of the American people,” he says. “In order to provide that, we have to adapt to the changing operational environment and remain on the cutting edge. You do that by getting exposure to innovators.”

“I seek out areas of innovation around the country, in places like the Triangle, Silicon Valley and Route 128 (in Massachusetts),” he says.

Reflecting on a meeting with Elon Musk, founder and CEO of SpaceX and co-founder and CEO of Tesla, he says, “I wanted to engage him and get his thinking on emerging technology, artificial intelligence and electric ways of powering vehicles which I think will have utility in the military domain. Musk has a brilliant mind and looks at the world differently than I might. He says that in order to succeed, you have to have a high threshold for pain and failure.”

Milley notes that Musk has gone bankrupt three times.

“We have to get over the idea that failure is bad,” says Milley. “Most successful business people have failed many, many times.” He encourages entrepreneurs to “dream big and go for it; don’t take no for an answer. To be successful, you need to try things, fail and then pick yourself up by your bootstraps and try again.”

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Talking with student members of UNC Kenan-Flagler’s Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital (E

VC) Club, Milley advises that all organizations have both formal and informal leaders. “You have to be familiar with both,” he says. “Informal leaders can be quite effective in making things happen and getting results while formal leaders have rank and power to make things happen. Be sure to work both channels.”

He encourages speculative critical thinking skills. “Don’t accept things at face value; always ask why,” says Milley. “If human beings never asked why, we wouldn’t have advanced past the Stone Age. And have an inquisitive mind; be broad ranging in your lines of inquiry.”

Milley believes that communication is key to success. “The handmaiden of transparency is to be candid,” he says. “You may be wrong but you should at least tell the truth the way you see it.”

Matt Dallhoff (MBA ’18), EVC president, is inspired by Milley’s leadership and vision. “He has put such an emphasis on innovation and looking at the future of the army,” says Dallhoff. “To hear how General Milley employs innovation in an organization as large as the Army is uniquely valuable for our club members looking to launch a venture or join a growing startup.”

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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BlueVBlue redux [#permalink]

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New post 09 Mar 2018, 16:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: BlueVBlue redux
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UNC Kenan-Flagler raised $532,237 and set a new record for donors in one day on its way to beating Duke’s Fuqua School of Business 1,579 to 980 in the second BlueVBlue Giving Day Challenge between the two business schools.

“I like raising funds to support our school, and I love beating Duke,” said Doug Shackelford (BSBA ’80), dean and Meade H. Willis Distinguished Professor of Taxation. “It’s great when we can do both of those things at the same time – this event has been a tremendous addition to our School.”

UNC Kenan-Flagler led from the start of the day thanks to a strong push both on campus and from alumni across the globe. Gifts came in from 15 different countries and 38 states, with North Carolina, Georgia, New York, Virginia, and California leading the way in donor participation.

This year’s Challenge on Feb 27 featured some new elements including live donor heat maps (US and World), a Starting 5 volunteer challenge, numerous regional happy hour events, and video cameos by Luke Maye (BSBA ’19), Antawn Jamison and Business School alumni parent Roy Williams.

More than 200 UNC Kenan-Flagler students – representing all degree programs – participated in BlueVBlue with a gift, as did over 150 faculty and staff, and 81 parents of current students. MBA alumni lead the way in BlueVBlue participation with 595 donors, followed by Undergraduate Business alumni with 326, and MAC alumni with 39.

“One of the greatest things about the BlueVBlue Challenge is the level of excitement and participation it generates across all members of the UNC Kenan-Flagler community – alumni, students, faculty, staff, parents and friends,” said Jeremy Allen, senior director of annual support and advancement communications at UNC Kenan-Flagler. “Everyone gives at a level they are comfortable with, and together we generate incredible support for the Business School and its students.”

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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Innovative fund seeks new donors [#permalink]

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New post 12 Mar 2018, 06:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Innovative fund seeks new donors
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Jeff Tucker with Rollie Tillman

Jeff Tucker (MBA ’00) has a plan to help UNC Kenan-Flagler meet its aggressive goal to raise $400 million for the Campaign for Carolina. The name of that plan is The Rollie Tillman Jr. Development Fund.

Tucker created the fund and seeded it with initial capital, with the idea of attracting additional donations over the coming years. Named in honor of Dr. Rollie Tillman Jr. (BSBA ’55) to benefit UNC Kenan-Flagler’s fundraising efforts and better serve the School in meeting future challenges, it is the first of its kind at Carolina.  Specifically, the fund helps the School attract and retain fundraising professionals so that it can continue to provide an excellent education to business students and also propel UNC Kenan-Flagler even farther.

“To compensate for the decline in state funding and meet campaign goals, additional development officers must be hired,” says Tucker. – “Based on internal studies, we know that there is a significant return on investment (ROI) from hiring additional development officers,” says Tucker. “We estimate that the ROI for a new development officer after 18 months on the job is over 100 percent, meaning they generate significantly more in donations than the costs associated with their salary and travel expenses.”

Tucker is managing director and chief operating officer of Century Bridge Capital, a private equity firm based in Beijing and Dallas focused on investments in China. At UNC Kenan-Flagler, he serves as chair of the development committee for the School’s Board of Advisors and formerly served as chair of the Alumni Council and as a member of the International Board of Advisors. He also serves on the Chancellor’s Global Leadership Taskforce.

Within the next three to five years, Tucker hopes to see the Tillman fund reach $10 million in principal value, enabling the School to significantly increase the number of development officers on staff.

Tucker named the fund for Professor Tillman, who has been deeply committed to UNC since he was an undergraduate student. From 1957 until his retirement in 2003, Tillman served UNC in a number of influential roles, including general college advisor, director of the full-time MBA Program and founding director of the Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise.

In his role as vice chancellor for university relations, the fundraising arm of the University, Tillman’s innovations were responsible for a major increase in University contributions. In that same innovative spirit, the fund created by Tucker also will help create major growth in contributions.

“Above all else, Professor Tillman has been an inspiration to thousands of UNC Kenan-Flagler students,” says Tucker. “I’m one of his incredibly grateful former students who has benefitted immensely from his guidance, wisdom and good humor over the years, so it gives me great pleasure to name this fund in his honor.”

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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Significant advantages academically, socially and professionally [#permalink]

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New post 12 Mar 2018, 06:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Significant advantages academically, socially and professionally
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Upon completing my online business certificate with UNC Business Essentials, I have used the practical and interpersonal skills that the program teaches on numerous occasions. From a classroom in Athens, Greece, to an internship in New York City, I have put my new understanding of business into practice through a variety of means.       

 This past summer, I interned at WNYC Studios, the podcasting branch of New York Public Radio. Working in the digital marketing department, my daily responsibilities included conducting market – or listener – research, producing promotional content, and measuring the intended effects of outreach strategies.

Having just completed the marketing and business distribution modules of UNC Business Essentials, I was able to jump right into these high-level tasks. My understanding of market research, distribution models and supply chains proved invaluable throughout the summer. Because of the knowledge I learned in UNC Business Essentials, I was not merely editing video, creating graphics and writing copy. Instead, I was acting with purpose, analyzing consumer insights and moving forward with proven strategies to increase engagement and return on investment.

UNC Business Essentials helped shape me into an efficient and effective intern at WNYC and, as a result, my colleagues viewed me as a reliable and competent team member. These professional relationships quickly transitioned into personal friendships. Now, out of the work environment and back to my education, these bonds have added yet another dimension to my career trajectory. As I begin the search for internships for this upcoming summer, I do not hesitate to provide my previous colleagues at WNYC as references in any and all applications.

On a micro-level, UNC Business Essentials has proven just as effective. Currently studying abroad in Athens, I am taking a Greek politics class that discusses the role of the European Union in the country’s current financial crisis. While this subject matter is well outside of my field of study, UNC Business Essential’s economics module has imparted me with the background needed in order to participate in and understand in-depth debates around such issues. In short, UBE has provided me an entry point –a thorough baseline knowledge – to engage in conversations around economics, finance and business.

UNC Business Essentials is not just an online business course – it is not a certificate that merely serves as a line on a resume. It teaches practical and relevant concepts and skills that give students significant advantages academically, socially and professionally. I am proud to say that I use and rely on that invaluable knowledge nearly every day and will certainly continue to do so in the years to come.    

By Colby Kirkpatrick (BA ‘19)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  

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Remembering Brettia Egerton (BSBA ’88) [#permalink]

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New post 13 Mar 2018, 20:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Remembering Brettia Egerton (BSBA ’88)
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Known for her tremendous work ethic and spirit of commitment, Brettia Arphine Egerton (BSBA ’88), 51, died on Feb. 17, 2018.

Egerton served on the Alumni Council at UNC Kenan-Flagler with Brian McBroom (BSBA ’88). They met their freshman year at Carolina.

“She was a wonderful person, and you could tell that she was a force to be reckoned with due to her strong study habits,” says McBroom. “This served her well prior to business school, but especially after we were admitted. This was quite an accomplishment considering that there were so few African-Americans in the School at the time. Not only would Brettia do the assigned problems, but also the rest of the problems in the chapter. Sometimes she would get other books to work on additional problems.”

Born on Nov. 10, 1966, in Durham, N.C., Egerton was the youngest of two children and received her early education in the Durham County Public School System. She was a proud graduate of the Hillside High School Class of 1984, where she was a member of both the marching and symphonic bands and several scholastic honor societies, graduating third in her class. After graduating from Carolina, she went on to earn her MBA from Clark Atlanta University in 2001.

Egerton was an advocate for change. She assisted in the formation of the Black Business Student Alliance at UNC – a group of African-Americans supporting one another once they were admitted into the Business School – and served as an officer.

After graduation, she secured Certified Internal Auditor and Certified Fraud Examiner designations and worked for the Florida Department of Revenue before joining AT&T as a senior audit manager. She audited business processes across multiple disciplines within the company.

As an active member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., Egerton mentored local high school girls and raised funds for scholarships and charities, including the American Cancer Society. She also served as an Aspire Academy online mentor to high school students on the west coast and as the director of community affairs for the National Association of Black Accountants-Atlanta Chapter.

Years later after graduating from Carolina, Egerton and McBroom became reacquainted in Atlanta. “Brettia was still that wonderful friend from college,” says McBroom. “She made sure to get me involved in various local organizations. She was especially fond of UNC Kenan-Flagler’s local alumni chapter where she sat on the planning committee. She encouraged me to attend the meetings.”

Pete Canalichio (MBA ’90) met Egerton while serving as president of the Atlanta alumni chapter.

“After I requested volunteers at a breakfast in 2015, Brettia came up and introduced herself,” says Canalichio. “She had a big, warm smile and a willing desire to ‘help in any way I can.’ She assisted with the marketing and execution of our alumni events. She also supported our Junior Achievement efforts to improve financial acumen for the youth in Atlanta. In each instance, Brettia brought a willingness to roll up her sleeves and that big, warm smile. This is the spirit of commitment Brettia always brought with her. She was one of the truly special people who has come into my life, and I will miss her dearly.”

Egerton, Canalichio and McBroom served together on UNC Kenan Flagler’s Alumni Council. “Brettia was so proud of her university, especially the Business School,” says McBroom. “She was a force of nature and a wonderful friend who will truly be missed.”

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Tom Byers to tackle the ethics of entrepreneurship as part of Keohane  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2018, 17:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Tom Byers to tackle the ethics of entrepreneurship as part of Keohane Professorship
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While Duke and UNC are fierce rivals on the basketball court, UNC’s Ted Zoller and Duke’s Kip Frey are working hand-in-hand to ensure that both schools are leaders in entrepreneurship and innovation.

Zoller, director of the UNC Kenan-Flagler Center for Entrepreneurial Studies, and Frey, interim director of the Duke Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative, are sponsoring residencies for four thought leaders in entrepreneurship. These renowned innovators from around the U.S are sharing their insights and experience with faculty and students at UNC and Duke.

The residencies are supported by a grant from the Keohane Distinguished Visiting Professorship, created by former UNC Chancellor James Moeser in honor of former Duke president Nannerl Keohane’s efforts to bridge the two universities. Entrepreneurship is one of the areas of focus for this year’s professorship.

“We are committed to staying on the cutting edge of what’s happening in pedagogy, research and theory in entrepreneurship,” says Zoller, T.W. Lewis Clinical Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship. “As one of the best programs in entrepreneurship with our ‘Learn, Launch, Lead’ model, we will benefit from having thought leaders of this character on campus and learn from them as we make our curriculum and programs distinctive in a global manner.”

The recipients of the professorship and their area of focus during their residency are:

  • Bill Aulet, managing director of the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship: disciplined entrepreneurship
  • Tom Byers, faculty director, Stanford Technology Ventures Program: technology commercialization and ethics
  • Jim Clifton, chairman and CEO, Gallup: leadership
  • Rebecca White, director of the Entrepreneurship Center at The University of Tampa: competency-based education
While on the two campuses, each thought leader engages with faculty and students, gives a plenary address, and works with Zoller and Frey to raise the bar for their programs’ quality.

“All of them are leaders in frontier areas for our program,” says Zoller. “By helping us benchmark national best practices in their areas of expertise, they will boost our gravitational pull and reach the next orbit. And working hand-in-hand with Duke, we can help build an even higher performing entrepreneurial ecosystem.”

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Byers has been an important global leader for more than 20 years in the Stanford Technology Ventures Program, which has helped connect the innovation community with the entrepreneurship community, says Zoller. “He has been involved in a very central way with the development of the Silicon Valley ecosystem.”

After a successful career in Silicon Valley, including as a key leader at Symantec Corporation during its formation, Byers joined Stanford’s faculty in 1995. “I have enjoyed being part of a growing community of academics who identify with the discipline of innovation and entrepreneurship,” says Byers. “This field used to be just war stories but now it’s an evidence-based management science that’s a true accepted discipline.”

Now that innovation and entrepreneurship have arrived as a discipline, Byers is looking toward the future. “Anybody can learn innovation and entrepreneurship,” he says. “It’s time to take a fresh look at our overall purpose. What can be our next step toward ascending our own top of Everest?”

A mission of his center at Stanford is to help other colleges. “In the spirit of a rising tide raises all boats, we want to be part of that rising tide,” he says. “We’ve always been connected with lots of institutions around the world. Duke and UNC in particular are of interest since they are peer institutions with Stanford. I have as much to learn here as to share.”

Sharing effective practices among Duke, UNC and Stanford in teaching innovation and entrepreneurship is one of the areas of focus for Byers. He is also tackling ethics, one of the most pressing issues facing Silicon Valley.

Highly visible ethics breaches in high profile companies blare from the headlines. Just two examples: Uber’s issues included price gouging, sexual harassment and the behavior of its former CEO, while Elizabeth Holmes, founder and chief executive of the blood-testing company Theranos, has been charged with fraud by the Securities and Exchange Commission.

“The relationship of ethics as a discipline to innovation and entrepreneurship education is something we need to take a good look at,” he says.

“Ethical lapses are disappointing, especially from an industry that has been seen as one of America’s competitive strengths and a meritocracy,” says Byers. “And there has been a somewhat laissez-faire attitude from those of us who have enjoyed establishing the field. We need to better address in our academic offerings the importance of values and behaviors and their consequences as it relates to being entrepreneurial and innovative.”

Byers met with Geoffrey Sayre-McCord, director of the UNC Philosophy, Politics, and Economics Program and Morehead-Cain Alumni Distinguished Professor of Philosophy. “Tom found a collaborator in Geoff who has examined ethics in modern business,” says Zoller. “We expect an impactful partnership to emerge between our faculty and our distinguished Keohane Professors.”

Byers also brings his knowledge on tech commercialization. “I am interested in how universities move inventions and discoveries from the lab to society,” he says. Byers met with Judith Cone, Vice Chancellor for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development at UNC. “Judith is a terrific person and a dear colleague and friend since her days at the Kaufman Foundation long ago,” he says. “I’m here to do whatever I can to help her and the new leader at Duke New Ventures.”

“I admire the colleagues who have been chosen as the other three Keohane professors and am happy to serve alongside them,” says Byers.

Byers is excited about the breadth and depth of entrepreneurial and innovation educational opportunities at UNC and Duke.

“The momentum at UNC and Duke is unmistakable,” he says. “The Raleigh/Duke/Chapel Hill area as an economic region is exploding. I hope that I can help make some connections for the schools, identify some opportunities for the schools or help solve some problems that were holding back their even greater levels of success.”

 

Future issues of this newsletter will profile the other Keohane professors.

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Real estate students bring home a case competition trophy [#permalink]

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New post 20 Mar 2018, 18:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Real estate students bring home a case competition trophy
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Every February, UNC Kenan-Flagler invites 16 of the top business schools to compete in the UNC Real Estate Development Challenge, a case competition centered around a specific real estate development project. Four second-year students – Ed Crocker, Mehegan Easley, and Hunter Weaver and I – were chosen as the team to represent UNC Kenan-Flagler in 2018.

The case was written by Dave Hartzell, Steven D. Bell and Leonard W. Wood Distinguished Professor in Real Estate and director of the Leonard W. Wood Center for Real Estate Studies.

The case put each team in the shoes of a real estate development firm responding to a Request for Qualifications for a 2.2-acre site in Washington, D.C. owned by Howard University. We were asked to develop a project that maintained historic features of the site, met Howard University’s and the surrounding community’s needs, and generated long-term economic benefits for all stakeholders. While this task was daunting, our team was well prepared given our mix of backgrounds, knowledge of the market and commitment to bringing the trophy to the hometown team.

We received the case on a Thursday afternoon and had until Sunday evening to compile an entire financial model and presentation. We brainstormed what types of uses we could put on the site and how we would position those uses. Hunter’s background in construction, Ed and Mehegan’s knowledge of the D.C. market, and my financial modeling background allowed us to settle on a mixed-use development called Marshall Place, which would feature ground-floor retail, apartment units, some office space and a hotel.

Through a lot of hard work over those three days, many practice runs of our presentation, and two tough presentations later, we were able to claim first place and bring the trophy home to UNC Kenan-Flagler for the first time since 2015! The experience was very rewarding and expanded my knowledge about real estate development.

First, I learned that development is just as much art as it is science. We used the financial model to consider what sort of uses would generate the maximum return as well as how to structure our deal with our partners. It was just as crucial, though, to consider how the community would receive our uses and whether Howard University would want them. Development takes not only knowledge of financial modeling and construction processes, but also creativity, brainstorming and a lot of trial and error.

Second, I learned that development takes a dedicated, diverse team. Without a doubt, without our teammates’ diverse backgrounds and commitment to creating a winning project, we would not have been able to achieve victory. In real development projects, I’m confident the team is just as important as the development site and idea. It takes a lot of talent to create a successful development.

Finally, I continued to learn the importance of networking in the real estate industry. By bringing together 64 talented real estate students and 16 judges, we had plenty of opportunities to network and make connections. These connections will continue to serve us well in our future careers as they could lead to future employment opportunities or development projects.

By Alex Griffin (MBA ’18)

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Tom Byers to tackle the ethics of entrepreneurship as part of Keohane  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Mar 2018, 07:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Tom Byers to tackle the ethics of entrepreneurship as part of Keohane Professorship
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While Duke and UNC are fierce rivals on the basketball court, UNC’s Ted Zoller and Duke’s Kip Frey are working hand-in-hand to ensure that both schools are leaders in entrepreneurship and innovation.

Zoller, director of the UNC Kenan-Flagler Center for Entrepreneurial Studies, and Frey, interim director of the Duke Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative, are sponsoring residencies for four thought leaders in entrepreneurship. These renowned innovators from around the U.S are sharing their insights and experience with faculty and students at UNC and Duke.

The residencies are supported by a grant from the Keohane Distinguished Visiting Professorship, created by former UNC Chancellor James Moeser in honor of former Duke president Nannerl Keohane’s efforts to bridge the two universities. Entrepreneurship is one of the areas of focus for this year’s professorship.

“We are committed to staying on the cutting edge of what’s happening in pedagogy, research and theory in entrepreneurship,” says Zoller, T.W. Lewis Clinical Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship. “As one of the best programs in entrepreneurship with our ‘Learn, Launch, Lead’ model, we will benefit from having thought leaders of this character on campus and learn from them as we make our curriculum and programs distinctive in a global manner.”

The recipients of the professorship and their area of focus during their residency are:

  • Bill Aulet, managing director of the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship: disciplined entrepreneurship
  • Tom Byers, faculty director, Stanford Technology Ventures Program: technology commercialization and ethics
  • Jim Clifton, chairman and CEO, Gallup: leadership
  • Rebecca White, director of the Entrepreneurship Center at The University of Tampa: competency-based education
While on the two campuses, each thought leader engages with faculty and students, gives a plenary address, and works with Zoller and Frey to raise the bar for their programs’ quality.

“All of them are  leaders in frontier areas for our program,” says Zoller. “By helping us benchmark national best practices in their areas of expertise, they will boost our gravitational pull and reach the next orbit. And working hand-in-hand with Duke, we can help build an even higher performing entrepreneurial ecosystem.”

Byers has been an important global leader for more than 20 years in the Stanford Technology Ventures Program, which has helped connect the innovation community with the entrepreneurship community, says Zoller. “He has been involved in a very central way with the development of the Silicon Valley ecosystem.”

After a successful career in Silicon Valley, including as a key leader at Symantec Corporation during its formation, Byers joined Stanford’s faculty in 1995. “I have enjoyed being part of a growing community of academics who identify with the discipline of innovation and entrepreneurship,” says Byers. “This field used to be just war stories but now it’s an evidence-based management science that’s a true accepted discipline.”

Now that innovation and entrepreneurship have arrived as a discipline, Byers is looking toward the future. “Anybody can learn innovation and entrepreneurship,” he says. “It’s time to take a fresh look at our overall purpose. What can be our next step toward ascending our own top of Everest?”

A mission of his center at Stanford is to help other colleges. “In the spirit of a rising tide raises all boats, we want to be part of that rising tide,” he says. “We’ve always been connected with lots of institutions around the world. Duke and UNC in particular are of interest since they are peer institutions with Stanford.  I have as much to learn here as to share.”

Sharing effective practices among Duke, UNC and Stanford in teaching innovation and entrepreneurship is one of the areas of focus for Byers. He is also tackling ethics, one of the most pressing issues facing Silicon Valley.

Highly visible ethics breaches in high profile companies blare from the headlines. Just two examples: Uber’s issues included price gouging, sexual harassment and the behavior of its former CEO, while Elizabeth Holmes, founder and chief executive of the blood-testing company Theranos, has been charged with fraud by the Securities and Exchange Commission.

“The relationship of ethics as a discipline to innovation and entrepreneurship education is something we need to take a good look at,” he says.

“Ethical lapses are disappointing, especially from an industry that has been seen as one of America’s competitive strengths and a meritocracy,” says Byers. “And there has been a somewhat laissez-faire attitude from those of us who have enjoyed establishing the field. We need to better address in our academic offerings the importance of values and behaviors and their consequences as it relates to being entrepreneurial and innovative.”

Byers met with Geoffrey Sayre-McCord, director of the UNC Philosophy, Politics, and Economics Program and Morehead-Cain Alumni Distinguished Professor of Philosophy. “Tom found a collaborator in Geoff who has examined ethics in modern business,” says Zoller. “We expect an impactful partnership to emerge between our faculty and our distinguished Keohane Professors.”

Byers also brings his knowledge on tech commercialization. “I am interested in how universities move inventions and discoveries from the lab to society,” he says. Byers met with Judith Cone, Vice Chancellor for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development at UNC. “Judith is a terrific person and a dear colleague and friend since her days at the Kaufman Foundation long ago,” he says. “I’m here to do whatever I can to help her and the new leader at Duke New Ventures.”

“I admire the colleagues who have been chosen as the other three Keohane professors and am happy to serve alongside them,” says Byers.

Byers is excited about the breadth and depth of entrepreneurial and innovation educational opportunities at UNC and Duke.

“The momentum at UNC and Duke is unmistakable,” he says. “The Raleigh/Duke/Chapel Hill area as an economic region is exploding. I hope that I can help make some connections for the schools, identify some opportunities for the schools or help solve some problems that were holding back their even greater levels of success.”

Future issues of this newsletter will profile the other Keohane professors.

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Perspectives on the UNC Clean Tech Summit [#permalink]

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New post 23 Mar 2018, 12:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Perspectives on the UNC Clean Tech Summit
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Adam Monroe, president of Novozymes Americas, was a keynote speaker at the 2018 UNC Clean Tech Summit.

Novzymes is a leader in the biological organism space. It relies on a diverse team of technical professionals to reduce the environmental impact caused by the agricultural, industrial, energy and pharmaceutical industries through the application of enzymes.

Monroe believes humankind taken significant steps forward through using modern technologies, but people still need to leverage tools found in nature to combat the impact that the modern age is having on the planet.

Monroe began with a simple question: “The redwood tree can consist of up to 2,000 tons of mass. Where does all of this mass come from?”

He explained that nature has developed a system of converting H2O and CO2 into carbohydrates using enzymes. Effectively, nature has found a way to reduce CO2 emissions in a process that requires no external energy source while proving positive externalities for the environment.

Nature has developed thousands of enzymes that are far more efficient than current manmade solutions, he said.

Using enzymes in the textile industry reduces the amount of water, electricity and chemicals required per batch. It provides a win-win-win scenario for the manufacturers, consumers and the environment. Manufacturers reduce the raw inputs needed per unit and can lower prices allowing them to become more cost competitive while maintaining margins. Consumers benefit by receiving the same quality products at lower prices. Environmental impact is decreased as less water, chemicals and energy are needed to produce the same volume of goods.

These impacts are not just realized at industrial levels. “Roughly 70 percent of the CO2 emissions involved in the process is due to the hot or cold water that is involved in washing the clothes,” he said. “The huge breakthrough in my field is the ability to wash your clothes in cold water and achieve the same results.” Applications at the household level, on a global scale, could lead to material reductions in total carbon emissions.

Monroe shared Novozymes’ “Global Goals,” and acknowledged the difficulty of quantifying the value that being environmentally conscious brings to a business. A differentiator for Novozymes among its competitors in the renewables space is its attractive returns, reporting a 25.6 percent ROIC in its 2017 annual report.

Monroe is excited about the prospects the future holds by leveraging these returns to promote renewable initiatives.

“Science is incredibly important,” he said. “While it’s human nature to chase the latest technological silver bullet, we have to pursue the opportunities with the information we already have.”

Watch Monroe’s presentation here.

 

Renewable energy and politics

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The solar industry in North Carolina started about 10 years ago and the state has since become the number two solar power generator in the U.S.

In the early phases of solar power development in North Carolina, U.S. Senator Thom Tillis was serving as a member of the North Carolina House of Representatives. He spoke about the challenges of implementing solar projects and his view that renewables would have a place in power generation moving forward. In 2010 a state tax credit for solar was slated to expire and Tillis was outspoken about the need to pass a bill for its extension. “These were the things that we were going to have to do to give the industry viability.”

There was significant push back from his Republican colleagues for his support on this issue but what differentiated Tillis from his colleagues was his view that absolutism on energy policy was not the answer. By avoiding demonizing language, and compromising with members of his own party and Democrats, he was able to construct a bi-partisan policy and incentivize collaboration on energy.

Till served eight years in the state house before he was elected to the U.S. Senate. Energy remains a priority for him and he says he is an advocate for reduced regulation on new technologies. “I think we can dramatically contract the regulatory system to expedite the way that new technologies can be tested, too,” he said.

He went on to explain that politicians in Washington frequently confuse what is good policy with partisan politics. Some fellow senators refuse to compromise at the risk of appearing to have betrayed their constituency, he said, and maintains his stance that policy does not have to be binary. “Let’s not do ‘It’s good or bad.’ Let’s find a way to minimize costs whether it’s a republican administration or a democrat administration.”

Reflecting on his professional experiences before he political career, he said his roles in research and development and consulting shaped his perspective on business and hone his analytical abilities. When asked what advice he had for those entering the workforce he replied, “What we need you all to do is not take the bait of getting your information from any one source. Sit down and take the time to rationalize it and consider the tradeoffs. Spend time understanding options analysis, risk assessment and risk analysis.”

The UNC Kenan-Flagler faculty and staff have echoed this sentiment, so I feel it is safe to say my classmates and I are headed in the right direction.

Watch the video interview with Tillis here.

By Trey Martin (MBA ’19)

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Studying in Italy to learn about myself [#permalink]

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New post 28 Mar 2018, 20:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Studying in Italy to learn about myself
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Clockwise from top: Consulting casing prep with Steffen Schlict, Fabio Fratta, Gianvito Amoruso, Daniel Paranhos, Melih Kalkan, Ludovico Rizzuto

I decided to pursue an exchange program to complement my time at UNC Kenan-Flagler with an immersive cross-cultural experience and build a more diverse circle of friends. I chose SDA Bocconi in Milan, Italy, which known for its formidable reputation, small class size and strategic location.

I started at Bocconi not exactly knowing what to expect as joined the busiest term of the curriculum. Its recruiting had kicked into high gear – consulting firms were the talk of the town. Classes were quite fascinating with an Italian touch – I was enrolled in three and basic Italian. They were primarily case-based and participation was a vital component.

Classes at Bocconi aren’t held at regular intervals like they are at U.S. schools, which helped me travel during the week and weekends. I traveled all over Europe and to the Far East to meet fellow Tar Heels, longtime friends and forge new friendships. I visited historic landmarks – La Sagrada Familia, the Last Supper, Angkor Wat and the Hagia Sofia – testaments of enduring grandeur, silent witnesses to the passage of time.

I tried the best of foods and drinks – Italian coffee/pizza/gelato, Spanish tapas, Pad Thai, Swiss fondue/Rivelin, Danish Smørrebrød, Turkish coffee/baklava, Belgian waffles/chocolates and French croissants. I was greeted with kindness and boundless generosity from friends and strangers alike

I spent an incredible three months building some of my happiest memories; my time at Bocconi became the highlight of my time as a student. I wanted to get a general understanding of the Italian culture, the people, and their traditions and definitely make some new friends – and here’s what I learned.

The people

I have lived in and travelled extensively in the Western Hemisphere, and Italians are hands down the friendliest people. They are warm, boisterous, laid back, passionate and emotional, many qualities found in my culture and country, India. For instance, we addressed our Italian professor as “Mama”’ Susanna. In addition, Italians have a strong family-centric culture, another similarity with the South Asian diaspora. These Italian qualities were perhaps the reasons I easily connected with and made some amazing friends at Bocconi.

Despite its relatively small size, Italy’s traditions and customs are vastly different as you move southward from Milan to Rome to Bari. I witnessed the Italian hospitality first hand from the professors, students and staff.

The concept of time

This is a touchy topic but Italians operate on their own standard time – personal and professorial instances. Being 15-20 minutes late is fairly common. Based on what I gathered, Milan in northern Italy, where I spent most of my time, is known for being generally “punctual,” as in, being 15-20 minutes late is acceptable, while that the degree of lateness increases as you travel southward.

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Collage of memories with the Bocconi family

Paying it forward: Bocconi, like most European schools, is a one-year program. Students do not have the luxury of second-year career mentors sharing their experiences. I realized I had the opportunity to share the wealth of consulting-specific knowledge I gained at UNC Kenan-Flagler.

This was my value proposition during their busiest term that served two purposes:

  • Time spent with the students helps me get to know them.
  • Sharing knowledge is the UNC Kenan-Flagler way of paying it forward.
I was extremely fortunate to receive rigorous training in consulting recruiting’s best practices at UNC Kenan-Flagler. In early January, I reached out to Bocconi’s consulting club president, Steffen Schlicht, to examine ways I could help. We teamed up to organize a “crack the case” crash course where folks gained insights into consulting interview prep. What followed was an unexpected and a remarkable turn of events. By the time the term ended, I had the incredible privilege to spend some 60+ hours with some of Bocconi’s best students helping them refine their résumé walks, casing prep, STAR stories and general interview preparation. I remember the advice from our professor Dr. Chris Bingham: Change can be small and incremental, but these small steps will ultimately have an impact. What an impact it had – these brilliant folks, some of whom have become really close friends went on to get multiple internship offers at Strategy&, A.T. Kearney, Roland Berger, Alvarez and Marsal, Bain and Company, Alix Partners, The Boston Consulting Group and Facebook, to name a few.

Final thoughts

I have always believed travel to be therapeutic to the soul. My time at Bocconi was transformational in many ways. Bocconi and Italy truly felt like home as I accumulated a treasure trove of joyful memories, an enhanced clarity on myself as an individual. I hope my experiences would encourage folks to travel, explore, expand worldviews, shed parochial inhibitions, and interact with a multitude of cultures.

My experiences, the incredible people and my wonderful Bocconi friends taught me a few things about the importance of slowing down, not everything needs to happen on schedule and according to plan; that it’s ok to be a little late (at times), and enjoying some of the finer aspects of life (food, wine, gelato and, of course, coffee).

Perhaps the most important aspect that was reinforced while I was here was the human element. Despite numerous superficial differences in cultures, languages, customs, nationalities, experiences, ethnicities, we have more in common that unites us. To quote the words of Margaret Atwood and echo the words of our wise Italian Professor Scarponi – “I hope that people will finally come to realize that there is only one race – the human race – and that we are all members of it.” That is all that matters at the end of the day.

 

By Gowtam Atthipalli (MBA ’18)

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Winning communication [#permalink]

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New post 03 Apr 2018, 07:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Winning communication
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Two UNC Kenan-Flagler students were winners in the Association for Business Communication (ABC) student writing competition. Roshni Verma (BSBA ’18) won first place and Tyler Tonnesen (BSBA ’18) came in third. Their professor Michael Meredith, clinical associate professor of management and corporate communication, accepted the awards on their behalf at ABC’s 2017 conference in Ireland.

Meredith often uses the competition’s case scenario as a writing prompt for his Management and Corporate Communications class. As with any other assignment, every student receives a grade, but Meredith also picks the best two submissions and nominates them for the competition.

“The reason I like to assign this case is I believe in case and scenario learning for undergraduates because they typically don’t have extended work experience,” said Meredith. “It really brings the importance of critical thinking and business writing to life.”

His students have had a lot of success at the international competition in the past. Kristen Brews (BSBA ’13) came in first place in 2012, and Katherine Shaw (BSBA –) placed second in 2015.

All of the students were in Meredith’s Management and Corporate Communications class. The class, commonly referred to as Busi 401, is a required class at UNC Kenan-Flagler. It focuses on effective and efficient communication primarily through written assignments and presentations. Students spend the semester writing emails, constructing memos, tailoring resumes, and practicing presentations.

The information covered in Busi 401 benefits students across all of UNC Kenan-Flagler’s areas of emphasis because it applies to all roles and industries. Whether a student ends up at Bank of America or goes to work at a nonprofit, they will use the skills they learned in the class.

Students also use the skills before they enter the workforce. Busi 401 helps them prepare for job applications by teaching them how to fine tune their resumes and write cover letters that add to an application. It’s important, concentrated, and hands-on information  many students would never receive without the communication class.

Additionally, Meredith conveys the importance and real world applicability of the Busi 401 material by assigning realistic writing scenarios and showing students examples of company’s poor writing techniques.

The ABC student writing competition is another chance for students to put all they learned over the semester to a real-world test. For the competition, a committee of business communication faculty and two business professionals blindly review the nominated student’s work. The judges evaluate the work based upon a number of factors including its strategic response to the scenario, understanding of the audience, support and writing execution. This rigorous judging process makes his students’ wins all that more impressive.

“This is the first time two students from the same institution have won in the same year;  to do that when it was a blind reviewed by both academics and industry professionals  really speaks to the quality of what these students accomplished,” said Meredith.

Their wins also speak to the importance of the Busi 401 class and Meredith’s teaching abilities.

A business communication class is not unique to UNC Kenan-Flagler. Most business schools offer some form of Busi 401 but very few can claim that their classes help students win international awards.

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How UNC Business Essentials helped me secure an internship [#permalink]

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New post 06 Apr 2018, 09:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: How UNC Business Essentials helped me secure an internship
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I am always looking for ways to develop myself professionally to prepare for my job search as I get closer to graduating from college. With a schedule full of academic commitments and extracurriculars, it is not easy to find time for these opportunities. With UNC Business Essentials (UBE), I developed useful skills and knowledge, but on my own time

I am a junior at UNC-Chapel Hill majoring in economics and global studies with a minor in entrepreneurship. I have aspirations of working in the business world, particularly in banking or technology. I needed to gain basic business skills and an understanding of concepts that would help me to pursue my career goals. My schedule is packed with classes that are relevant and required for my majors, but leave me with no room to take additional classes at the UNC Kenan-Flagler.

I searched for other ways to learn business concepts in a way that fit my schedule – and UBE was the solution. I formed a strong foundation of business concepts with the flexibility that my schedule needed. I completed UBE during the summer of 2017 prior to starting my junior year. This was a crucial time for me to do the program because at the end of the summer and throughout the fall, I was vigorously searching for an internship for the summer of 2018. I wanted to prepare for networking and interviews, especially since I was pursuing opportunities primarily in banking.

Throughout the fall, I had numerous interviews with various companies and I cannot count how many times I used information gained from the UBE online program during interviews and networking sessions. UBE gave me the confidence to discuss topics that are relevant to the industry and companies I interviewed with, being able to use and understand business terms in interviews and information sessions.

Having the flexibility of completing UBE on my own time outside of my busy schedule allowed me to prepare for my internship search. I secured an internship as a business analyst with Bank of America, and I am thankful for UBE in serving as one of the crucial tools that helped me get this opportunity.

By Alexander Bianchi (BA ’19)

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How UNC Business Essentials helped me become more global [#permalink]

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New post 06 Apr 2018, 09:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: How UNC Business Essentials helped me become more global
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I first heard about UNC Undergraduate Business Essentials from my mom while I studying abroad at the National University of Singapore. A letter was sent to my house about the benefits of the UBE program. My mom read me the letter and immediately I was convinced—this is a program that I can do at my own pace and provide me with skills that are beneficial anywhere across the globe.

I actually chose to start my online classes towards the end of my study abroad program, since I didn’t have much classwork, and within a few hours of doing the courses I could see how these business skills are transferable across any field, and any country. Being in Singapore, one of the friendliest economies in the world for business, gave me many opportunities to talk to both students and professionals in the field. Through conversations with individuals who had opened their own businesses in the country, or were part of the expanding financial sector, I understood how they were using their business knowledge to help their companies to grow on the other side of the world!

Through these conversations, and my time abroad, I witnessed how the material I was learning through Kenan-Flagler were impacted by cultures and customs, and used my international experience to really understand the value in developing these business skills. So while business may differ in some ways across the world, having an understanding of business principles will be an asset no matter where you are.

Since returning to UNC, I have realized I want global career. UBE has provided me with the business foundation that will benefit me in any country I land in. I now have a strong skillset that will help me gain the international exposure that I crave and I am currently planning to study abroad again. I can’t wait to put my UBE knowledge to the test in new, unknown territory!

Ally Daws, Economics & Global Studies, ‘19

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
How UNC Business Essentials helped me become more global   [#permalink] 06 Apr 2018, 09:00

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