It is currently 23 Oct 2017, 03:20

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

UNC Kenan-Flagler MBA Admissions and Related blogs

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Nov 2013
Posts: 77

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

MAC Admissions: How long will it take me to earn the degree? How long  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Sep 2017, 18:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: MAC Admissions: How long will it take me to earn the degree? How long do I have to finish?
Image
12 to 36 months. Yes, that’s right; in just one year, you can earn a Master of Accounting degree from the top-ranked UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School.

Our on-campus format, a full-time program designed for students who are not working, starts each year at the end of June and wraps up the following June. One year, one powerful degree. You’ll very likely heading into — or continuing with — one remarkable job as well.

In our online format, you set the speed. You can start in January, March, June, or September, and if you take a full load, you can also finish in 12 months. If you’d like to roll at slower pace so that you better manage your time with work, family, or other commitments, you can extend your time in the program up to 36 months.

>> Download our “ROI” whitepaper, with a speed-to-degree analysis comparing the MAC with other popular pursuits

>> Download the “Quality Control Audit”, a helpful worksheet to compare online graduate programs

 

Other graduate accounting programs appear to be faster — what gives?

First of all, most aren’t. In fact, many programs are 18-24 months. Secondly, most programs that advertise nine- or ten-month options require students to have taken numerous prerequisite courses before starting the program. Unless you have already take these required classes, you’ll need to add on the time required to complete that work. Finally, many “lighter” programs are, in fact, lighter. They remove much of the critical “soft-skills” curriculum that sets leading Master of Accounting programs apart from the rest. It is these same soft skills that most employers are not only seeking, but requiring, from their new hires.

 

Can I get credit — or waivers — for having already completed some accounting/business coursework?

In our online format, yes. Students who have completed accounting courses as part of their undergraduate studies or in pursuit of their MBA may apply for course waivers for up to three courses (12 total credits). These waivers reduce the total credits required to complete the program and, subsequently, the overall tuition cost. Because our on-campus format operates on a fixed schedule, course waivers are not available; however, a wide variety of electives — covering topics related to law, governmental accounting, economics, negotiations, finance, leadership, and data analytics — allow students to customize their curriculum during their time in the program.

 

How is the pace of your program impacted by the firm recruiting schedule?

It isn’t. This said, several significant recruiting events are built in to the academic calendar. Starting in July, and running through September, a series of employer forums and networking functions introduce students to the numerous firms and corporations that recruit — and hire — from both formats of the UNC MAC Program. In late-September, a comprehensive Interview Week allows students to break from their classes to attend firm interviews in Chapel Hill.

 

We’re here to help.

If you are interested in applying to our program, the information above may have only scratched the surface. We’d encourage you to learn more about our top-ranked program, request a consultation with one of our admissions experts, or download our speed-to-degree analysis or online programs comparison worksheet.

 

 

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Nov 2013
Posts: 77

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

MAC Admissions: Talk to me about flexibility in your online format. [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Sep 2017, 18:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: MAC Admissions: Talk to me about flexibility in your online format.
Image
When you’re working full-time, or serving in the military, or raising a family, or deeply involved as a volunteer to a local non-profit organization, finding time for grad school can be challenging. However, with enough flexibility — and motivation — you can not only succeed, but do so with flying colors. You’ll supply the motivation; we’ll deliver the flexibility…in droves.

 

Here’s how:

(1) You set the pace. Have the time? Take a full load. Tight on time? Take a lighter load. Emergency life event surfaces? Pause for a term. By regulating your pace, you can manage your academic plan to balance with the other demands in your life.

(2) Study on your schedule. Weekly live sessions are conveniently held in the evening, starting as late as 9:00pm on the U.S. eastern time zone. The rest of the work — video lectures, homework assignments, and, to some degree, even exams — are completed at a time that you choose.

(3) Log in from anywhere. To access the learning management system, all you need is a browser and an internet connection. Watch the lectures where it’s most convenient…on a laptop, tablet, or phone at home, at the office, or on the beach!

>> Watch video perspectives from students enrolled in the online format

>> Download the “Quality Control Audit”, a helpful worksheet to compare online graduate programs

 

Do you hold classes in the evening?

Yes. In fact, multiple sessions are held for most classes; our academic advisors can help you find a session that fits your schedule. Each course you take will have one, two-hour live sessions each week.

 

If I have to travel, can I take the coursework with me?

Yes, absolutely. Video lectures and homework assignments can even be downloaded so that you watch/complete them on any device without even connecting to wifi. For live classes, we recommend a strong internet connection run through a desktop or laptop computer, but there are no limitations on where you can log in from. Students have logged in from vacations, when traveling for business, and even from military bases in Afghanistan.

 

Can I get in touch with my professor when I need help? And, what about tech support?

Of course. Our faculty are open to connect with students and hold office hours online, just as they do for students in the on-campus format. Our professors — many of whom were working professionals themselves — understand the time demands on students. Technical support is offered 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

 

We’re here to help.

If you are interested in applying to our program, the information above may have only scratched the surface. We’d encourage you to learn more about our top-ranked program, request a consultation with one of our admissions experts, watch video perspectives from online students, or download our online programs comparison worksheet.

 

 

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Nov 2013
Posts: 77

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

MAC Student Perspectives: Interview Week [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Sep 2017, 14:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: MAC Student Perspectives: Interview Week
Image

The first term of classes is done, finals are over, and those participating in structured recruiting have the most stressful, yet exciting, week of the program thus far — Interview Week.

Most of the students in the program, in both the on-campus and online formats, participated in Interview Week. Each of us was excited and nervous about getting closer to knowing where we will work after we graduate next year. It’s crazy to think that even though we are only one-fifth of the way through the program, we are already interviewing for positions that we will be starting next fall or later. For some of us, this felt like the most important week of the program. After all, having a job after graduation is something that definitely occupies our minds.

Social events with the accounting firms and other companies started Sunday evening. My first one was with Deloitte. It was probably one of the biggest of the week. It was Casino-Night themed; we gambled with play money as we ate hors d’oeuvres and met with Deloitte representatives that would be interviewing us the next day. It was a fun experience.

The following morning was exciting in its own way. I interviewed with someone from the office where I’m interested in working, and I went out feeling like it had gone well. This was the case with most interviews and the Career Services staff had really helped us prepare. All my interviewers were very personable and I felt like all the interviews went well.

I have to admit that even though my week consisted of just a couple of interviews during the day and socials at night, I was very tired by the end of it. Who would have thought? By the end of the week, I thought I wasn’t going to have enough energy during the interviews, but it’s hard not to be excited when you know that what you’re doing is for your future. The hard part comes now — waiting for the office visits and second round of interviews!

by Yuri Cabeza, MAC ’18

>> Learn more about the UNC MAC student experience

 

 

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Nov 2013
Posts: 77

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Second-year MBA mindset [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Sep 2017, 16:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Second-year MBA mindset
Image
Coming back onto campus for your second year of business school, the first question you often hear is, “How was your summer?” It’s a great way to exchange information about the opportunities your MBA internship offered. But the question that often does not get asked is, “What is your plan for the second year?”

Whether or not you received job offers from your summer internships, getting into the best mindset to extract as much value as possible from your second year is incredibly important. Here are some tips for getting your mind right for the final year of business school.

Reflect

Take the time to reflect on what you learned throughout the summer. Your internship might have been a whirlwind of activity, but it provided a wealth of opportunities for you to continue to sharpen your business skills and be exposed to new challenges. Taking time to deliberately capture these lessons will help you adapt more quickly to challenges you will face in your full-time position.

The beginning of the second year is an excellent time to think about what you did or did not like about the internship experience and evaluate how your career choices fit in with your overall life plan. This reflection could yield important themes that you’ll apply to your future career. Thomas Paine may as well have been speaking about an MBA internship when he said, “The real man [woman] smiles in trouble, gathers strength from success, and grows brave by reflection.”

Prepare

There are several ways to design your second year of business school. While the option to “coast” is very appealing, the learning opportunities you will have in your second year are irreplaceable. Some of the most intelligent professors in the world are around you, and taking their classes can illuminate new passions or draw new connections for your future job. Take classes that will challenge and grow you as a professional, and avoid taking classes that require the least amount of work. Even if you are concentrating in investment banking, a class in real estate might be incredibly beneficial for a future problem your company faces.

Consolidating and solidifying your network is absolutely critical in your second year. Ensure the connections you forged during your first year are not forgotten, and guarantee that those connections understand the value you can create after graduation. Additionally, maintaining positive contact with your network helps solidify UNC Kenan-Flagler’s reputation amongst alumni and within industries.

Help

Helping around campus is an outright obligation during your second year, but the method by which you choose to help is up to you. The learning opportunities you have been provided at School and the help you’ve received from those ahead of you are debts that are important to repay. Unlike student loans, helping to improve the academic and reputational quality of the institution is paramount. Volunteering to tutor or mentor is an excellent way to give back without breaking the bank. Pursuing leadership opportunities in extracurricular activities is not only a way to bolster your resume, but a tangible commitment to continuing the traditions of UNC Kenan-Flagler.

And finally, yes, you should be planning to make a financial commitment to the school post-graduation. UNC Kenan-Flagler derives only 12 percent of its funding from the state (the smallest of any top-20 school), and planning to donate will ensure future students are blessed with the same opportunities that current students have.

By Matthew Leitch (MBA ’18)

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Nov 2013
Posts: 77

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Lights, camera, accounting! [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Sep 2017, 16:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Lights, camera, accounting!
Image
Hollywood might well be the biggest, most glamorous industry in the U.S. While the most notable members of the industry are the famous actors and directors walk the red carpet, there’s important work going on “behind the scenes” in an industry that is incredibly complex and multifaceted.

About a dozen studios produce, film, and distribute the lion’s share of movies we see in theaters. But how does Hollywood define success? Is it highest box office gross? The number of awards? Or is it some other factor?

When it comes down to it, these studios are businesses, and their goal is to make as much money as possible. Most people look at the global box office revenue to determine how successful a movie is, but that measure can be misleading. You have to take into account production costs, marketing costs and even inflation.

Can you guess the highest grossing movies? Take a second to think about it – and select one considering inflation and select a second without taking inflation into account. Think you have it? If you guessed “Gone With the Wind” with inflation and “Avatar” without it, then you got it! Both of these movies grossed more than $3 billion.

Movie studios get plenty of money from other sources besides the box office. Take “The Lion King,” for example. The movie grossed close to $1 billion worldwide, but Disney continues to make money from the franchise through the Broadway musical. In 2014, the musical surpassed “The Phantom of the Opera” as the highest grossing show of all time, surpassing $6 billion.

Large sums of money come in from a variety of sources and then allocated to the many different spheres in which the studios operate. It’s big business

“Hollywood studios need accountants – and they need very talented ones,” says Jana Raedy, associate professor of accounting, Ernst & Young Scholar in Accounting and associate dean of the Master of Accounting Program.

The accounting industry is expected to experience 13 percent job growth from 2012 to 2022, with experts predicting 160,000 new accountants will be needed in the next decade.

Accounting is a very diverse industry that offers a lot of opportunity and career mobility, says Raedy.

Maybe you could take your talents to Hollywood and get your big break!

 

By Jack Joyce (BA ’18)        

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 27 Sep 2017
Posts: 6

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: UNC Kenan-Flagler MBA Admissions and Related blogs [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Sep 2017, 23:41
Hi! thanks for interesting articles!

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Nov 2013
Posts: 77

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Making an impact on illiteracy in the workplace [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Oct 2017, 14:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Making an impact on illiteracy in the workplace
Image
I worked with Triangle Literacy Council (TLC), a local education nonprofit, for my 2017 summer internship. TLC’s goal is to “improve the lives of adults, youth, and families by teaching basic literacy and life skills for economic and social success.” TLC does incredible work in this community, sometimes serving populations that others do not, like incarcerated adults and criminally involved youth.

When I came aboard, TLC was rolling out a new program aimed at delivering literacy instruction to undereducated workers at their place of employment. They needed a marketing plan and high-quality marketing materials. That’s where I came in.

To give a bit of background, illiteracy is a serious problem in our community and around the U.S. One in seven American adults is functionally illiterate, meaning they lack the literacy skills to be successful in their daily lives.

The effects of illiteracy on people’s personal lives can be large. Many are ashamed to admit their struggles and hide their illiteracy from even their closest friends and family. They struggle to find and retain jobs. The economic costs to individuals are high. From the employer perspective, this is a drag on businesses and the local economy. Businesses need skilled workers and the foundation of acquiring any skill is the ability to read.

I began the summer by researching similar literacy programs around the country to understand how others went about structuring these services and how they were marketing them. Many larger metro areas offer similar services, but I quickly found that the Triangle area has no such literacy interventions. Nothing better than entering a market with no competitors!

Next, I researched industries in the area with high populations of undereducated workers, and after my TLC colleagues, we decided to target four industries. I took a deep dive into those industries to understand their struggles and how could we effectively market our literacy program as a solution to the issues they face.

After deciding how to target each industry, I began the process of developing materials. I created outreach materials, brochures and infographics to support TLC as it began outreach. I also compiled a set of leads, businesses that were likely to need our services and their contact information. By the end of the summer, TLC was in talks with a local agency to begin services in January 2018.

The classes I’ve taken at UNC Kenan-Flagler were crucial in the successes that I had this summer. As a former educator in both public schools and a nonprofit, I had a solid understanding of the education landscape, but I was completely new to the business workings of an organization. I often went back to my notes from the ‘core’ marketing course as a way to structure my thinking. I also frequently used skills I learned in the Professional Communication class. Communicating my ideas in a clear and engaging way to colleagues at TLC was key to moving the project forward.

I couldn’t have done this work without the support of the Social Impact Summer Grant. I’m so thankful to have had the opportunity to merge my passion for education with the business acumen I am honing here at UNC Kenan-Flagler. But most importantly, I’m thrilled to have worked with an organization making an impact and improving this community.

By Jake Stallard (MBA ’18)

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Nov 2013
Posts: 77

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Closing the deal: Negotiating job offers [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Oct 2017, 16:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Closing the deal: Negotiating job offers
Image
Finding a job is difficult. You spend countless hours searching job listings, engaging in a string of interviews and enduring anxiety-filled days waiting to hear if you got the job.

After all of that work, accepting the first offer from the company can be tempting. Sure you thought your salary could have been a little higher or your vacation a few weeks longer, but you got a job and that is all that matters, right?

Wrong. If you are not happy with the initial offer, negotiate. You can use a number of strategies to improve your compensation package while maintaining a positive relationship with your future employer.

Negotiating is not a power struggle or a tug-of-war. It is simply identifying the gaps between the offer you got and the offer you want and sharing them with your prospective employer.

Taking time to respond
Once you receive an offer, there is no rush to accept it right away. Make sure to express your gratitude for the offer and show enthusiasm to keep the opportunity alive, but then tell the employer when you will get back to them. Do not wait for the company to give you a deadline because their urgency to close the deal might not give you much time to fully consider the offer. Instead give them a date – two, three or four days out – and let them push back if they want a response sooner.

Before jumping straight into negotiating, you might need to gather additional information. This could mean reaching out to the company with a question or two. You will likely want to keep the information-gathering separate from negotiating to give yourself time to create a strategy.

Negotiating
Similar to buying a house, the company does not generally start with its best offer. Employers expect you to negotiate, so they give themselves a little bit of room for discussion. If you do not negotiate, there is a good chance you are leaving money on the table.

Don’t worry about the repercussions of negotiating because it is highly unlikely the company would rescind your offer, especially if you approach it in a polite and understanding way. They would just say “no” and the original offer would still be on the table for consideration.

 Beginning the process
Start by doing research on the company. Websites such as payscale.com, salary.com and glassdoor.com provide information on salaries. Job boards and trade/professional associations might also provide insights into compensation for your job or similar ones. If you are negotiating with a nonprofit, the organization must file paperwork with the government stating salaries of the five highest-paid staff. You can find that information on guidestar.com and help ensure your expectations are in line with the employer’s pay structure.

Once you have gathered information, approach the hiring manager – versus human resources – who will know best how well you will fit the team’s needs and are the most invested in bringing you on board. That person also will be in a position to champion you with human resources and other parties involved in the negotiation.

When you start the conversation with the hiring manager, tell them that you have carefully considered the offer and would like to discuss it. There is no need to use the word “negotiate.” Start on a positive note by expressing interest in the job and sharing a few positives about the offer. Then let them know what falls short. Begin with the salary because it is typically the largest part of the package, and if the hiring manager is unable to match your salary request, she/he might feel more compelled to give more of something else.

Discussing salary
If you are asking for an increased salary, you might want to add some insight on why you think a higher figure is appropriate. Do you have more years of experience than the average new hire or have you experienced standout success in the industry?  If the company is not able to improve the salary, you might want to explore an increase in your performance bonus. It is easier for companies to justify paying you more if you are doing more work. You also can ask for an early salary review.

When discussing salary, the company might ask what you want. Avoid giving a specific figure. Instead, talk in general ranges like “from the mid 80’s to the upper 90’s” to give yourself some flexibility. Stating a specific number could lock you in at that amount when you could have gotten a bit more.

 Don’t be too concerned about taking your requests too far, as the employer will tell you if you have reached a limit. In most cases, keep your requests for further improvement to one or two requests on each point – do not keep going back and forth.

Remember most of negotiating is asking questions or simply sharing your concerns, not making demands. If you raise your points in a professional and polite way, the company will be much more responsive than if you make demands.

Understanding what’s negotiable
Most parts of a compensation package are negotiable. Aside from salary, you can discuss signing and performance bonuses, commissions, vacation, relocation benefits and more. The only two items that are not negotiable for the average employee are health-care benefits and 401(k) retirement plans.

By Kelly McNeil (BSBA ’19)

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Nov 2013
Posts: 77

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Closing the deal: Negotiating job offers [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Oct 2017, 20:02
FROM Kenan Flagler Executive MBA Blog: Closing the deal: Negotiating job offers
Image
Finding a job is difficult. You spend countless hours searching job listings, engaging in a string of interviews and enduring anxiety-filled days waiting to hear if you got the job.

After all of that work, accepting the first offer from the company can be tempting. Sure you thought your salary could have been a little higher or your vacation a few weeks longer, but you got a job and that is all that matters, right?

Wrong. If you are not happy with the initial offer, negotiate. You can use a number of strategies to improve your compensation package while maintaining a positive relationship with your future employer.

Negotiating is not a power struggle or a tug-of-war. It is simply identifying the gaps between the offer you got and the offer you want and sharing them with your prospective employer.

Taking time to respond
Once you receive an offer, there is no rush to accept it right away. Make sure to express your gratitude for the offer and show enthusiasm to keep the opportunity alive, but then tell the employer when you will get back to them. Do not wait for the company to give you a deadline because their urgency to close the deal might not give you much time to fully consider the offer. Instead give them a date – two, three or four days out – and let them push back if they want a response sooner.

Before jumping straight into negotiating, you might need to gather additional information. This could mean reaching out to the company with a question or two. You will likely want to keep the information-gathering separate from negotiating to give yourself time to create a strategy.

Negotiating
Similar to buying a house, the company does not generally start with its best offer. Employers expect you to negotiate, so they give themselves a little bit of room for discussion. If you do not negotiate, there is a good chance you are leaving money on the table.

Don’t worry about the repercussions of negotiating because it is highly unlikely the company would rescind your offer, especially if you approach it in a polite and understanding way. They would just say “no” and the original offer would still be on the table for consideration.

 Beginning the process
Start by doing research on the company. Websites such as payscale.com, salary.com and glassdoor.com provide information on salaries. Job boards and trade/professional associations might also provide insights into compensation for your job or similar ones. If you are negotiating with a nonprofit, the organization must file paperwork with the government stating salaries of the five highest-paid staff. You can find that information on guidestar.com and help ensure your expectations are in line with the employer’s pay structure.

Once you have gathered information, approach the hiring manager – versus human resources – who will know best how well you will fit the team’s needs and are the most invested in bringing you on board. That person also will be in a position to champion you with human resources and other parties involved in the negotiation.

When you start the conversation with the hiring manager, tell them that you have carefully considered the offer and would like to discuss it. There is no need to use the word “negotiate.” Start on a positive note by expressing interest in the job and sharing a few positives about the offer. Then let them know what falls short. Begin with the salary because it is typically the largest part of the package, and if the hiring manager is unable to match your salary request, she/he might feel more compelled to give more of something else.

Discussing salary
If you are asking for an increased salary, you might want to add some insight on why you think a higher figure is appropriate. Do you have more years of experience than the average new hire or have you experienced standout success in the industry?  If the company is not able to improve the salary, you might want to explore an increase in your performance bonus. It is easier for companies to justify paying you more if you are doing more work. You also can ask for an early salary review.

When discussing salary, the company might ask what you want. Avoid giving a specific figure. Instead, talk in general ranges like “from the mid 80’s to the upper 90’s” to give yourself some flexibility. Stating a specific number could lock you in at that amount when you could have gotten a bit more.

 Don’t be too concerned about taking your requests too far, as the employer will tell you if you have reached a limit. In most cases, keep your requests for further improvement to one or two requests on each point – do not keep going back and forth.

Remember most of negotiating is asking questions or simply sharing your concerns, not making demands. If you raise your points in a professional and polite way, the company will be much more responsive than if you make demands.

Understanding what’s negotiable
Most parts of a compensation package are negotiable. Aside from salary, you can discuss signing and performance bonuses, commissions, vacation, relocation benefits and more. The only two items that are not negotiable for the average employee are health-care benefits and 401(k) retirement plans.

By Kelly McNeil (BSBA ’19)

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Nov 2013
Posts: 77

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Learning to invest – with real money [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Oct 2017, 07:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Learning to invest – with real money
You could spend hours on end theorizing about the value of an investment, but putting it into practice is a different matter altogether.

Image
The Applied Investment Management (AIM) class at UNC Kenan-Flagler allows students to put the concepts they learn in finance class to practice. They get real-life exposure to managing a fund worth more than $2 million.

Here are some of my key takeaways from the AIM class.

Leadership and teamwork
The core values at UNC Kenan-Flagler are in live display in the class. As the fund manager of the energy sector within the fund, I get to lead a team of MBA and Undergraduate Business students that analyzes investments in the space and pitches it to the rest of the class to vote on. It is an incredible opportunity to put these skills to action in real time.

Learning
I can’t emphasize enough the learning aspect this class affords. For me, making an investment in myself by deciding to come back to business school meant that I would challenge myself to grow and learn during my time here at UNC Kenan-Flagler.

Through AIM I have learned about the energy sector and the challenges and opportunities facing it in a particularly volatile and interesting time. I have had conversations with faculty within the energy area to understand different business models within the sector and where the opportunity for the future lies.

Job opportunity
AIM brings in a series of speakers who teach students about analyzing and valuing companies. Every speaker is well established within the industry and can be excellent connections to help secure positions within the investment management industry.

Even if you are not necessarily recruiting within investment management, the ability to strategically think about businesses and value their underlying assets can translate well during an interview. The AIM class helps you build that knowledge expertise and it is an invaluable tool when it comes to recruiting within any industry.

For me, the best part about this class is that it is practical in nature and the students are directly involved in the curriculum being taught. Imagine having that kind of freedom to learn. It happens at UNC Kenan-Flagler and it happens right here in the Applied Investment Management class.

By Luv Sodha (MBA ’18)

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Nov 2013
Posts: 77

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

H&R Block CEO Jeff Jones talks leadership and careers [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Oct 2017, 07:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: H&R Block CEO Jeff Jones talks leadership and careers
Image
Jeff Jones, CEO of H&R Block, gave the keynote address at the 2017 Undergraduate Business Symposium, one of the oldest and largest student-run career development events in the U.S.

With 27 years of industry experience, Jones has plenty of insights into the world students will soon enter. He began his career at advertising firm Leo Burnett before moving on to leadership positions at well-known companies such as The Coca-Cola Company, Gap, Target and Uber.

Being a leader isn’t about being in a position of power.
“Being a leader isn’t about anything more than being that person who’s willing to put themselves out there, willing to learn, willing to make decisions, willing to take initiative” says Jones.

When he considers hiring someone – especially when a recent graduate who has little job experience – he looks for two key qualities: curiosity and initiative.

He believes it is important to find someone who, no matter their academic background, is interested in learning about all facets of the business and curious about things like the decision-making process or how the company makes a profit.

When an applicant does not have much experience, demonstrating initiative goes a long way. It shows that the person isn’t afraid of putting themself out there and it can be a strong indicator of their future success.

Leaders are only as good as their teams.
Although Jones is the CEO of a tax preparation company, he is the first to admit that he is no expert on taxes. So to be an effective leader, Jones relies heavily on the team of people around him.

Since there are many responsibilities associated with being a leader, it is important to surround yourself with people who are experts in their respective fields. They have to be people you trust to get their job done and achieve the results they set out to achieve.

Understanding yourself is key to a successful career.
Your career is likely going to last for close to 50 years, so there is no rush, Jones says. It’s easy to compare yourself to your coworkers and wonder why you didn’t get that promotion or raise. Instead Jones suggests focusing the first 10 years of your career on acquiring as many skills as possible and learning about yourself. Then start applying what you’ve learned to your job and see what happens. Your career should be more about having confidence in yourself and not comparing it to others.

A similar concept applies to being an effective leader. You have to be really clear on who you are and what you value so that you have the confidence to lead yourself before you can effectively lead others. Jones cited his departure from Uber as an example of a decision he had to make based on his values.

Recognize work-life balance won’t always be in balance.
Jones believes that the concept of trying to keep work and life in balance makes it sound like life is good and work is bad. He looks at it from a different perspective.

“When you love what you do then it’s how do I get as much of work and life and not how do I keep them in balance,” says Jones.

However, it is important to recognize that there will be periods of time when one out weighs the other. You have to acknowledge that you’re having a busy week or month and not put too much stress on yourself for that period of time to maintain a work-life balance. If the unbalance persists and there doesn’t seem to be an end in sight, then   reevaluate and make changes.

Don’t change jobs just to escape an unhappy situation.
As someone who has changed jobs a fair number of times, Jones recognizes the importance of that moment when you get a call from a friend or recruiter with a job opportunity. The best time to change jobs is when you are really happy with your current job, he says. You want to be going to something and not running away from a situation.

By Kelly McNeil (BSBA ’19)

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Nov 2013
Posts: 77

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

A class for everyone [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Oct 2017, 08:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: A class for everyone
Just as there are radiologists, neurologists, dermatologists in the medical community, professionals in the real estate community specialize as well.

The UNC Kenan-Flagler Real Estate Club hosted Asset Class Day to introduce first–year MBA students to a variety of asset classes.

From retail and industrial to multi-family, self-storage and office, speakers from top industry companies ventured to McColl Building to share their wisdom – and offer their take on the changing landscape (pun intended!).

Image
Pete Otteni (MBA ’00) of Boston Properties

Pete Otteni (MBA 00’) of Boston Properties opened the day. Operating as a REIT – it must distribute 90 percent of its taxable income to shareholders each year – Boston Properties focuses on Class A offices and notable buildings such as Salesforce Tower. With each property, Otteni and his team weigh a host of questions – from the tenant improvement allowance to what the notice period would be for a tenant wanting to vacate.

Expansion rights – which allow the tenant the option to contract a larger space while simultaneously curbing the owner’s ability to rent it out to other willing tenants in the interim – were discussed.

Otteni’s advice: “Nine out of 10 times on expansion rights, we wish we hadn’t done them.”

Image
Katie Bucklew (BSBA ’05, MAC ’06) of Edens

Katie Bucklew (BSBA 05’, MAC ’06) of Edens’ Washington office introduced the retail asset class sector. Edens looks at communities with 100,000 people making more than $100,000 annually – and then scouts opportunities within a certain radius.

Retail ranges from malls and outlets to lifestyle and power centers (big box retailers). Edens works to diversify tenants and entice foot traffic in their complex. Accordingly, 95 percent of its portfolio has a grocery component – and it uses strategies such as implementing a farmer’s market to bring people to the shopping center. While some offer the future of retail is shaky, Edens believes it is experiencing a transformation.

The event featured a sister act. Kim Bucklew (BSBA 05’, MBA ’11) from Alliance in Atlanta introduced the multi-family asset class. Alliance is a developer of multi-family assets and builds across three categories: garden, mid-rise and high-rise units. Of the three, Alliance believes garden-style is the least risky. Alliance is a merchant builder, which means it builds a property, leases it up, and then sells it. Despite the significant supply of multi-family emerging in many of the markets, Bucklew and Alliance continue to anticipate a demand for this construction in many markets with housing prices out of reach for many target demographics.

Josh Jones of Johnson Development Association introduced the class to the industrial and self-storage space. JDA forecasts significant growth in the last mile distribution centers. Jones and his team often consider the risk between building on spec versus building for a client. They do not forecast the industrial cycle will end soon and have been more comfortable building on spec.

Asset Class Day speakers provided foundational knowledge as well as insights about trends in real estate. And while there is are a variety of other classes in the market, the opportunity to build a base of understanding so early in the academic year was far and away the real asset.

By Martha Morris (MBA ’19)

Image
Kenan-Flagler Real Estate 1Ys

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Nov 2013
Posts: 77

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

A mission to listen [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Oct 2017, 14:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: A mission to listen
Image
One of UNC Kenan-Flagler’s core values is teamwork, which creates an environment of collaboration, mutual support and genuine interest in each other’s success. That value extends beyond the classroom when students team up with classmates to start new ventures.

My classmates in the Weekend Executive MBA Program – a diverse, passionate and talented team of 45 students – are now part of my leadership team in Listen First Project.

My project – to restore civil discourse in America – began on an overnight bus ride between Kampala, Uganda, and Nairobi, Kenya, in 2013. My wife Chrissy – a PhD student in UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public Health – and I had just completed a six-month fellowship in rural Uganda with Samaritan’s Purse, a Christian international relief and development organization.

I had spent the previous five years working in Washington, D.C. – in the U.S. Senate and as a national political consultant conducting voter market and messaging analysis for presidential and statewide campaigns. I left Washington and all its rancorous glory to gain a fresh perspective on life – and I did. I was so looking forward to returning home but was deeply troubled by news that my beloved North Carolina was embroiled in the same vitriol that I’d left behind in D.C.

With a rare opportunity to just sit and reflect on that bus ride, I jotted down my thoughts about the need to listen to each another, especially to those with whom we disagree. In what became the essay “It’s Time to Listen,” I shared my conviction that if we hope for a healthy, prosperous nation, we should not vilify our neighbors when they see the world differently. When I uploaded the essay to my blog from an internet café in Nairobi, I had no idea it would be printed in dozens of newspapers across America – from The News & Observer and The Daily Tar Heel to the Miami Herald and Oklahoman – and reach millions of readers. Encouraged and emboldened by the resonance of such a simple idea, I conceived of the Listen First Project to translate my words into action and make a tangible impact on American culture.

Listen First Project is making progress. My UNC Kenan-Flagler colleagues have rallied to the cause, and thousands of people have signed the Listen First Pledge to fully listen to and consider others’ views before sharing their own, prioritize respect and understanding in conversation, and encourage others to do the same.

What started as a small project has become a Listen First movement to restore civil discourse in America and around the world one conversation at a time. These conversations – from a roundtable of young voters in the Triangle to one among Southern Conservatives and San Francisco Liberals watched by 20,000 on Facebook Live – all grounded in the Listen First Conversation Guidelines, have earned LFP significant national attention. I wrote about these Listen First Conversations for the Huffington Post while New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof shared one of my columns in The Charlotte Observer. I also have hosted several Listen First Conversations on WCHL radio in Chapel Hill.

I founded the national Listen First Coalition of non-profit organizations and individual leaders committed to collaboratively promoting and practicing listening to improve relationships and public discourse. The Listen First message is regularly shared by the National Institute for Civil Discourse, Bridge Alliance and Harvard’s Negotiation & Mediation Clinical Program. We are launching college chapters around the country, including at Carolina.

It’s been incredibly humbling to have leaders and practitioners across the country reach out to discuss the Listen First movement and how we can work together to restore civil discourse in America. The national traction we’re gaining combined with the eager investment in the mission by my UNC Kenan-Flagler family frankly exceeds my wildest dreams and inspired me, following the Charlottesville tragedy, to quit my job and invest myself full time in Listen First.

Listen First Project is about much more than political discourse. It’s easy for us to point the finger at Washington, but our failure to listen is harming our relationships and culture in every area, including the family dinner table, neighborhood, classroom and business world.

Compromise isn’t always the answer. The point is not agreement, but gaining a new understanding and respect for alternative views and those who hold them, moving beyond slander and seeking common ground.



By Pearce Godwin (EMBA ‘18)

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Nov 2013
Posts: 77

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

MAC student perspectives: Community Service Day [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Oct 2017, 18:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: MAC student perspectives: Community Service Day
Image

Last Friday, our students, staff, and faculty from the Master of Accounting Program joined hands and volunteered with the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina. This organization has one goal: “No One Goes Hungry in Central & Eastern North Carolina”. In order to achieve this goal, the food bank receives, sorts, and distributes over 70 million pounds of food annually to people in need, but they can’t do it alone.

So, last Friday, we sent volunteers in to help with the sorting process. As a team, we sorted 17 pallets of apples, potatoes, and zucchini – making over 14,315 meals for people in need.

This event — fun for all of us — also shows how our class exhibits leadership in both the classroom and industry while doing our part in the community and helping to make sure that no one goes hungry.

by Allie Halter, MAC ’18

>> Learn more about the UNC MAC student experience

 

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Nov 2013
Posts: 77

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

A mission to listen [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Oct 2017, 21:01
FROM Kenan Flagler Executive MBA Blog: A mission to listen
Image
One of UNC Kenan-Flagler’s core values is teamwork, which creates an environment of collaboration, mutual support and genuine interest in each other’s success. That value extends beyond the classroom when students team up with classmates to start new ventures.

My classmates in the Weekend Executive MBA Program – a diverse, passionate and talented team of 45 students – are now part of my leadership team in Listen First Project.

My project – to restore civil discourse in America – began on an overnight bus ride between Kampala, Uganda, and Nairobi, Kenya, in 2013. My wife Chrissy – a PhD student in UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public Health – and I had just completed a six-month fellowship in rural Uganda with Samaritan’s Purse, a Christian international relief and development organization.

I had spent the previous five years working in Washington, D.C. – in the U.S. Senate and as a national political consultant conducting voter market and messaging analysis for presidential and statewide campaigns. I left Washington and all its rancorous glory to gain a fresh perspective on life – and I did. I was so looking forward to returning home but was deeply troubled by news that my beloved North Carolina was embroiled in the same vitriol that I’d left behind in D.C.

With a rare opportunity to just sit and reflect on that bus ride, I jotted down my thoughts about the need to listen to each another, especially to those with whom we disagree. In what became the essay “It’s Time to Listen,” I shared my conviction that if we hope for a healthy, prosperous nation, we should not vilify our neighbors when they see the world differently. When I uploaded the essay to my blog from an internet café in Nairobi, I had no idea it would be printed in dozens of newspapers across America – from The News & Observer and The Daily Tar Heel to the Miami Herald and Oklahoman – and reach millions of readers. Encouraged and emboldened by the resonance of such a simple idea, I conceived of the Listen First Project to translate my words into action and make a tangible impact on American culture.

Listen First Project is making progress. My UNC Kenan-Flagler colleagues have rallied to the cause, and thousands of people have signed the Listen First Pledge to fully listen to and consider others’ views before sharing their own, prioritize respect and understanding in conversation, and encourage others to do the same.

What started as a small project has become a Listen First movement to restore civil discourse in America and around the world one conversation at a time. These conversations – from a roundtable of young voters in the Triangle to one among Southern Conservatives and San Francisco Liberals watched by 20,000 on Facebook Live – all grounded in the Listen First Conversation Guidelines, have earned LFP significant national attention. I wrote about these Listen First Conversations for the Huffington Post while New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof shared one of my columns in The Charlotte Observer. I also have hosted several Listen First Conversations on WCHL radio in Chapel Hill.

I founded the national Listen First Coalition of non-profit organizations and individual leaders committed to collaboratively promoting and practicing listening to improve relationships and public discourse. The Listen First message is regularly shared by the National Institute for Civil Discourse, Bridge Alliance and Harvard’s Negotiation & Mediation Clinical Program. We are launching college chapters around the country, including at Carolina.

It’s been incredibly humbling to have leaders and practitioners across the country reach out to discuss the Listen First movement and how we can work together to restore civil discourse in America. The national traction we’re gaining combined with the eager investment in the mission by my UNC Kenan-Flagler family frankly exceeds my wildest dreams and inspired me, following the Charlottesville tragedy, to quit my job and invest myself full time in Listen First.

Listen First Project is about much more than political discourse. It’s easy for us to point the finger at Washington, but our failure to listen is harming our relationships and culture in every area, including the family dinner table, neighborhood, classroom and business world.

Compromise isn’t always the answer. The point is not agreement, but gaining a new understanding and respect for alternative views and those who hold them, moving beyond slander and seeking common ground.



By Pearce Godwin (EMBA ‘18)

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Nov 2013
Posts: 77

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Should the NFL have punted on protests? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Oct 2017, 17:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Should the NFL have punted on protests?
Image
If you are looking for yet another article discussing who is in the right about the NFL protests (the president, the NFL, the players, liberals or conservatives), feel free to stop reading now.

If you are interested what brand managers can learn from national anthem dustup to better manage their brands, stay with me.

How we got here

Let’s begin with a little background and a quick recap of what happened. The protest issue began back in August 2016 when San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick sat for the national anthem. He revealed his rationale in an interview after the game: “I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color. To me, this is bigger than football and it would be selfish on my part to look the other way. There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder.” The reaction was mixed, with some supporting his right to protest and his position and others criticizing him for his stance.

A few other NFL players followed suit, but over the off-season Kaepernick left the 49ers as a free agent. No other teams picked him up, fueling speculation that no NFL owners wanted the controversy that accompanied him. As the new NFL season began a few weeks ago the issue seemed to have died out until President Trump called on NFL owners to fire players who would not stand for the anthem, “Get that son of a bitch off the field right now, he’s fired. He’s fired!” The NFL commissioner and owners responded with statements and other communications criticizing the president’s comments, calling them “divisive” and “disrespectful, saying they are united with their players and support their right to protest. Some owners went further, appearing on the field with their teams to lock arms and/or kneel during games.

Teams also took action, either staying in their locker rooms during the anthem, locking arms, kneeling or finding other ways to protest. Some asked fans to not do the usual hand-on-the-heart stance but to lock arms as well (few did). And individually more than 100 players protested in some way during NFL games the following week, by sitting, kneeling or raising their fists.

Fans have expressed mixed reactions in social media, but at the stadiums, at home watching TV and in polls, it seems clear the NFL’s steps did not help the brand. Already suffering rating declines last year and battling negative publicity around domestic violence, brain injuries and player run-ins with the law, this controversy came at an already difficult time for a brand that was long seen as golden and tightly tied to the fabric of America.

In response to the players’ protests on the field fans in the stands booed their teams, chanted “USA! USA!” or refused to support requests to lock arms themselves. At home fans tuned out of NFL games, contributing to a ratings decline for the league and subscribers of DirectTV’s NFL Sunday Ticket asking for refunds.

While only a couple small NFL sponsors have backed out, the impact of backlash is recognized in the NFL and beyond. Budweiser said it planned to continue its NFL sponsorship, but has provided a hotline for fans to comment on the controversy. Others have remained mum or tried to straddle the issue. And the NBA, seeking to avoid the NFL’s problem, has made it clear it expects its players to stand for the anthem.

Polls taken after the recent protests show the impact as well. In a CBS poll most fans, while they also think Trump’s comments were wrong and that players have a right to protest, disapprove of the player protests (52%). Another poll finds 64% feel “NFL players should stand and be respectful during the national anthem” while just 24% disagree and that 80% of fans want less politics mixed in with their sports. In another poll the net favorability ratings for the NFL fell from 30% to 17%. Lastly, a poll shows that 34% percent of fans say they are less likely to watch the NFL less due to the protests.

Given the data and the responses from fans, my analysis is that the NFL’s actions in response to Trump’s comments and tweets have not added positive brand equity to the NFL Shield. It appears the league has recognized this as they called a meeting of the owners and some players to discuss the protests and next steps. Unfortunately for the brand, it does not appear the NFL has developed a unified message and future position.

What the NFL got right – and got wrong

Obviously the NFL had to respond to Trump’s comments about the players, but it could have done so in a more rational way with a view towards the long term. Instead, likely due to the emotional impact of the president’s statements and the antipathy many feel towards him, they overreacted without thinking through the implications.

The NFL was right to support its players and their right to protest. To be clear, as Americans the players have the right to protest on their own time but the NFL could discipline them for doing so on the field if it chose to do so – however, it rightly chose not to. However, having the league and every owner put out statements calling the president “divisive” followed by coordinated protests on the field overplayed the NFL’s hand.

It would have been better if the league put out a short statement stating it disagrees with the president, supports its players and celebrates the country, the military and every citizen’s right to protest for us as a nation to form a more perfect union. From there the NFL should have continued on as before – allowing players who wanted to protest to do so but not having teams take a coordinated stance. Now, after taking such a hard stance, where does the NFL go? Did they think beyond last week as to what happens next and what actions they should take collectively or individually for the rest of the many games to come? It doesn’t appear so.

The latest episode in the saga is a letter from NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell to the team, which states that teams need to stand for the anthem. We will see if that settles the issue but, given the passions raised on both sides, it seems doubtful.

At this point you might think, “But leaders need to take a stand to protect their brands!” My point is not that they shouldn’t, but that they should choose their battles – and fight them well. Humans are a visual species so what fans see totally overpowers what players say. Seeing the players’ actions during the national anthem elicits a visceral reaction among many fans – and a significant number feel they are being forced to choose between their flag or the NFL. It should be obvious who will lose in that equation.

By the way, if your response to the above is “the flag is just a symbol,” you need to turn in your marketing card right now because flags and brands are both symbols and you should know the power humans invest in symbols. If you don’t then you don’t understand branding.

The NFL had other options. Rather than enable protests during the anthem it could have created special helmet stickers for players who wanted to wear them to signify their protest. Or it could have created a platform for players to discuss the issue off the field during a press conference. Or taking a page from the Indianapolis Colts, it could have created a “Fund for Equality” to “promote equality, improve relationships between law enforcement and the community and provide opportunities for minorities.”

Lessons for other brands

In an era in which organizations might find their brands in conflict with the current president’s bully pulpit, here are a few things to consider:

  • Don’t overreact – de-escalate. In the heat of the moment, when you are feeling attacked (and might heartily dislike the current occupant of the Oval Office), it’s easy to respond emotionally instead of logically. It’s better to respond in a way that both makes your point and de-escalates the issue. Brands in the U.S. operate in a hyper-polarized political environment and over-reacting can lead to turning more than 50% of consumers against your brand. Is the short-term satisfaction of a sharp response to the Commander-in-Chief worth the long-term problems that come along with it, especially when he will likely move on to another target in a few days?
  • The visual trumps the spoken word (pun intended). If a picture is worth a thousand words than a symbol like the flag is worth billions. Company leaders can make all the statements they want, but if the visual image it gives off contradicts it, the brand will lose every time.
  • Have an exit plan. Before responding think through the implications of your actions. War-game out some possible first, second and third effects of different strategies and tactics you might use. Then weed out dead-ends, focus on those with potential and figure out how you will move off the issue and back to messages you want consumers to associate with your brand.
Nordstrom is an example of a brand that both de-escalated the situation and had an exit plan. When the retail store dropped Ivanka Trump’s brand the president tweeted, “My daughter Ivanka has been treated so unfairly,” Mr. Trump said on his personal Twitter account. “She is a great person – always pushing me to do the right thing! Terrible!”

Nordstrom’s made no comment on the president’s statement and explained the reason for dropping the brand was not political but due to flagging sales. As a result of this approach Nordstrom emerged relatively unscathed by the exchange and the president moved on to other things.

While now is a challenging time for brands, it is possible to still live up to what your brand stands for and not turn consumers into opponents. But to do so you need to step back, get perspective and develop a game plan that will get your brand through the crisis and back on track.

By Mark McNeilly, professor of the practice of marketing at UNC Kenan-Flagler

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 0

Should the NFL have punted on protests?   [#permalink] 18 Oct 2017, 17:00

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3   [ 56 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

UNC Kenan-Flagler MBA Admissions and Related blogs

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.