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UNC Kenan-Flagler MBA Admissions and Related blogs

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What makes an effective global leader?  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Dec 2018, 09:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: What makes an effective global leader?
Image
Mabel Miguel

Business leaders need more than technical skills to be effective in a global market – they also need emotional and cultural intelligence.

Mabel Miguel, professor of organizational behavior and director of theGlobal Business Center at UNC Kenan-Flagler, focuses on global education, inclusive global leadership, and teaching students how to succeed globally.

“At the beginning of your career you get hired because of your technical skills but as your career progresses, the soft skills differentiate you,” Miguel says. Soft skills include attitude, self-management capabilities, and the ability to empathize and build relationships. They are the ingredients for effective global leadership.

Attitude is everything

Miguel says attitude is a multiplier. Business leaders should ask themselves, “Is my attitude open? Is it respectful? Is it resilient?” People who answer yes are more inclined to make the most of any and every experience and opportunity.

Part of developing your attitude is exploring and understanding other cultures. Miguel suggests leaders need to be able to interact with and motivate people from different cultures, whether they travel the world, lead virtually or work with diverse teams at home. She says staying open-minded and soaking in new ways of thinking is not only exciting, but key to effective leadership

“Effective global leaders are able to say, ‘This is the way I would do it, this is the way you would do it – together, let’s create a third way,’” Miguel says. In the process, people gain new insights and practices from others.

Managing yourself first

In a global business environment, management capabilities go farther than managing employees. Leaders need to be able to manage themselves. The key is knowing who you are, says Miguel.

“You need to be self-aware so you can manage yourself. Only then are you in a position to understand and manage other people,” Miguel says. “You need to understand what skills you bring to the table. You need understand your values and style.”

If you understand who you are, it will help with managing yourself and others.

“We have so many facets to who we are. Of all of the things you can know about yourself, at the minimum, is your personal style of communicating and leading, values, culture and skillset. That is the foundation for self-awareness,” Miguel says.

Image
UNC Kenan-Flagler’s Global Education Model

Great leaders are able to identify their values and personal style while understanding the same of others. Effective global leaders are able to work with people of different backgrounds, knowing that their perspectives and behaviors are influenced by their cultures and values and are just as important as the leaders’ own. Good leaders withhold judgement of people from different cultures and don’t assume that because they might have different values and approaches that their contributions are not as productive.

“When you work with people who are different from you and believe different things, our knee-jerk reaction is to judge them as wrong,” Miguel says. But effective global leaders are able to listen and see things from another person’s perspective without judgment.

Relationships matter

Showing empathy and being able to connect and build relationships with clients and employees are other factors that make great global leaders more effective.

Americans tend to prioritize the work at hand over building quality relationships, she says.

“Many parts of the world are relationship-oriented, which means they prioritize building the relationship before accomplishing the task,” Miguel says. In other parts of the world, companies and corporations want to get to know the person they’ll be working with.

“That kind of relationship building is essential to task accomplishment,” Miguel says. Having strong working relationships allows for the acceptance of new ideas and opinions. “You can learn by watching people,” she says, understanding how they succeed even when their priority is the relationship.

“We learn from what we see, read and hear. That is also true for effective global leaders and what we apply in the inclusive global leadership development for our students. ”
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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Becoming an expert  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Dec 2018, 13:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Becoming an expert
Image

The best advice I got before
business school was to become “the expert” on something so my classmates would
come to me for anything related to that topic. The advice giver was a recent
MBA graduate whose expertise was in real estate development, and he said that
former classmates still came to him when thinking about buying a home.

I trust him, and the advice made
sense, so I tried to think on the singular thing that excited me most for my
MBA. The conclusion I came to: everything. I wanted to be “the expert” on
everything.

Many might call me cocky (and many
already do), but there was logic behind this decision. I didn’t actually think
that I would be the expert in any one thing – there are too many brilliant and
hard-working people here for that. Instead I would be an expert on UNC
Kenan-Flagler and all it has to offer. I figured that no student could truly
experience every opportunity within the School. I am not arrogant enough to
think that I could come close – but I was arrogant enough to try.

 Joining clubs? Sign
me up. Volunteer organizations? Of course. Different concentrations? Makes
sense. You name it, I was there. Academic, social, extracurricular, recruiting,
the works.

Most people claim to want
to get the most of their two years here, and I was no different. As I’ve said
to the prospective students on the countless tours I’ve given, I believe there
are five areas into which an MBA can really dive while at school: academics,
recruiting, the Triangle, extracurriculars and social.

Typically I end that list
by saying I dove into extracurriculars, but that’s not a complete answer.

I also have focused on
academics more than I needed, spent too much time obsessing over recruiting,
visited the local spots, and still made time to sing karaoke with my classmates
most Wednesdays. Not everyone can do it, and many don’t want to, but I’m
evidence that some people can come close to having it all.

After attempting to fill
my plate as much as I could during my first year, this year’s crop of
first-year MBA students have asked me how I did it all and, unfortunately, I
still don’t have a great answer. I simply tried to do everything I could.

I did not live a
particularly exceptional life before coming to UNC Kenan-Flagler. I did not
save the lives of countless others, I did not work at a Fortune 500 company,
and I did not have a driving passion that shaped my life, all of which various
classmates have done or had.

Instead, I bounced around
companies, working in three different industries in my five years since
graduating from college, where my GPA was good but not great. My college time
was filled with diving deep into two activities, so why should business school
be any different?

There honestly isn’t a
great answer to it beyond that I wanted to live my best life while here. And if
that’s all I had to say about my time here, it’d be exactly that: I lived my
best life while here.

By Alex Cooper (MBA ’19)

Editor’s note: So what has
Alex Cooper been doing – aside from taking a more-than-full course load – since
he arrived at UNC Kenan-Flagler in August 2017? You’ll find a sampling below.
After graduation he will work as a consultant at Boston Consulting Group in
Atlanta.

  • KenanScholar at the Frank Hawkins
    Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise
  • Concentrations in marketing and operations; Enrichment concentration
    in entrepreneurship
  • MBA Student Association: VP of Finance
  • Entrepreneurshipand Venture Capital Club:
    Executive VP and Liaison for New Venture Creation
  • Adam Smith Society: President
  • Blockchain Club: Co-founder and VP of University Relations
  • Consensys Blockchain Venture Competition: Semi-Finalist
  • Career Mentor for the Undergraduate Business Program
  • Teaching assistant for Financial Tools, Marketing and Sales
    courses; tutor
  • VentureCapital Investment Competition (VCIC):
    Fellow
  • NonprofitBoard Program: Consultant
  • VC/Angel Program
  • IBM Mentorship Program
  • MBA Ambassador
  • Legacy Cup: Tillman Legacy Captain
  • Volunteer: YES Consortium UNC Darkside assistant coach and blood
    drive
  • Career clubs: Technology Club liaison for recruiting and member of the Consulting,
    Marketing, General Management and Operations Management Clubs 
  • Activity clubs: Beer Society, Golf Club and Wine Club
  • UNC Intramural Street Hockey: Champion
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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Make your mark in the future of tech  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jan 2019, 14:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Make your mark in the future of tech
Image

The
technology industry is male dominated, but as the industry has grown, so has
the involvement of women. At the 2018 Carolina Womenin Business Conference, four women in the technology industry shared
their experiences and advice to those wanting to break into the industry.

Miriam
McLemore (BSBA ’85), director of enterprise, strategy, and evangelism at Amazon,
moderated the panel of Katy Sutter (BSBA ’82), client director at IBM; Leslie
Pearce (MBA ’90), vice president of inside sales at First Data; and Bridget
Wamsley (MBA ’17), marketing manager at Cisco.

Together
the women discussed changes in the tech industry, the importance of networking,
and the reality of work-life balance.

Changes in tech industry

One of
the biggest changes in the tech industry, says McLemore, is that today every
company is, in a sense, a tech company. “You can’t run a business without
technology today,” she says. “I had Delta Airlines as an account, and they
can’t fly airplanes without technology. Almost every company is leveraging
technology more and more.”

Another
major change is the pace at which work is performed. In the past a team planned
to roll out a new product or service in three to five years, says McLemore. Now,
teams have more like 12 to 18 months for a rollout and only six months for some
cycles. The turnaround on a project is fast, but the fast pace keeps the work
exciting.

“You
don’t do the job every month, which is very exciting. I love technology just
from the perspective of you don’t know what tomorrow is going to bring and you
have to remain committed to knowing what’s going on in the industry,” says Pearce.

Work-life balance

The
fast pace of the technology industry raises the question of whether a work-life
balance is possible. McLemore answered without hesitation that based on her
personal experience it is very possible. “You actually can do these jobs and
have a family. I have three children and I’ve been married for 25 years. Katy’s
got two children and been married for 30 years.”

McLemore
explains that balancing a family and work isn’t always easy, but with all of
the resources and technology available today, maintaining a balance is much
easier. A shift in work culture has also helped. McLemore reminisced about a
time when she had to show up to work at 8 a.m. in a starched shirt, skirt and
heels. Now she wears jeans and tennis shoes every day. 

Networking

“Relationships
are extremely important, so keeping connections and building your network is so
crucial. The technology world used to be smaller than it is today, but it’s
still fairly small,” says Sutter. “You’d be amazed. Every day I’m still running
into people that I knew 20 years ago.”

Wamsley
offered advice for building a network. When she started at Cisco, she made
goals for herself and kept track of who she had met and who interested her. She
approaches colleagues to seek their insights and learn about their experiences.
So far no one has turned her down.

Building
relationships is key. “Genuinely help them with something because networking
for the sake of networking to me feels artificial,” says McLemore. “I get a lot
of that in this role. If you can do something that helps someone else, that
builds a relationship and that’s what you’re actually trying to achieve.”

By Kelly McNeil (BSBA ’19)
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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Having a lasting impact through entrepreneurship  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jan 2019, 06:00
FROM Kenan- Flagler Admissions Blog: Having a lasting impact through entrepreneurship
Image

As a teenager in high school, Vickie Gibbs (MBA ’98) knew she wanted to start her own business.

“I don’t like being in a box,” Gibbs says. She had a strong desire to be her own boss and be as creative as possible.

With that entrepreneurial mindset, Gibbs was the perfect person to serve as executive director for the Business School’s Entrepreneurship Center.

Gibbs earned her MBA through the School’s full-time program, so she’s familiar with campus and the buzz of students working on start-ups and other projects.

“It’s nice being back in the community. Being around students definitely gives you that energy and feeling of being hungry to learn,” Gibbs says. “There’s that excitement that comes from lifelong learning here.”

Gibbs earned her undergraduate degree in electrical engineering from Duke University. Her alma mater and UNC were both on her radar when she decided to earn her MBA. She was married at the time, and wanted to stay local.

“I knew that UNC Kenan-Flagler was really strong in marketing and had just started to do more in entrepreneurship, which was new at the time. That was interesting to me,” Gibbs says. After coming to Chapel Hill for her on-campus interview and site visit, her decision was made.

“The community and the general vibe about everything were really amazing and I could tell that everything was very connected, everyone was willing to help each other,” she says. “Overwhelmingly I said, ‘This is where I want to be.’”

The sense of community extends to alumni and Gibbs compliments the School’s efforts to keep them involved.

“Shortly after I graduated, I came back and spoke at classes and judged events. That brought more connections to other alumni and students, growing my network of people,” Gibbs says. “The Business School and Entrepreneurship Center both work to keep alumni engaged, informed and included.”

Gibbs brings more than 20 years of experience with entrepreneurial ventures to the center. Her career has included jobs at high-tech startups including OpenSite, Art.com and Motricity as well as stints with Viacom / MTV Networks and Capitol Broadcasting Company before founding Marlow Consulting Group.

Gibbs learned valuable lessons at each company, but one scenario stood out to her.

Gibbs and her best friend were working at Art.com, an online retail company. They both loved the idea of producing a physical product, and had an idea of creating an actual store, thinking it would be the same as online retail, but they quickly learned they were wrong.

“Being a successful entrepreneur, you have this combination of humility and hubris. You don’t know everything but you’re convinced you can figure it out,” Gibbs says. After their store had been open for four years, they had to close it.

“Sometimes the greatest learnings come from experiences that are considered failures. We launched a business and had to close it, but learned so much from that experience. One of those lessons was not being afraid of trying something new and failing. Those failures can turn into something positive, potentially a life-changing career”, Gibbs says.

Learning from mistakes and being adaptable has helped Gibbs in her leadership roles and will certainly guide her in her new role with the UNC Kenan-Flagler Entrepreneurship Center.

“I am a servant leader. I feel that we’re all one team, and even though I might be the leader of a team, we’re all in it together. It takes all of the pieces to make things successful. By serving others, we serve the greater good,” Gibbs explains.

But before becoming an entrepreneur, Gibbs used her background in electrical engineering to land her first job at Mitsubishi Semiconductor as a hardware design engineer. Being a woman in STEM, tech and entrepreneurship, Gibbs has advice for other women who want to follow a similar career path.

“Don’t be afraid of anything. You are completely capable,” Gibbs says. “Don’t be intimidated just because there are not a lot of women around. Sometimes you just have to be bold and go for it,” Gibbs explains. Being a woman in business and tech has disadvantages and advantages.

“I get remembered a lot more. It gives you an opportunity to stand out,” she says.

And when disadvantages arise, Gibbs relies on her circle of friends. She says it’s important for women in business to maintain a cohort of female colleagues and peers who you can rely on. It has helped Gibbs professionally and personally.

“We talk about work, we talk about fun stuff and we also support each other as we encounter challenges,” Gibbs says. They also share successes. Gibbs helped pilot a program at Duke, DTech, for women in technical fields to help them develop a sense of community with their female peers. “It’s been life changing for some of those young women who are graduating and getting jobs.”

Gibbs loves seeing potential in others, coaching them and giving them the opportunity to learn and pushing them outside of their comfort zones. Some people who have worked with Gibbs are now VPs of top brands like Nickelodeon and Sephora.

“One of the main drivers for coming back to UNC Kenan-Flagler at the Entrepreneurship Center is to have a larger impact in a broader way,” she says. Gibbs praises Ted Zoller for the success and growth of the center. She wanted to work with him and take the center to the next level. One challenge she hopes to tackle is diversity.

“Diversity in entrepreneurship is a challenge. No one’s really figured it out yet and I would love to make progress with the Entrepreneurship Center — figure out how companies can do it better and how we can do it better. It’s a big problem to solve,” Gibbs explains.

Her goal is to always have a lasting impact where ever she can. In addition to her new role with the Entrepreneurship Center, she’s also working with the Street Hope Foundation in Kenya. The organization supports women who are in survival prostitution, which is when homeless or disadvantage people trade sex for food, a place to sleep or other basic needs.

“We’re teaching them life skills and job skills. To watch life-changing impact is really amazing,” Gibbs says.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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Having a lasting impact through entrepreneurship &nbs [#permalink] 07 Jan 2019, 06:00

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