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Stanford MBA Admissions & Related Blogs

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Re: Stanford MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 13 Mar 2017, 14:32
By Adam Hoff, Amerasia Consulting Group
Time for another edition of Monday MBA Resource, where we share the things we are reading, watching, and listening to that might be helpful to people in the MBA community.  Some are more focused on applicants, others are better for students, some for both - but all of them offer great insights that are worth soaking up.
Three weeks ago we broke down the Knowledge @Wharton podcast and people seem to really be enjoying it.  Two weeks ago it was one of my favorite articles in years: "Happy Ambition: Striving for Success, Avoiding Status Cocaine, and Prioritizing Happiness" by Ben Casnocha.  Last week was The Charisma Myth by Olivia Fox. Let's hope we can keep it up with this next entry, which is this blog post:

How to Prepare for and Rock a Behavioral Job Interview by Brett and Kate McKay.
WHO WROTE IT:[/b]
Brett and Kate McKay started the "Art of Manliness" blog back in 2008, which has turned into a full-scale industry with over 6 million hits a month on their website, a popular podcast, and more.  They created the site as a response to what they felt was a lack of information about how to "grow up" and become a well-rounded person.  The site may feel aimed at men (given the title), but there is great advice all over the place and I would recommend at least giving the podcast a listen.

Link to the podcast.

Article about Brett and Kate McKay.
WHAT IT'S ABOUT: [/b]
This particular post is about a "behavioral interview" in the job space.  Brett talks about the first time he faced down such a task and how different it was from the usual fluff interviews.  He talks about why companies use them, the myriad questions you might face (his piece includes a link to over 100 behavioral questions), and how to structure a response.  A lot of what he suggests mirrors the exact advice I give my MBA clients to prep them for their own behavioral interviews and I somehow found this more interesting and helpful because it was about job interviews (where the stakes usually feel even higher because there is often just one position), rather than the same tired info about MBA interviews that I see out there.

WHO IT BENEFITS: 
Anyone doing a behavioral interview, obviously.  As for the MBA crowd, it is going to be especially helpful to people going through their b-school interviews right now.  Specifically:

MIT Sloan candidates - MIT famously uses a behavioral approach to interviewing and this blog post is probably the best prep you could do for it.[/*]
Other b-school candidates - Even schools that don't focus on behavioral will almost always get a few questions into the mix.  Some do it on purpose, for the theoretical reasons covered in the post and some do it on accident, just seeing that those are "good interview questions."  Either way, you are sure to see a few of these as you embark upon the MBA interview circuit.[/*]
[/list]
 
If you are looking help with your applications, please email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com.  We have seen what the competition is doing and we can say without a doubt that we go deeper, more strategic, and generate better results with our methods.  Line up a call and find out for yourself.

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Re: Stanford MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 14 Mar 2017, 04:13
By Adam Hoff, Amerasia Consulting Group
The common myth surrounding Round 3 of the MBA application process is that you can't, or shouldn't, apply late in the admission cycle.
"The class is pretty much full" is one refrain.  "You have to be a truly unique applicant" is another.  "Only European programs admit people that late" is yet another. As with anything, there are bits of truth in these sound bites ... but only bits.

LET'S WORK THROUGH THOSE THREE STATEMENTS:
1. THE CLASS IS PRETTY MUCH FULL. 
There are a few ways to look at this.  The first is to say that Round 1 and Round 2 make up the biggest segment of an incoming class.  That is definitely true.  However, the other way to examine the timing of all this is to note that in many cases, Round 3 applicants arrive before Round 2 admissions decisions are made.  This is done for an obvious reason, which is to generate enough wiggle room in case Rd 3 applicants come in and trump the people who are about to be admitted.  So the class is probably just about full ... but a lot of decisions are pending, in case some great people flood in late.  Which leads us to...

2. YOU HAVE TO BE UNIQUE TO GET IN.
This is not true at all.  Or, to put it another way, you only have to be as unique as you would have had to be in a previous round.  It's not an exotic species contest.  What IS relevant is whether you are A) qualified, and B) what the class mix needs.  There is no way to predict the second part, of course, but you can certainly take stock of the first bit.  A flier in Round 3 is probably not a great way to work through a low GMAT score, but if you have a good profile, you may be exactly what an MBA program needs.  Maybe School X is light on females, or marketers, or Canadians.  You never know.  So you don't have to be "unique" so much as qualified and something they might need more of in the class.

3. ONLY EUROPEAN PROGRAMS ADMIT THIS LATE.
This one is a bit of a trick statement, because programs in Europe DO tend to admit quite late.  But we throw in the "only" to once again state that many U.S. programs keep a sharp eye and/or hold back spots for the later rounds.
OKAY, SO NOW THAT WE KNOW THERE IS ACTUALLY A CHANCE, WHAT DO YOU NEED TO DO?  FOUR CRITICAL THINGS:
1. CONSIDER THE REAPPLICATION PROCESS[/b].
Even with our rose-colored glasses, we still admit that the odds are longer for late rounds, which means you want to be thinking of the reapplication process for those schools.  Because the time frame will be shortened between Rd 3 of this year and Rd 1 of next year, you have to really think about what you are doing.  Does the school in question let you submit a new application or just a reapplicant question?  If it is the latter, you want to make sure that enough "stuff" can happen over the next seven months for you to write about in a "what have you done since your last application" question.  If you won't have the ammo there, you may want to hold off on that program.  If they do accept new applications though, you can fire away for Round 3 and even strengthen your stated interest in the program.
2. SUBMIT PERFECTION.
If you are eyeing reapplication, you still have to nail the essays and the entire application this time around.  Why?  Because you are creating a permanent record and file at that school.  Even if it is unlikely that your admissions officer will pull up both applications on the first lap around, there is a good chance that at some point, they will want to see how your goals evolved, if you have learned more about the program, are more self aware, etc.  So if you are going to seek help from an expert, do it now, before you leave one of this smeared hand prints in the concrete and live to regret it. (Note: we minimize the risk for our Round 3 clients, which you can read about below.)
3. EXPLAIN YOURSELF.
If you are applying late, explain why.  You should be hitting "why now for an MBA" anyway, so really nail it here.  Tell the reader why this is coming in the door now instead of five months ago.  Put them at ease.  Don't let them think you are firing off a panic application just because you got dinged at six other schools.  Speaking of...
4. FIGURE OUT AMENABLE SCHOOLS BY LOOKING DOWNSTREAM.
You can sometimes guess which schools are most open to Round 3 applicants by looking for "downstream" programs.  What we mean by that is a school that might get some great late arriving candidates who were dinged or waitlisted at higher ranked programs.  Many candidates are either short on time or overly ambitious and so they might only apply to a few schools in Rd 1 or Rd 2, leaving them with no options and a last-minute game plan for Round 3.  Examples include UCLA Anderson (downstream from Stanford GSB), Darden (downstream from Harvard), Texas (downstream from MIT and Haas for tech), Duke (downstream from Kellogg), and Cornell (downstream from a lot of schools).  These programs may be sensitive about this, so make sure to have really excellent reasons for applying late (beyond, "I got dinged at GSB") and make sure to nail school fit, but you are going to find that these programs probably have a few more slots saved than a place like HBS.

 

If you need help with Round 3 - either comprehensively or just stress testing your essays to make sure they hit the mark - email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com.

The arms race for consulting help usually starts in April for Round 1 of the next year, but the best value is probably right now.  You can get more distance from the field in Round 3 than at any other time and the quality of your work will make a huge difference.

To demonstrate our commitment to doing Round 3 right, we have a very unique policy: work with us on a comprehensive package for the late round and we will help you reapply to the same schools free of charge in the fall, should it come to that.

View our "Round 3 Guarantee" for complete details.

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Re: Stanford MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 23 Mar 2017, 10:11
[caption id="attachment_36534" align="aligncenter" width="300"]Image
Getting an MBA while the world falls apart[/caption]
There are times when things feel so crazy, out of control, and even hopeless that our own individual pursuits start to feel trivial, selfish, and even misguided.[/b]
I can remember vivid moments over the past 10 years where I had a distinct feeling of living the wrong life, given what was going on around me.  When the financial collapse took hold in 2009, I thought to myself "why did I leave corporate law - where I could be part of the solution - to instead help people apply to business school right in the teeth of a recession?"  Just this past winter I watched "Making a Murderer" on Netflix and kicked myself for not remaining a lawyer ... but this time not a corporate lawyer, but instead a constitutional attorney like the individuals portrayed early in that documentary series.  And now, as police/citizen animus and race problems in America reach a peak, as the EU teeters, as [seriously, enter any of a dozen paralyzing issues] I sometimes am not even sure what I should be doing.  But I do know it doesn't feel like enough; it feels to insular and self-absorbed and small.  But then it occurred to me: I bet a lot of people feel that way, including my past and present clients pursuing an MBA.  So let's talk about that.

How do you lock in your focus and devote everything you have to a task like "getting an MBA" when the macro problems in the world feel so seismic and crushing?  I think it's worth analyzing this from both the perspective of applying to and then attending business school, because they are different aspects of the same end goal.
ATTENDING BUSINESS SCHOOL AMIDST CHAOS[/b]
I'm starting here because attending business school is likely to be the phase of the process where these macro issues are going to flood your world.  Class discussions are going to center around issues like Brexit and Trump, hallways chatter will grapple with Black Lives Matter and the militarization of local police departments, and affinity groups will no doubt wrestle with social media nearly as much (if not as much) as real life.  Your MBA life will be surrounded and engulfed with real life, because the days of going off to a leafy campus to disconnect from Planet Earth for two years ... well, those days are over.
WHAT DO YOU DO WITH THIS REALITY?  
My advice, honestly, is to take a step back from it.  It's great to be around other young, smart, driven, passionate people and to be on a college campus, where issues have a way of becoming causes.  However, you also invested two years and probably 150K to get a professional degree that was part of a long-term plan of attack.  What was that plan when you started?  What does it look like now?  Be sure to constantly step back from the crowds and the emotions of your experiences to analyze your entire life, your interests, and your goals.  Make your moves - not just what job to take, but what classes to take, what clubs to join, how you spend your time, etc. - based on that big-picture plan and not what is spiking the blood pressure of people around you.  In a Twitter world, in a world where Donald Freaking Trump is the Republican nominee, in a world of protests, it is easy to pursue paths that "feel" right (whether because of your moral compass or the "street cred" points you pick up in the process), but aren't actually right for you.

Others may disagree with me on this, but having gone to an elite graduate school and been swept up in such things myself (only to land in a hedge fund law group of which I never planned to participate in), I learned the hard way that grad school is not College, The Sequel - you are investing in your career.  Just don't lose sight of that.

APPLYING TO BUSINESS SCHOOL AMIDST CHAOS
Okay, so if my advice for attending an MBA program is to stay focused and to keep a cool remove from the waves on campus, surely I have the same recommendation for the application process, right?  Nope.
WHEN APPLYING, IT'S ESSENTIAL TO "READ THE ROOM."  
We know what that phrase means in the context of an actual room or a meeting, but what I mean here is you have to know the mood of the application process into which you are applying.  There are years where cold, hard plans to make a lot of money and be a super innovative genius are going to be passable.  This is not one of those years.  We live in a time where social injustice is streaming onto our phones everyday, where news media is transforming overnight, where "global business" means twenty different things, where the world is literally melting down environmentally, and where tech and business platforms offer some of the very best solutions to those problems.  This means two things when you talk about your goals, passions, interests, and why you want an MBA:

1. YOU WILL PROBABLY COME ACROSS AS COLD, HEARTLESS, AND OUT OF TOUCH IF YOU WRITE ABOUT GOALS THAT ARE FOCUSED ON YOU.  
This is pretty much true always, no matter what is happening in the world around you, but at a time like this, you will seem especially myopic if you aren't engaging with society on at least some level when you share your story.  Is that fair?  Probably not, but I'm just telling you the truth.  The person reading your file follows the same people on Twitter you do and they are going to bed every night thinking "geez man, things are falling apart."  They are also reading lots of files of people wanting to use their talents to solve problems.  If you want to use your talents to make money or satisfy your own internal desires, you just won't measure up very well.
2. YOU ARE MISSING THE DOZENS (HUNDREDS?) OF WAYS THAT BUSINESS CAN BE USED TO SOLVE SOCIAL ISSUES.
Profit-based business could be the solution to anything from the polar ice caps melting to kickstarting a new way of nominating presidential candidates to supplying water to third-world countries to advancing information technology in medicine.  I would wager that every person applying to b-school (at least every person that deserves to go) could dig deep and find A) an issue they care about, and B) a skill or experience they have that could potentially help address that issue in a business context.  Maybe that's not the case and if so, don't lie.  But my challenge to you, reader, is try to find that.  Make that your first challenge to yourself and then retreat back if you have to.  But start there.

No matter what you do as it pertains to an MBA, don't just give up.  Action is what leads to changes, so keep charging ahead.

If you are applying to MBA programs and are looking for a coach to stand beside you and help you get the best results possible, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com.

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Re: Stanford MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 27 Mar 2017, 03:54
By Adam Hoff, Amerasia Consulting Group
Time for another edition of Monday MBA Resource, where we share the things we are reading, watching, and listening to that might be helpful to people in the MBA community.
Some are more focused on applicants, others are better for students, some for both - but all of them offer great insights that are worth soaking up. Let's hope we can keep it up with this next entry, which is the book:
THE CHARISMA MYTH: HOW ANYONE CAN MASTER THE ART AND SCIENCE OF PERSONAL MAGNETISM by Olivia Fox Cabene.
WHO WROTE IT:
Olivia Fox Cabene is an executive coach to Fortune 500 CEOs, a lecturer, and a writer.  She is an expert at teaching crucial, next-level behaviors to people in powerful positions.  She uses strong behavioral science principles, but also draws from her diverse background - she has dual citizenship (American and French) and speaks four languages.
WHAT IT'S ABOUT: 
From her website, which sums it up quite well:

"For the first time, science and technology have taken charisma apart,  figured it out and turned it into an applied science: In controlled laboratory experiments, researchers could raise or lower people's level of charisma as if they were turning a dial.
What you'll find here is practical magic: unique knowledge, drawn from a variety of sciences, revealing what charisma really is and how it works.  You'll get both the insights and the techniques you need to apply this knowledge. The world will become your lab, and every person you meet, a chance to experiment."

WHO IT BENEFITS: 
Honestly, as with last week, I think this one is for everyone.  Not only does this book actually work in the intended way - boosting levels of personal magnetism - but it also has a way of helping reframe life around us.  I know for me, reading this book helped me a great deal in being more present ("be where your feet are" is how I heard one baseball manager put it), slowing down to appreciate life as its happening, and to cut my "staring at screens" technology addiction.  And make no mistake: this book really does help you ramp up your own level of charisma.  For MBA applicants, students, and alumni members, that is huge.  How you come off to people - how much power your project and how much you own the space, jump off the page, create a spark, etc. (pick your cliche) - makes a huge difference.  I have been recommending this book for several years running to my clients as "long game" interview prep, because I think it can help transform the way people present in that setting.  But really, truly, this is a great book for everyone.

IF YOU WANT A TEASER: 
Not convinced? Not a big book fan?  At least listen to this podcast episode.

If you are looking help with your applications, please email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com.  We have seen what the competition is doing and we can say without a doubt that we go deeper, more strategic, and generate better results with our methods.  Line up a call and find out for yourself.

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Re: Stanford MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 31 Mar 2017, 10:49
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The Stanford Graduate School of Business has named Kirsten Moss as the new Assistant Dean and Director of MBA Admissions and Financial Aid. In this role, Moss will oversee and manage Stanford GSB’s admissions and financial aid team and map out a vision for reaching, recruiting and selecting top MBA candidates.

Moss previously served in several roles within the Stanford GSB MBA Admissions team, including Director of MBA Admissions and Associate Director of Evaluation. During her tenure, Moss managed the evaluation, marketing and operations teams and developed a new approach to assessing leadership capability.

Prior to joining Stanford GSB, Moss worked at Harvard Business School as Managing Director, MBA Admissions and Financial Aid. Moss has also held positions in corporate consulting and finance.

“Kirsten has deep experience in admissions and leadership talent evaluation both inside and outside Stanford GSB,” says Senior Academic Dean Yossi Feinberg, who chaired the selection process. “Throughout our search process, Kirsten demonstrated her expertise and commitment to helping Stanford GSB continue to attract and develop the future leaders of tomorrow. I have every confidence that Kirsten will continue the MBA’s strong trajectory.”

Moss succeeds Derrick Bolton, who served as Assistant Dean for MBA Admissions and Financial Aid for 15 years before accepting a new position in September 2016 as Dean of Admissions for Stanford’s Knight-Hennessy Scholars Program.

“Kirsten has a strong understanding of our school’s vision and immediately impressed us with her ideas for connecting with the next generation of students making a positive, measurable difference in the world,” says Jonathan Levin, Philip H. Knight Professor and Dean of Stanford GSB. “Kirsten brings a wealth of knowledge and experience—from top-tier MBA admissions programs to business consulting—and will provide fresh insight as we achieve new levels of excellence.”

“Stanford GSB has a rich legacy of equipping students with the tools necessary to create change—individually, within organizations and throughout the world,” says Moss. “I’m thrilled to join the team in this new capacity as we work together to cultivate the next generation of leaders poised to make an impact.”

Moss earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Harvard University, an MBA from Harvard Business School, and is currently pursuing a Doctorate of Psychology from William James College.

Moss’s appointment will begin June 1.
You may also be interested in:
Six Steps to Acing Your Stanford GSB Interview
Jonathan Levin Named Dean of Stanford GSB

Image

***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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Re: Stanford MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 20 Apr 2017, 21:18
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Once again, Stanford is at the front of the pack releasing application deadlines for the class of 2020. The deadlines for the 2017-2018 application cycle have just been released. If you have been putting off thinking about applications, this can serve as a gentle reminder that the season is underway!

Round 1: September 19, 2017
Round 2:  January 10, 2018
Round 3:  April 4, 2018

What is noteworthy?

While the deadline dates are not that surprising, Stanford has moved up the time of day that the applications are due. This will hopefully not matter for you since I am sure you will all be finished well ahead of the deadlines, but the apps are now due at 10AM Pacific on the deadline date.

What do do now?

While the questions have not been released yet, it is good time to start thinking about the stories that you want to tell. Look back at what Stanford has asked in previous years and start to draft material that you can use in essays once the questions officially come out.

If you have any questions about how to approach your Stanford application, or school selection and story development inquiries in general, reach out! Personal MBA Coach has been helping applicants get into Stanford and other top programs since 2008 with a unique and personalized approach. Email scott@personalmbacoach.com to learn more or sign up for a consultation.

 

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New post 28 Apr 2017, 12:01
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The Stanford Graduate School of Business has published the following MBA application deadlines for the 2017-2018 admissions season.

Round 1
Application Deadline: September 19, 2017
Notification Date: December 14, 2017

Round 2
Application Deadline: January 10, 2018
Notification Date: March 29, 2018

Round 3
Application Deadline: April 4, 2018
Notification Date: Mid May 2018

Candidates should note that all materials must be submitted by 1 p.m. Pacific Time on the day of the deadline to be considered for that round. The application will go live in June. For more information, please visit the Stanford GSB admissions website.

Image

***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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Re: Stanford MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 11 May 2017, 18:44
I have been getting a lot of emails lately that center on the same basic idea: "I got feedback directly from the admissions office and they told me X about my application."
Sometimes the feedback is ultra specific ("you should seriously consider retaking your GMAT") and other times it is extremely vague ("there were elements of your application that just weren't quite where they needed to be"), usually somewhere in between.
The question is: should you put stock in what they are saying?
Let's just say that - spoiler alert - my post title may indicate where I land on this.

First, Some Context
When you have worked in an admissions office at a competitive school and fielded calls and emails from denied candidates, you know how brutal it often is to try to come up with reasons that person was denied.  If you have not worked in such a capacity, let me tell you - it is brutal.  Let me break down some key info here.
The reality is that at very competitive schools, it can be extremely difficult to know why you denied someone.
These programs are having to take a list of initial "admits" (people that have been flagged as admitted by their individual file reader) and shave it way down.  Like WAY down.  And if you are in a very popular demographic (White Male, Indian Male, etc.), it is often just a bloodbath. A lot of times it is completely unfair, or maybe it is subjective, or perhaps you the reader just didn't really remember the app and so when it came time to lop off people and hit the numbers, they shrugged and said "sure, cut him."  I don't mean to sound heartless, but that's how it can go down.
So What Does This Mean?
Well, if you are that admissions officer and someone gets in touch with you (either because your school offers feedback, ala Tuck, or because you worked some back channels or connections to get in touch with an admissions officer), what are you supposed to say?  Either you mumble through something about it being a competitive year, or you grab onto some BS reason like a quant split or a junior year grade or something even more vague like the recommendation letters.
The #1 goal of an admissions officer talking to a denied student is to GET OFF THE PHONE CALL. I promise you this.
What Should You Do?

If you would like the kind of assistance and evaluation that helps you understand where you might have actually gone wrong - or might be going wrong this time around - hit us up at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com.

Source: Taking MBA Admissions Feedback With a Grain of Salt — Amerasia Consulting Group - <http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/blog/2017/4/24/taking-mba-admissions-feedback-with-a-grain-of-salt>

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Re: Stanford MBA Admissions & Related Blogs   [#permalink] 11 May 2017, 18:44

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