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Expert advice for Yale from Admissions Consultant blogs

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Expert advice for Yale from Admissions Consultant blogs  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2017, 12:01
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This fall, five top business schools are launching the M2M, a portfolio of double degreesgiving recent university graduates the opportunity to complete two master’s degrees by attending two top business schools in two different countries over two years.

This initiative is an effort by leading business schools on multiple continents to meet the demands of a globalized economy and provide future business leaders with a distinctive learning experience that will accelerate their careers.

The M2M programs are a collaboration among five schools: FGV Escola de Administração de Empresas de São Paulo, HEC Paris, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Business School, Sauder School of Business University of British Columbia, and the Yale School of Management.

David Bach, Deputy Dean at Yale SOM, says that the M2M is all about choice: “Whatever pathway students choose, young leaders who are interested in having impact throughout their careers will quickly develop skills that set them apart in the global marketplace, while building a deep network of like-minded peers around the world. The world needs more globally minded leaders, not fewer, and with this initiative we seek to positively impact organizations confronting challenging issues at the nexus of business and society.”

The five participating schools are all members of the Global Network for Advanced Management, a network of top business schools committed to educating global leaders through collaboration and innovation.

Six M2M double degrees are available as of September 2017 for student applications: FGV-Yale, HEC-FGV, HEC-HKUST, HEC-Yale, HKUST-Yale, and Sauder-Yale. After they complete both academic years, students will graduate with two master’s degrees, one from each school they attended. Graduates will be alumni of both schools and will have access to the schools’ career resources.

This innovative program gives ambitious students an unparalleled advantage by grounding them in the distinctive academic cultures and approaches of two top business schools in different countries, while preparing them for global roles. Students get the chance to study alongside peers from all continents with diverse experiences. They will benefit from curricular and extracurricular collaborations among the schools, highly personalized career services, and the networks of two global business schools.

“The innovation here is to go to the market with a range of world class academic partners sharing joint admission processes and aiming at recruiting together a significant number of students,” says HEC Paris Dean Peter Todd. “We are convinced that this offer meets the demand of growing numbers of extremely talented and globally-mobile students who target prestigious double degree programs as passports for international careers.”
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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Re: Expert advice for Yale from Admissions Consultant blogs  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2018, 13:59
An MBA degree is a desired commodity all around the world. Although top-notch business schools exist on nearly all continents, many applicants set their sights on U.S.-based programs. As a result, the incoming classes at top-ranked business schools in the United States typically consist of at least 30% international students. The Class of 2019, the latest incoming class, is no exception. We examined the profiles of incoming classes at top U.S. business schools more closely to find out which ones feature a notable percentage of internationals.

The Yale School of Management’s prestige undoubtedly helped the school attract the highest percentage of international students among the schools we examined; 45% of the Class of 2019 at Yale hail from outside the United States. At Columbia Business School, 43% of incoming students are classified as international, while the figure is 41% at the Stanford Graduate School of Business.Image
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Re: Expert advice for Yale from Admissions Consultant blogs  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Apr 2018, 11:23
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Round 3 deadlines are nearly upon us, and while the final round is the biggest gamble of the application cycle, schools have that round for a reason and use it to admit those stellar students that add something really special to their classes.

Special meaning unusual work experience, substantial community service, a diverse background, compelling leadership examples, unique or uncommon interests outside of business or entrepreneurial success of some sort.

Here’s a sampling of reactions from the admissions teams at well-ranked MBA programs on whether Round 3 really is a viable option for applicants.
Yale School of Management
“My view is that you have nothing to lose and everything to gain by applying in Round 3,” says Admissions Director Bruce DelMonico. His reasoning? Well, they always save room for applicants from the final round. Plus, unlike at some business schools, international students are welcome to apply in the third round.

And finally, DelMonico says, “Round 3 can be a ‘test run’ for your next application, without any negative consequences. For applicants who aren’t admitted this year, we provide feedback upon request over the summer on how you might be able to improve your candidacy, so there can even be a benefit to applying now.”
MIT Sloan School of Management
“Three years ago, we decided to add a Round 3 application deadline for a variety of reasons, one of which was  because we wanted to accommodate applicants who become ready to apply later in the traditional MBA admissions cycle,” explains MBA admissions director Dawna Levenson.

“The Round 3 application deadline was designed to give these individuals—whose professional or personal circumstances have unexpectedly changed—an opportunity not to have to wait another year.  So if this sounds like you, and you are now ready to begin your MBA studies next fall, I encourage you to apply!”
UT McCombs School of Business
“Our goal in all of our programs is to build the best and most diverse class that we can, NOT to fill all of our seats as fast as we can. So the best time to submit your application is when you are ready to do so, when you’re confident it will be the best representation of you and your fit with the program. You can trust that we’ll be ready to start the review process,” writes Kimberly Jones on the McCombs MBA Insider blog.
Michigan Ross School of Business
And finally, admissions Director Soojin Kwon gives these three, succinct reasons to apply in Round 3.
  • We reserve space in the class for Round 3.
  • We like Round 3 applicants. Last year, some of our best students – academically and leadership-wise – were admitted in Round 3.
  • There’s no chance of being admitted if you don’t apply.

SBC’s Advice for Round 3 Applicants
You should definitely use the required or optional MBA admission essays to explain to the admissions committee your reasons for waiting until the third – or final – round to apply. You don’t want anyone to jump to the conclusion that you are using round three as a last-ditch effort to get into business school in the fall after receiving rejections from other schools in earlier rounds.

With fewer slots available, fine-tune your focus on schools where you’ll be a compelling candidate. A strong, well-thought-out application is critical. Make sure your academic profile aligns with the school’s median GMAT and average GPA and that you add something special to the class that the admissions committee didn’t see earlier in the season.

Standing out from the pack is imperative, and never more so than when applying later in the game. As I mentioned in this US News blog post, if you want to do well in the admissions process, you have to communicate who you are, not just what you do.

Finally, it’s important to have a Plan B in case things don’t go your way. You can always apply to a set of schools in round three knowing there is a good chance you will need to reapply to them and add in some new ones next season.
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.
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Re: Expert advice for Yale from Admissions Consultant blogs  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jun 2018, 10:54
We hosted a question-and-answer session with several leading admissions officers[/b] earlier this year that featured Yale School of Management (SOM) Assistant Dean for Admissions Bruce DelMonico. Ever the straight shooter, Bruce told us that the SOM would not be changing its application essay prompt for this season. We likely should have just taken him at his word, but just to be sure, we waited to see whether Yale would indeed officially recommit to its single essay, and… it did! The school has made no modifications to its prompt. So, you have one 500-word essay with which to make an impression on the admissions committee. Here it is. . .

Describe the biggest commitment you have ever made. (500 words maximum)

In a Yale SOM blog post about the school’s essay prompt, Bruce noted that this “seemingly simple and straightforward question” was composed with assistance from one of the program’s organizational behavior professors. Yale’s admissions committee clearly takes the application essay seriously and is being thoughtful about the types of behaviors it wants to see in the school’s students. In our online event, Bruce declared himself “agnostic” about whether applicants should discuss a personal commitment or a professional one. He notes that he is simply trying to gauge the level to which candidates commit themselves, rather than the context of the engagement: “We don’t have a preference for professional or personal accomplishments. . . . We are not making value judgments about what that commitment is, but it is more about how you approach that commitment, how you have demonstrated that commitment, and what sorts of behaviors underlie that commitment.”

You may initially think that this prompt is rather narrow in scope, allowing you space to share the story of just a single professional or community project and nothing more. Although you can certainly discuss your dedication to a particular project or cause, you are definitely not restricted to this approach. Consider this: you can also be committed to an idea (e.g., personal liberty) or a value (e.g., creating opportunity for others), and approaching your essay from this angle instead could enable you to share much more of and about yourself with the SOM admissions committee. For example, you might relate a few anecdotes that on the surface seem unrelated—drawing from different parts of your life—but that all support and illustrate how you are guided by a particular value. Or, to return to the example of personal liberty as a theme, you could show how you take control of your academic and professional paths, adhering steadfastly to your values and vision. Whatever you choose to feature as the focus of your commitment, your actions and decisions, manifest via a variety of experiences, must allow you to own it as a genuine part of who you are as an individual. Identifying a theme that you think no one else will ever use is not your goal here; presenting authentic anecdotes that powerfully support your selected theme is what is important.

However, if you prefer to focus on a single anecdote, the commitment you claim must be truly inordinate. Being particularly proud of an accomplishment is not enough to make it an effective topic for this essay. You need to demonstrate your constancy and dedication in the face of challenges or resistance, revealing that your connection to the experience was hard won. Strive to show that you have been resolute in following a sometimes difficult path and have doggedly stayed on course, citing clear examples to illustrate your steadfastness. Nothing commonplace will work here—you must make your reader truly understand your journey and leave him or her more impressed by your effort than the outcome.

For a thorough exploration of the Yale SOM academic program/merits, defining characteristics, crucial statistics, social life, academic environment, and other key features, check out the mbaMission Insider’s Guide to the Yale School of Management.

The Next Step—Mastering Your Yale SOM Interview: Many MBA candidates find admissions interviews stressful and intimidating, but mastering this important element of the application process is definitely possible—the key is informed preparation. To help you on your way to this high level of preparation, we offer our free Interview Primers. Download your free copy of the Yale School of Management Interview Primer today.
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Re: Expert advice for Yale from Admissions Consultant blogs  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jun 2018, 08:18
If you’re in the midst of GMAT preparation or the MBA application process, you’ve almost certainly stumbled upon (or actively researched) stories about rising GMAT scores.

It wasn’t too long ago that an overall score of 700 represented a nice, round, respected target, even for top schools. In 2005, the cream of the MBA crop was littered with 700-level average GMAT scores – 707 at HBS, 704 at Tuck, 701 at Haas, 700 at Kellogg and Sloan, and 695 at Booth – all of which are bound to evoke jealousy or disbelief among applicants entering the process today.

Back in 1996, incoming classes at many of those MBA programs had average GMAT scores in the 650 to 660 range. At the start of the 21st century, a Quant sub-score of 45 put you in the 82nd percentile. A few years later, it was good for 78th (2006), then 75th (2007), then 71st (2009), and 66th (2013). Today, that Q45 lands you in the 57th percentile of GMAT test takers worldwide!

There is no denying the GMAT arms race – and applicants, schools, and rankings are all in on the action. More people are taking the test, test takers can freely cancel unwanted scores, applicants worried about the GMAT can now take the GRE, and MBA programs are as rankings-focused as ever before. The causes are myriad, and the impact on MBA classes continues to play out.

Discussions about cause and effect are nice, but we’ll save those for another day. My goal here is to take a closer look at the rise of GMAT scores by schools and "tiers" – with the hope of helping you better visualize what the GMAT field looks like among the top full-time MBA programs in the U.S.

Average GMAT Scores (Means)

As you’ve Googled around and gone down a few GMAT Club rabbit holes, you may have encountered claims that “720 is the new 700.” While I usually caution against sweeping generalizations, MBA adages, or blog paranoia, the 720-is-the-new-700 concept does hold water.

The underlying question is not whether it’s true – the questions are more “over what time period” and “what does this mean for specific schools”? The following chart shows the average (mean) scores for seven tiers of U.S. MBA programs (37 schools), followed by a few key observations:

excellent annual GMAT series. Each analysis includes five-year look-backs for the top 50 U.S. programs.

Median GMAT Scores

Most top-tier programs report mean GMAT scores on their class profile pages. But every so often, you will come across a school that only provides the median. Examples include HBSYale, and UNC Kenan-Flagler. Thankfully, if you do a little digging, you can find those means reported elsewhere.The reverse exercise is the far more cumbersome task. That is to say, if you really want to know the median GMAT scores across programs, only a handful of schools give it to you directly. So you have to sleuth around. Poets and Quants' "Meet XYZ's Class of 2019" tends to cite both where available.

When doing your school diligence, I encourage you to compare means to means and medians to medians. As you'll see in the data that follows, the median GMAT score at a given MBA program is usually higher than the mean. (You can typically round the mean up to the nearest 10 points.)

Over the past decade, estimated median GMAT scores at the top 19 U.S. MBA programs have trended upward by a solid 20 points. There's a 10-point median uptick for schools ranked in the 20s and 30s. (Note that certain 2017 medians and some historical data reflect mean-based estimates.)

Free Consultation. [And for a fantastic analysis of the MBA admissions chances for Indian applicants at the top 50 U.S. programs – including GMAT score data – please check out this GMAT Club post.]

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Re: Expert advice for Yale from Admissions Consultant blogs  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2018, 17:02
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The Yale School of Management has published the application essay for the 2018-2019 admissions season, and it is the same question as in last year’s application.

In his blog post, Assistant Dean of admissions Bruce DelMonico explains: “This application essay question evolved from a conversation with Professor of Organizational Behavior Amy Wrzesniewski about how to get a better sense for what our applicants care about in the world.

She notes, ‘Reading about future plans is helpful, but actions speak louder than words. What big commitments have applicants already made in their lives to date, how did they follow through on them, and what does this tell us about who they are? That is what is at the heart of this question’.”

While writing this essay keep in mind the Yale SOM’s mission, as explained by Dean Edward A. Snyder: “Yale SOM is persistent and disciplined in our efforts to connect to big issues, to integrate with Yale, to be distinctively global, and to work across all sectors. All of our efforts are guided by a strategy that accounts for how the world has changed over the last several decades and the implications for leadership. The success of our efforts depends entirely on extraordinary alignment and superior teamwork—internally and externally.”

Contact us to learn more about designing the best Yale application possible with Stacy Blackman Consulting.

Describe the biggest commitment you have ever made. (500 words maximum)

As the Assistant Dean mentions, this question is about your past actions, not what you plan to do. Behavioral questions like this one (the tip off is “describe”) seek to understand how you actually operate in various situations. Think about what a commitment is to you. Was it a job or an organization that you were involved in?

Maybe your commitment was to a value or a person. Try to be as specific as possible about your commitment and why it qualifies as the biggest commitment you have ever made. What did you think or say when you were determining what to do? What did you actually do? How did you feel about the result?

You may decide to focus on a solo commitment, and that may be entirely appropriate since most MBA applicants are individual contributors. However, ideally you can demonstrate how you work with others as a leader and team member.

Yale is a program focused on making a difference in the world and the subject of this question will tell the admissions committee what you value, ideally something that impacts the greater community or world. Regardless of whether you choose an individual or team commitment, try to show how you have made a significant positive impact.

Because this is the only essay question in the application and should be used to highlight your personal qualities and leadership ability, make sure your resume and recommendations can answer any questions about your career and accomplishments.

The 500-word limit may be daunting. Instead of censoring yourself on the first draft and limiting what you write, start by describing each step in of your accomplishment in detail in terms of what you did, the reaction of others and your own reaction.

From there you can cut out anything that is too detailed or too superfluous to the story to maintain the 500-word maximum. Using an outside reader to help you determine what is most important to the story may help you streamline your essay.
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.
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Re: Expert advice for Yale from Admissions Consultant blogs  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2018, 17:12
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Bruce DelMonico, assistant dean of admissions at the Yale School of Management, has previewed the required essay for the 2018-2019 full-time MBA application. It remains unchanged from last year’s prompt.
Required Essay Question
Describe the biggest commitment you have ever made. (500 words maximum)

In his post, DelMonico noted the following: “This application essay question evolved from a conversation with Professor of Organizational Behavior Amy Wrzesniewski about how to get a better sense for what our applicants care about in the world. She notes, ‘Reading about future plans is helpful, but actions speak louder than words. What big commitments have applicants already made in their lives to date, how did they follow through on them, and what does this tell us about who they are? That is what is at the heart of this question’.”

For more information, please visit the Yale SOM admissions website.
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.
Re: Expert advice for Yale from Admissions Consultant blogs &nbs [#permalink] 29 Jun 2018, 17:12
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