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GMAT Grammar Book: Commands

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GMAT Grammar Book: Commands  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2010, 13:05

COMMANDS


This post is a part of [GMAT GRAMMAR BOOK]

created by: bb
edited by: dzyubam


A command is an order given to another person. It can be preceded by please in order to make it more polite. The simple form of the verb is used and you is the understood subject.

Make your bed. Clean your room.
Please open the door for me. Be quiet.

Negative Commands


A negative command adds the word don’t before the simple verb.

Don’t get in my way. Don’t miss the bus.
Please don’t do that again. Don’t put that there.

Indirect Commands


Indirect commands will normally use the verbs ask, tell, order, or say. They are followed by the infinitive of the verb (to + verb).

The judge ordered him to pay what he owed.
The professor asked the class to open their books.
Please tell Paul to return the library book.
He told me to wait in the hall.

Negative Indirect Commands


Add the word not before the infinitive verb to make an indirect command negative.

I told Rachel not to walk that way to school.
Abigail ordered Jerry not to pull her hair.
Please ask the kids not to make so much noise.
Sue asked the hairdresser not to shorten her hair length.




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This post is a part of [GMAT GRAMMAR BOOK]

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Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Commands  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2010, 08:38
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dzyubam wrote:

COMMANDS


This post is a part of [GMAT GRAMMAR BOOK]

created by: bb
edited by: dzyubam


A command is an order given to another person. It can be preceded by please in order to make it more polite. The simple form of the verb is used and you is the understood subject.

Make your bed. Clean your room.
Please open the door for me. Be quiet.

Negative Commands


A negative command adds the word don’t before the simple verb.

Don’t get in my way. Don’t miss the bus.
Please don’t do that again. Don’t put that there.

Indirect Commands


Indirect commands will normally use the verbs ask, tell, order, or say. They are followed by the infinitive of the verb (to + verb).

The judge ordered him to pay what he owed.
The professor asked the class to open their books.
Please tell Paul to return the library book.
He told me to wait in the hall.

Negative Indirect Commands


Add the word not before the infinitive verb to make an indirect command negative.

I told Rachel not to walk that way to school.
Abigail ordered Jerry not to pull her hair.
Please ask the kids not to make so much noise.
Sue asked the hairdresser not to shorten her hair length.




Think something is missing? Let us know - Help Improve GMAT Club's Grammar Book Project!
This post is a part of [GMAT GRAMMAR BOOK]



Nice information. But I have few doubts.

The professor asked the class to open their books.

I think the above line should be rewritten as

The professor asked the STUDENTS to open their books.
Class to open their books seems somewhat odd to me. May be I'm missing something.

Also, I have doubt about these 2 line
Abigail ordered Jerry not to pull her hair.

In the above sentence isn't ''her'' ambiguous? It can refer either to Abigail or Jerry???

And in the following sentence, why can't ''her'' refer to hairdresser??
Sue asked the hairdresser not to shorten her hair length.
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Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Commands  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2010, 08:46
May be hairdresser is dressing her own hair and Sue is asking "her" (hairdresser) not to shorten her own hair.

I'm assuming many thing I think :)

Anyhow thanks again for creating wonderful grammar book.
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Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Commands  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2010, 21:42
First of all - kudos! Thank you for pointing these out.

kissthegmat wrote:

Also, I have doubt about these 2 line
Abigail ordered Jerry not to pull her hair.

In the above sentence isn't ''her'' ambiguous? It can refer either to Abigail or Jerry???

I don't know a lot of women named Jerry (at least none without a beard) - it is a pretty common man's name
kissthegmat wrote:
And in the following sentence, why can't ''her'' refer to hairdresser??
Sue asked the hairdresser not to shorten her hair length.

Though you are absolutely correct that from grammatical point of view, this could mean either of the two (possibly could be fixed with a male name), from logical standpoint not so much but point taken.
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Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Commands  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2010, 04:46
Thank BB.

I missed "Tom and Jerry." :)

--== Message from the GMAT Club Team ==--

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This discussion does not meet community quality standards. It has been retired.


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Re: GMAT Grammar Book: Commands   [#permalink] 01 Aug 2010, 04:46
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