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Re: Gunfight at OK Corral, a famous gunfight in Tombstone, Arizona in 1881 [#permalink]
C is idiomatically incorrect,...
not x, but y is correct idiom

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Re: Gunfight at OK Corral, a famous gunfight in Tombstone, Arizona in 1881 [#permalink]
CEdward wrote:
Am I wrong here in thinking that "as" in C is nonsense? There is no comparison taking place. But would seem more appropriate.

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It sounds a bit awkward but C is trying to compare what makes the incident more famous, the incident being historical or it being mentioned in movies and books. Hence, "as" is used to show it being historical contributes to the incident being famous but not as much as it being shown in movies and books.
Hope so I did not make it too complicated 😂.
Cheers 👍

Originally posted by AdityaJha on 26 Jan 2021, 02:17.
Last edited by AdityaJha on 26 Jan 2021, 02:33, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Gunfight at OK Corral, a famous gunfight in Tombstone, Arizona in 1881 [#permalink]
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Gknight5603 wrote:
C is idiomatically incorrect,...
not x, but y is correct idiom

Posted from my mobile device

The passage actually means to say both x and y has contributed but tries to compare which of these two contributed more.
So 'x but not as much as y' has been used.
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Re: Gunfight at OK Corral, a famous gunfight in Tombstone, Arizona in 1881 [#permalink]
AdityaJha wrote:
Review both the options, C and E.
THE passage meant to say that the incident is famous because of historical importance but is mostly known because of its portrayal in numerous movies and books.
E changes the meaning to 'not at all famous because of historical importance' but only known because of its portrayal in numerous movies and books.
C does not change the meaning and is grammatically correct.

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Why is D incorrect?
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Re: Gunfight at OK Corral, a famous gunfight in Tombstone, Arizona in 1881 [#permalink]
erv20 wrote:
AdityaJha wrote:
Review both the options, C and E.
THE passage meant to say that the incident is famous because of historical importance but is mostly known because of its portrayal in numerous movies and books.
E changes the meaning to 'not at all famous because of historical importance' but only known because of its portrayal in numerous movies and books.
C does not change the meaning and is grammatically correct.

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Why is D incorrect?


D says, "is not famous because of historical importance".

The passage meant to say that it is famous because of its history but mostly because of its portrayal in books and movies.
D changes the meaning and does not give any credit to its history.
Hope it helps 👍
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Re: Gunfight at OK Corral, a famous gunfight in Tombstone, Arizona in 1881 [#permalink]
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Abdeviliiers wrote:
isnt E more appropriate than C

Gknight5603 wrote:
C is idiomatically incorrect,...
not x, but y is correct idiom

Posted from my mobile device
CEdward wrote:
Am I wrong here in thinking that "as" in C is nonsense? There is no comparison taking place. But would seem more appropriate.

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"I'm your huckleberry." Anyone? Tombstone? In all seriousness, I see a lot of confusion on this one, so for what it is worth, I will offer my thoughts in an effort to assist the community. First off, the idiomatic constructs so much as and as much as are often used interchangeably. For instance, either of the following sentences would be grammatically and semantically acceptable:

1) His recent lottery win was not so much based on skill as it was luck.

2) His recent lottery win was not as much based on skill as it was luck.

Both sentences convey a comparison, and within that comparison, there is an imbalance. Looking at (C), we find a similar not so much X... as Y construct with parallel entities in the X and Y slots:

Quote:
[The] gunfight at OK Corral, a famous gunfight in Tombstone, Arizona in 1881, is famous not so much because of its historical importance as because of its portrayal in numerous movies and books

AdityaJha has it just right at the top of the thread. Choice (E) conveys that the gunfight at OK Corral is of no historical importance. (Choice (D) suffers from the same problem, and, if anything, should help you to see the problem in (E).) Without the comparison in place, the meaning is skewed and the sentence confusing. (Is the gunfight at OK Corral made up, appearing only in books and movies?)

Although the question would not appear as is on the GMAT™—there should be the article the at the beginning of the sentence, for example, and many similar sentences place an additional comma after a state name—it is constructed well enough and tests key splits in a legitimate manner, so I would not write it off.

I hope that helps. Good luck with your studies, everyone.

- Andrew
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Re: Gunfight at OK Corral, a famous gunfight in Tombstone, Arizona in 1881 [#permalink]
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Re: Gunfight at OK Corral, a famous gunfight in Tombstone, Arizona in 1881 [#permalink]
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