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Hydrogeology is a science dealing with the properties

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Senior Manager
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Hydrogeology is a science dealing with the properties [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2008, 07:08
Hydrogeology is a science dealing with the properties, distribution, and circulation of water on the surface of the land, in the soil and underlying rocks, and in the atmosphere. The hydrologic cycle, a major topic in this science, is the complete cycle of phenomena through which water passes, beginning as atmospheric water vapor, passing into liquid and solid form as precipitation, thence along and into the ground surface, and finally again returning to the form of atmospheric water vapor by means of evaporation and transpiration.

The term “geohydrology” is sometimes erroneously used as a synonym for “hydrogeology.” Geohydrology is concerned with underground water. There are many formations that contain water but are not part of the hydrologic cycle because of geologic changes that have isolated them underground. These systems are properly termed geohydrologic but not hydrogeologic. Only when a system possesses natural or artificial boundaries that associate the water within it with the hydrologic cycle may the entire system properly be termed hydrogeologic.


It can be inferred that which of the following is most likely to be the subject of study by a geohydrologist?

(A) Soft, porous rock being worn away by a waterfall
(B) Water depositing minerals on the banks of a gorge through which the water runs
(C) The trapping of water in a sealed underground rock cavern through the action of an earthquake
(D) Water becoming unfit to drink through the release of pollutants into it from a manufacturing plant
(E) The changing course of a river channel as the action of the water wears away the rocks past which the river flows

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Re: RC:Hydrogeology [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2008, 08:00
vksunder wrote:
Hydrogeology is a science dealing with the properties, distribution, and circulation of water on the surface of the land, in the soil and underlying rocks, and in the atmosphere. The hydrologic cycle, a major topic in this science, is the complete cycle of phenomena through which water passes, beginning as atmospheric water vapor, passing into liquid and solid form as precipitation, thence along and into the ground surface, and finally again returning to the form of atmospheric water vapor by means of evaporation and transpiration.

The term “geohydrology” is sometimes erroneously used as a synonym for “hydrogeology.” Geohydrology is concerned with underground water. There are many formations that contain water but are not part of the hydrologic cycle because of geologic changes that have isolated them underground. These systems are properly termed geohydrologic but not hydrogeologic. Only when a system possesses natural or artificial boundaries that associate the water within it with the hydrologic cycle may the entire system properly be termed hydrogeologic.


It can be inferred that which of the following is most likely to be the subject of study by a geohydrologist?

(A) Soft, porous rock being worn away by a waterfall
(B) Water depositing minerals on the banks of a gorge through which the water runs
(C) The trapping of water in a sealed underground rock cavern through the action of an earthquake "Geohydrology is concerned with underground water. There are many formations that contain water but are not part of the hydrologic cycle because of geologic changes that have isolated them underground"
(D) Water becoming unfit to drink through the release of pollutants into it from a manufacturing plant
(E) The changing course of a river channel as the action of the water wears away the rocks past which the river flows


IMO C

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Re: RC:Hydrogeology [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2008, 08:40
IMO C.

Geohydrologist must define his study within “Geohydrology” that ‘is concerned with underground water’. Therefore only C states water trapping underground rock through the earthquake.
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Re: RC:Hydrogeology [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2008, 12:37
OA=C. Thanks!

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Re: RC:Hydrogeology   [#permalink] 01 Aug 2008, 12:37
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Hydrogeology is a science dealing with the properties

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