Last visit was: 14 Jul 2024, 09:15 It is currently 14 Jul 2024, 09:15
Close
GMAT Club Daily Prep
Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History
Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.
Close
Request Expert Reply
Confirm Cancel
SORT BY:
Date
Math Expert
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 94342
Own Kudos [?]: 640735 [5]
Given Kudos: 85011
Send PM
VP
VP
Joined: 27 Feb 2017
Posts: 1472
Own Kudos [?]: 2325 [0]
Given Kudos: 114
Location: United States (WA)
GMAT 1: 760 Q50 V42
GMAT 2: 760 Q50 V42
GRE 1: Q169 V168

GRE 2: Q170 V170
Send PM
Intern
Intern
Joined: 01 May 2020
Posts: 15
Own Kudos [?]: 13 [0]
Given Kudos: 39
Location: India
GMAT 1: 730 Q50 V38
Send PM
Intern
Intern
Joined: 12 Apr 2019
Status: Preparing
Posts: 17
Own Kudos [?]: 10 [0]
Given Kudos: 19
Concentration: Marketing, Strategy
Schools: ISB '24
WE:Analyst (Energy and Utilities)
Send PM
Re: Ice floats on water, making it an exception to the general rule of [#permalink]
Sentence: Ice floats on water, making it an exception to the general rule of a substance being denser in its solid state than in its liquid state.

Meaning: The fact that ice floats on water is an exception to a general rule. What is this general rule? That a substance is denser in its solid state than in its liquid state. To put it in geeky terms, the pronoun 'it' refers to the entire clause, 'ice floats on water', and this clause is an exception to the general rule that a substance is denser in its solid state than in its liquid state. The correct answer will clearly articulate this idea.

Quote:
A. of a substance being denser in its solid state than in its liquid state

Ice floats on water, making it an exception to the general rule of a substance being denser? This is a clear candidate for elimination, because 'rule of a' completely distorts the intended meaning. Eliminate A.

Quote:
B. of how a substance is denser in its solid state than in its liquid state

This is tricky, although it has the same problem as A. The intended meaning here is that the fact that ice floats on water is an exception to a general rule. How the substance is denser in its solid state doesn't really have much to do with the meaning. Eliminate B.

Quote:
C. that a substance is denser when its state is solid than when liquid

This option starts with 'that', which is a good sign. However, the rest of the sentence has red flags all over it. An ambiguous pronoun and an unnecessary adverb should be enough reasons to get rid. Eliminate C.

Quote:
D. that a substance is denser in its solid state than in its liquid state

CORRECT. This clearly articulates the idea that we discussed while analyzing the meaning of the sentence. Keep D.

Quote:
E. that a substance is denser when solid than when its state is liquid

Ah, the sneaky adverbs again. The adverb 'when' completely distorts the intended meaning of the original sentence. We're concerned with the substance being denser in its solid state, not when its solid. Also, the awkward comparison between the substance being 'denser when solid than when its state is liquid' is enough reason for us to cross E out. Eliminate E.

Option D it is!

Hope this helps!
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Ice floats on water, making it an exception to the general rule of [#permalink]
Moderators:
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
6979 posts
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
236 posts