It is currently 18 Oct 2017, 12:12

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Idiom question

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 10 May 2004
Posts: 20

Kudos [?]: 9 [0], given: 0

Location: USA
Idiom question [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Jun 2004, 22:57
Quiz:
1) Charles was forbiden (to enter, from entering) the Temple of Doom.
2) He was also prohibited (to visit, from visiting) the Garden of earthly delights.
3) Dean and Jerry (both had their, each had his) own take on why the two split up.

Please explain the choices and why :roll:

Kudos [?]: 9 [0], given: 0

Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 01 Feb 2003
Posts: 842

Kudos [?]: 122 [0], given: 0

Location: Hyderabad
 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Jun 2004, 23:05
(1) ---> to enter

(2) --> from visiting

(3) --> each had his

Explanations:

(1) --> Idiomatic to say forbid to do something. There is no logic here - it is just usage
(2) again an idiom

Kudos [?]: 122 [0], given: 0

SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 16 Oct 2003
Posts: 1798

Kudos [?]: 170 [0], given: 0

Re: Idiom question [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Jun 2004, 23:07
Charles was forbiden from entering the Temple of Doom.
He was also prohibited to visit the Garden of earthly delights.
Dean and Jerry both had their own take on why the two split up.

I think there is no concrete explaination for idiomatic usage. It is just the language widely used.

Please confirm...

Kudos [?]: 170 [0], given: 0

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 10 May 2004
Posts: 20

Kudos [?]: 9 [0], given: 0

Location: USA
 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Jun 2004, 01:16
Vithal is correct on all the three questions but I am still confused. Lets take questions 1 & 2.
If you say "...forbiden to enter the..." then by the same logic the next one should be "...prohibited to enter the...". But here its reversed. Thats the point I am trying to understand. Why?

Similarly for answering question3, lets see this following statementc: "Barbara and Neil both went to the same highschool". So here "and" is combining Barbara and Neil which forms a compound subject and hence we use "both" to address them. Going by the same logic for question3 it should be: "Dean and Jerry both had their own take..." Why is this different. Sorry for being so naive but I really want to understand the subtle differences.

Kudos [?]: 9 [0], given: 0

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 02 Jun 2004
Posts: 184

Kudos [?]: 7 [0], given: 0

Location: Kiev, Ukraine
 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Jun 2004, 10:11
tapsemi wrote:
Vithal is correct on all the three questions but I am still confused. Lets take questions 1 & 2.
If you say "...forbiden to enter the..." then by the same logic the next one should be "...prohibited to enter the...". But here its reversed. Thats the point I am trying to understand. Why?

Similarly for answering question3, lets see this following statementc: "Barbara and Neil both went to the same highschool". So here "and" is combining Barbara and Neil which forms a compound subject and hence we use "both" to address them. Going by the same logic for question3 it should be: "Dean and Jerry both had their own take..." Why is this different. Sorry for being so naive but I really want to understand the subtle differences.


Tapsemi,

1&2 are examples of idiomatic usage, the standard way in which these words are used to make sentences. If you look in Webster's or any other dictionary under these verbs, you'll see examples of their usage in sentences.

The correct idiomatic usage is indeed 'prohibit to do smth.' and 'forbidden from doing smth'

3 is simply redundant. 'both had their own', 'own' pertains to smth that someone has in his sole possession. Ex. this treasure is my own. From the sentence you posted, it looks like Dean and Jerry had different opinions about smth. Therefore, Dean had his own opinion, and Jerry had his own opinion. So, 'each had his own'

I hope I was able to help at least a little. :-D
_________________

Searching for an answer...

Kudos [?]: 7 [0], given: 0

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 10 May 2004
Posts: 20

Kudos [?]: 9 [0], given: 0

Location: USA
 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Jun 2004, 10:59
Thanks SmashingGrace, I got the point :P

Kudos [?]: 9 [0], given: 0

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 21 Mar 2004
Posts: 445

Kudos [?]: 76 [0], given: 0

Location: Cary,NC
 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Jun 2004, 18:55
SmashingGrace wrote:

The correct idiomatic usage is indeed 'prohibit to do smth.' and 'forbidden from doing smth'

I hope I was able to help at least a little. :-D


Grace,
I was looking at some old posts, it seems u got the idioms exchanged.

- ash
_________________

ash
________________________
I'm crossing the bridge.........

Kudos [?]: 76 [0], given: 0

  [#permalink] 29 Jun 2004, 18:55
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Idiom question

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.