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idiom usage DISCOVERY

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Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 21
idiom usage DISCOVERY  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Mar 2019, 16:01
1) RIGHT: I love the DISCOVERY THAT carbon CAN form soccer-ball molecules.

2) SUSPECT: I love the DISCOVERY OF carbons ABILITY TO form soccer-ball molecules.

3) WRONG: I love the DISCOVERY OF carbon BEING ABLE TO form soccer-ball molecules


I can understand the 1st and 3rd sentence but
Why the 2nd sentence is grammatically suspect
May be I am missing something here. Can somebody explain please.
source is manhattan gmat
Manhattan Prep Instructor
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Joined: 04 Dec 2015
Posts: 832
GMAT 1: 790 Q51 V49
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: idiom usage DISCOVERY  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Mar 2019, 18:34
aashishlandmark wrote:
1) RIGHT: I love the DISCOVERY THAT carbon CAN form soccer-ball molecules.

2) SUSPECT: I love the DISCOVERY OF carbons ABILITY TO form soccer-ball molecules.

3) WRONG: I love the DISCOVERY OF carbon BEING ABLE TO form soccer-ball molecules


I can understand the 1st and 3rd sentence but
Why the 2nd sentence is grammatically suspect
May be I am missing something here. Can somebody explain please.
source is manhattan gmat


This is how idioms are described in one chapter of the Manhattan Prep Sentence Correction Strategy Guide. If an idiom is marked 'wrong,' that's because in an official problem explanation, an answer choice has been marked wrong because of that idiom. If an idiom is 'suspect', that usually means one of two things:

- Official problems aren't completely consistent: the idiom might be marked as right in some problems and wrong in others. The GMAT is pretty consistent, so this doesn't happen very often, and these cases are generally noted in the Strategy Guide.
- More often, the 'suspect' idiom appears in a wrong answer, but it's not specifically discussed in the official explanation. So, the idiom is probably wrong, and it doesn't appear in any right answers, but we can't be completely sure what the GMAC thinks about it.

I'd recommend that with these idioms, you use them as a 'last resort'. Don't immediately eliminate an answer choice for using a 'suspect' idiom, but it's okay to do that if you don't have anything else left to work with.
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Re: idiom usage DISCOVERY   [#permalink] 27 Mar 2019, 18:34
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