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Re: If x is a member of the set {a, b, c, d}, where a, b, c, and d are the [#permalink]
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Zarrolou wrote:
If x is a member of the set {a, b, c, d}, where a, b, c, and d are the numbers shown above, what is the value of x?

(1) The hundredths digit of x is greater than 6.
(2) The thousandths digit of x is less than 4.


a = 1,743.152 (2)
b = 2,621.073 (2)
c = 3,280.795 (1) (2)
d = 1,406.927 (1)

Statement 1 identifies 2 numbers, the second identifies 3 numbers , so taken alone they are not sufficient

The only number that matches both 1 and 2 is C, so taken together they are sufficient

C


Hi Zarrolou, beware that you're using hundreds and thousands when the question is asking for hundredths and thousandths. The funny thing is that you have the correct answer (choice C) but it's not the correct element that satisfies both conditions (2,621.073) aka two thousand six hundred and twenty one and 73 thousandths. If you're unsure what I mean, look at the digits identified in the OA.

Herein lies one of the greatest double edged swords of the GMAT. Understanding the question is paramount to answering the correct question, but the exam is formulated in such a way to make deciphering what is being asked part of the challenge. On the flip side, sometimes you get the right answer for the wrong reasons, which is just as valid an answer on test day as a well thought out solution. It's typical GMAT, the hundreds and thousands digits will often be assumed to be the 3rd and 4th digits from the end of a number, and the notation hundredths and thousandths rarely comes up, so many people will jump directly to the trap digits. In this case the trap yields the same overall answer choice, so we dodged a bullet on that one!

Hope this helps!
-Ron
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Re: If x is a member of the set {a, b, c, d}, where a, b, c, and d are the [#permalink]
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a = 1,743.152
b = 2,621.073
c = 3,280.795
d = 1,406.927

If x is a member of the set {a, b, c, d}, where a, b, c, and d are the numbers shown above, what is the value of x?

(1) The hundredths digit of x is greater than 6.
(2) The thousandths digit of x is less than 4.

Rephrasing: X is a, b, c, or d. Which one of those values is X?

1) Hundredths digit is greater than 6.... That leaves b (2,621.073) or c (3,280.795). Insufficient.

2) Thousandths digit if less than 4... That leaves b (2,621.073) or a (1,743.152). Insufficient.

1&2) b is the only number that satisfies both clues. Sufficient. Answer is C.
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Re: If x is a member of the set {a, b, c, d}, where a, b, c, and d are the [#permalink]
Really a tricky and easy question . If understand the concept can be done in 30 seconds otherwise took infinite time.
Better to guess in 2 min and move on.

X is one of the value out of a,b,c & d.

1) Hundredths digit is greater than 6.... That leaves b (2,621.073) or c (3,280.795). Insufficient.

2) Thousandths digit if less than 4... That leaves b (2,621.073) or a (1,743.152). Insufficient.

1+2) The only given number is b which satisfies both conditions.
Hence C is the answer.
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Re: If x is a member of the set {a, b, c, d}, where a, b, c, and d are the [#permalink]
tulsa wrote:
a = 1,743.152
b = 2,621.073
c = 3,280.795
d = 1,406.927

If x is a member of the set {a, b, c, d}, where a, b, c, and d are the numbers shown above, what is the value of x?

(1) The hundredths digit of x is greater than 6.
(2) The thousandths digit of x is less than 4.


This took me 4 min and 24 sec to figure out, do anyone have some tips to speed the whole up? Question difficulty "Hard" in GMATPrep.
C

Explanation:
(1) It is given that the hundredths digit of x is greater than 6. Since the hundredths digit of a, b, c, and d are, respectively, 5, 7, 9, and 2, it follows that x could be b or c (but not a or d); NOT sufficient.

(2) It is given that the thousandths digit of x is less than 4. Since the thousandths digits of a, b, c, and d are, respectively, 2, 3, 5, and 7, it follows that x could be a or b (but not c or d); NOT sufficient.

Given (1) and (2) together, only x = b is possible; SUFFICIENT


Actually I would rate this question on a 500-600 level

See all one has to do is play with the constraints. Eventually with both statements together one will realize that only B is possible

Cheers!
J :)
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Re: If x is a member of the set {a, b, c, d}, where a, b, c, and d are the [#permalink]
I got C very quickly but then I further complicated the question unnecessarily!! :(

a = 1,743.152
b = 2,621.073
c = 3,280.795
d = 1,406.927

(1) The hundredths digit of x is greater than 6. --> gives b and c
(2) The thousandths digit of x is less than 4. --> gives a and b

But then I thought --> c can be rounded to 3280.8 (nearest tenth) and that would change the hundredths digit to 0, so in statement (1) we are left with only b!! And I marked the answer A :(

Well, one example of too much thinking can get you wrong answer!

Just one question, unless statements specify about rounding, we shouldn't round them --> is that correct?
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Re: If x is a member of the set {a, b, c, d}, where a, b, c, and d are the [#permalink]
Expert Reply
anuprita13 wrote:
I got C very quickly but then I further complicated the question unnecessarily!! :(

a = 1,743.152
b = 2,621.073
c = 3,280.795
d = 1,406.927

(1) The hundredths digit of x is greater than 6. --> gives b and c
(2) The thousandths digit of x is less than 4. --> gives a and b

But then I thought --> c can be rounded to 3280.8 (nearest tenth) and that would change the hundredths digit to 0, so in statement (1) we are left with only b!! And I marked the answer A :(

Well, one example of too much thinking can get you wrong answer!

Just one question, unless statements specify about rounding, we shouldn't round them --> is that correct?


Yes, you should not round a number if you are not told to do so.
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Re: If x is a member of the set {a, b, c, d}, where a, b, c, and d are the [#permalink]
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Hi All,

This question is really just about 'math vocabulary' and paying careful attention to the numbers that we're given to work with.

We're told that X is one of the four listed values. We're asked for the value of X.

1) The HUNDREDTHS digit of X is greater than 6.

This Fact narrows down the options to 2 possibilities: B and C - but we don't know which one is X.
Fact 1 is INSUFFICIENT

2) The THOUSANDTHS digit of X is less than 4.

This Fact narrows down the options to 2 possibilities: A and B - but we don't know which one is X.
Fact 2 is INSUFFICIENT

Combined, we now have to look for the 'overlap' - the option(s) that 'fit' BOTH Facts. Based on our prior work, there's ONLY one possibility: value B.

Final Answer:

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Re: If x is a member of the set {a, b, c, d}, where a, b, c, and d are the [#permalink]
Man, I totally interpreted this question as, what is a potential value of x that isn't among those four...in which case the answer would be a clear E.
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Re: If x is a member of the set {a, b, c, d}, where a, b, c, and d are the [#permalink]
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