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In a psychological experiment conducted at Southbay University

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In a psychological experiment conducted at Southbay University  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2018, 06:32
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In a psychological experiment conducted at Southbay University, groups of men with various levels of education read stories in which people caused harm, some of them doing so intentionally, and some accidentally. When asked about appropriate penalization for those who had caused harm, the less educated men, unlike the educated ones, assigned punishments that did not vary according to whether the harm was done intentionally or accidentally. Uneducated men, then, do not regard people's intentions as relevant to penalization.

Which of the following, if true, would most seriously weaken the conclusion above?

(A) In these stories, the severity of the harm produces was clearly stated.

(B) In interpreting these stories the listeners had to draw on a relatively feminine sense of human psychology in order to tell whether harm was produced intentionally or accidentally.

(C) Relatively uneducated men are as likely to produce harm unintentionally as are more educated men.

(D) The more educated men assigned penalization in a way that closely resembled the way women had assign penalization in a similar experiment.

(E) The less educated men assigned penalization that varied according to the severity of the harm done by the agents in the stories.

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In a psychological experiment conducted at Southbay University  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2018, 08:16
itisSheldon wrote:
In a psychological experiment conducted at Southbay University, groups of men with various levels of education read stories in which people caused harm, some of them doing so intentionally, and some accidentally. When asked about appropriate penalization for those who had caused harm, the less educated men, unlike the educated ones, assigned punishments that did not vary according to whether the harm was done intentionally or accidentally. Uneducated men, then, do not regard people's intentions as relevant to penalization.

Which of the following, if true, would most seriously weaken the conclusion above?

(A) In these stories, the severity of the harm produces was clearly stated.

(B) In interpreting these stories the listeners had to draw on a relatively feminine sense of human psychology in order to tell whether harm was produced intentionally or accidentally.

(C) Relatively uneducated men are as likely to produce harm unintentionally as are more educated men.

(D) The more educated men assigned penalization in a way that closely resembled the way women had assign penalization in a similar experiment.

(E) The less educated men assigned penalization that varied according to the severity of the harm done by the agents in the stories.


Our objective here is to challenge the highlighted part of the stimulus....

Thus if the less educated varied punishments according to severity of the harm, it challenges/weakens the author's conclusion that they do not regard the intention of the people's intentions...

Hence answer must be (E)
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Re: In a psychological experiment conducted at Southbay University  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2018, 18:59
Abhishek009 wrote:
itisSheldon wrote:
In a psychological experiment conducted at Southbay University, groups of men with various levels of education read stories in which people caused harm, some of them doing so intentionally, and some accidentally. When asked about appropriate penalization for those who had caused harm, the less educated men, unlike the educated ones, assigned punishments that did not vary according to whether the harm was done intentionally or accidentally. Uneducated men, then, do not regard people's intentions as relevant to penalization.

Which of the following, if true, would most seriously weaken the conclusion above?

(A) In these stories, the severity of the harm produces was clearly stated.

(B) In interpreting these stories the listeners had to draw on a relatively feminine sense of human psychology in order to tell whether harm was produced intentionally or accidentally.

(C) Relatively uneducated men are as likely to produce harm unintentionally as are more educated men.

(D) The more educated men assigned penalization in a way that closely resembled the way women had assign penalization in a similar experiment.

(E) The less educated men assigned penalization that varied according to the severity of the harm done by the agents in the stories.


Our objective here is to challenge the highlighted part of the stimulus....

Thus if the less educated varied punishments according to severity of the harm, it challenges/weakens the author's conclusion that they do not regard the intention of the people's intentions...

Hence answer must be (E)


Hey can you elaborate more on this ?
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Re: In a psychological experiment conducted at Southbay University  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2018, 19:53
How severity of harm can be connected with intentions??
It is quite possible that unintentional punishments can be of more severity.

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Re: In a psychological experiment conducted at Southbay University  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2018, 22:17
Abhishek009 wrote:
Thus if the less educated varied punishments according to severity of the harm, it challenges/weakens the author's conclusion that they do not regard the intention of the people's intentions...

Hence answer must be (E)


Hi Abhishek,

Argument's conclusion - Uneducated men, then, do not regard people's intentions as relevant to penalization.

Answer - The less educated men assigned penalization that varied according to the severity of the harm done by the agents in the stories.

Uneducated men regard severity of harm for penalization rather than intentions of people. Is the answer not strengthening the conclusion? Please let me know where I'm going wrong.

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Re: In a psychological experiment conducted at Southbay University  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jul 2018, 11:00
The conclusion talks about uneducated men.
In order to weaken the conclusion, we can shatter it by negating the assumption (which is that less educated and uneducated people are the same).

Therefore, when the argument says that less educated people don't consider the intentions while assigning punishments, it applies to uneducated people through the conclusion statement.

Option E correctly addresses this and hence weakens the argument appropriately.
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Re: In a psychological experiment conducted at Southbay University &nbs [#permalink] 07 Jul 2018, 11:00
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