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In countries where healthcare is universal and provided free of charge

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In countries where healthcare is universal and provided free of charge  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Mar 2016, 10:40
1
9
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A
B
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Difficulty:

  65% (hard)

Question Stats:

63% (02:20) correct 37% (02:30) wrong based on 486 sessions

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In countries where healthcare is universal and provided free of charge by the government, visits per capita to the doctor are twice as frequent as they are in countries where healthcare is paid at least partly out-of-pocket by the consumer. Presently, governments do not have a reliable way of determining whether the symptoms for which these patients were treated for would have otherwise subsided without medical attention. However, this information does not warrant the conclusion by some universal healthcare critics that in the countries with a higher frequency of doctor visits, about half of them are unnecessary. Alternatively, in those countries where healthcare is not free, consumers often forego visits to the doctor except in cases of severe symptoms.

In the argument above, the two boldfaced portions play which of the following roles?

A. The first is a premise that the argument disputes; the second is a conclusion that has been based on that premise.

B. The first is a premise, of which the implications are in dispute in the argument; the second is a claim presented in order to argue against deriving certain implications from that premise.

C. The first is a finding, the accuracy of which is evaluated in the argument; the second is evidence presented to establish the accuracy of the finding

D. The first is a premise that has been used to support a conclusion that the argument accepts; the second is that conclusion.

E. The first is a conclusion that rests upon further evidence within the argument; the second supports that conclusion.
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Re: In countries where healthcare is universal and provided free of charge  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Mar 2016, 12:50
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Vyshak wrote:
In countries where healthcare is universal and provided free of charge by the government, visits per capita to the doctor are twice as frequent as they are in countries where healthcare is paid at least partly out-of-pocket by the consumer. Presently, governments do not have a reliable way of determining whether the symptoms for which these patients were treated for would have otherwise subsided without medical attention. However, this information does not warrant the conclusion by some universal healthcare critics that in the countries with a higher frequency of doctor visits, about half of them are unnecessary. Alternatively, in those countries where healthcare is not free, consumers often forego visits to the doctor except in cases of severe symptoms.

In the argument above, the two boldfaced portions play which of the following roles?

A. The first is a premise that the argument disputes; the second is a conclusion that has been based on that premise.

B. The first is a premise, of which the implications are in dispute in the argument; the second is a claim presented in order to argue against deriving certain implications from that premise.

C. The first is a finding, the accuracy of which is evaluated in the argument; the second is evidence presented to establish the accuracy of the finding

D. The first is a premise that has been used to support a conclusion that the argument accepts; the second is that conclusion.

E. The first is a conclusion that rests upon further evidence within the argument; the second supports that conclusion.


Straightaway (B)

lets deconstruct the stimulus -

Quote:
In countries where healthcare is universal and provided free of charge by the government, visits per capita to the doctor are twice as frequent as they are in countries where healthcare is paid at least partly out-of-pocket by the consumer. Presently, governments do not have a reliable way of determining whether the symptoms for which these patients were treated for would have otherwise subsided without medical attention. However, this information does not warrant the conclusion by some universal healthcare critics that in the countries with a higher frequency of doctor visits, about half of them are unnecessary. Alternatively, in those countries where healthcare is not free, consumers often forego visits to the doctor except in cases of severe symptoms.


From the above stimulus we can find -

The Premises -

In countries where healthcare is universal and provided free of charge by the government, visits per capita to the doctor are twice as frequent as they are in countries where healthcare is paid at least partly out-of-pocket by the consumer



Counter Premise -

However, this information does not warrant the conclusion by some universal healthcare critics that in the countries with a higher frequency of doctor visits, about half of them are unnecessary.

Conclusion -

.......in those countries where healthcare is not free, consumers often forego visits to the doctor except in cases of severe symptoms.



Thus the structure is -

Premises - Premises - Counter premises - Conclusion

Now go for elimination of options -

Quote:
A. The first is a premise that the argument disputes; the second is a conclusion that has been based on that premise.

B. The first is a premise, of which the implications are in dispute in the argument; the second is a claim presented in order to argue against deriving certain implications from that premise.

C. The first is a finding, the accuracy of which is evaluated in the argument; the second is evidence presented to establish the accuracy of the finding

D. The first is a premise that has been used to support a conclusion that the argument accepts; the second is that conclusion.

E. The first is a conclusion that rests upon further evidence within the argument; the second supports that conclusion.


So , IMHO (B)

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Re: In countries where healthcare is universal and provided free of charge  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Mar 2016, 22:27
Vyshak wrote:
In countries where healthcare is universal and provided free of charge by the government, visits per capita to the doctor are twice as frequent as they are in countries where healthcare is paid at least partly out-of-pocket by the consumer. Presently, governments do not have a reliable way of determining whether the symptoms for which these patients were treated for would have otherwise subsided without medical attention. However, this information does not warrant the conclusion by some universal healthcare critics that in the countries with a higher frequency of doctor visits, about half of them are unnecessary. Alternatively, in those countries where healthcare is not free, consumers often forego visits to the doctor except in cases of severe symptoms.

In the argument above, the two boldfaced portions play which of the following roles?

A. The first is a premise that the argument disputes; the second is a conclusion that has been based on that premise.

B. The first is a premise, of which the implications are in dispute in the argument; the second is a claim presented in order to argue against deriving certain implications from that premise.

C. The first is a finding, the accuracy of which is evaluated in the argument; the second is evidence presented to establish the accuracy of the finding

D. The first is a premise that has been used to support a conclusion that the argument accepts; the second is that conclusion.

E. The first is a conclusion that rests upon further evidence within the argument; the second supports that conclusion.


In countries where healthcare is universal and provided free of charge by the government, visits per capita to the doctor are twice as frequent as they are in countries where healthcare is paid at least partly out-of-pocket by the consumer
Alternatively, in those countries where healthcare is not free, consumers often forego visits to the doctor except in cases of severe symptoms.

A and D out - since Second part is not a conclusion.
E out - First part is not conclusion
C - links both the premises, which is not the correct.
B - correct.
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Re: In countries where healthcare is universal and provided free of charge  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Dec 2016, 14:53
rachitshah wrote:
Vyshak wrote:
In countries where healthcare is universal and provided free of charge by the government, visits per capita to the doctor are twice as frequent as they are in countries where healthcare is paid at least partly out-of-pocket by the consumer. Presently, governments do not have a reliable way of determining whether the symptoms for which these patients were treated for would have otherwise subsided without medical attention. However, this information does not warrant the conclusion by some universal healthcare critics that in the countries with a higher frequency of doctor visits, about half of them are unnecessary. Alternatively, in those countries where healthcare is not free, consumers often forego visits to the doctor except in cases of severe symptoms.

In the argument above, the two boldfaced portions play which of the following roles?

A. The first is a premise that the argument disputes; the second is a conclusion that has been based on that premise.

B. The first is a premise, of which the implications are in dispute in the argument; the second is a claim presented in order to argue against deriving certain implications from that premise.

C. The first is a finding, the accuracy of which is evaluated in the argument; the second is evidence presented to establish the accuracy of the finding

D. The first is a premise that has been used to support a conclusion that the argument accepts; the second is that conclusion.

E. The first is a conclusion that rests upon further evidence within the argument; the second supports that conclusion.


In countries where healthcare is universal and provided free of charge by the government, visits per capita to the doctor are twice as frequent as they are in countries where healthcare is paid at least partly out-of-pocket by the consumer
Alternatively, in those countries where healthcare is not free, consumers often forego visits to the doctor except in cases of severe symptoms.

A and D out - since Second part is not a conclusion.
E out - First part is not conclusion
C - links both the premises, which is not the correct.
B - correct.



How is it that the second bolded portion of the argument is the conclusion. How is this an opinion? Isn't the sentence before the second bolded portion the author's opinion? " However, this information does not warrant the conclusion by some universal healthcare critics that in the countries with a higher frequency of doctor visits, about half of them are unnecessary. "
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Re: In countries where healthcare is universal and provided free of charge  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Dec 2016, 01:48
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thehealthcareguy, I don't think anyone is saying that the second bold is the conclusion. It certainly isn't!

However, we shouldn't be studying this problem at all. Someone has just taken an official GMAT question, scrambled the order of the answers, and written a new stimulus that doesn't fit the answers properly. Take a look at the real thing and you'll learn much more:

in-countries-where-automobile-insurance-includes-102322.html
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Re: In countries where healthcare is universal and provided free of charge  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Dec 2018, 15:37
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Re: In countries where healthcare is universal and provided free of charge   [#permalink] 24 Dec 2018, 15:37
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