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In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith,

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In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, [#permalink]

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New post 24 Sep 2013, 04:46
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In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded as the father of economics, defines 'economics' as the 'science of wealth'.

A. In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded as the father of economics, defines
B. Adam Smith, generally considered to be the father of economics, inWealth of Nations, defines
C. In Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded to be the father of economics, defines
D. Adam Smith, generally regarded the father of economics, in his book, Wealth of Nations, defines
E. The father of economics, Adam Smith, defines 'economics', in his book Wealth of Nations as


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Re: In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, [#permalink]

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New post 24 Sep 2013, 05:24
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Re: In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, [#permalink]

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In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded as the father of economics, defines 'economics' as the 'science of wealth'.

A. In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded as the father of economics, defines --> CORRECT
B. Adam Smith, generally considered to be the father of economics, inWealth of Nations, defines --> "considered" is not followed by any preposition
C. In Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded to be the father of economics, defines --> Correct idiom is "regarded as"
D. Adam Smith, generally regarded the father of economics, in his book, Wealth of Nations, defines --> Same as C
E. The father of economics, Adam Smith, defines 'economics', in his book Wealth of Nations as --> Here Adam Smith is used as a non-essential appositive, which is incorrect
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Re: In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, [#permalink]

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Supernova29 wrote:
In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded as the father of economics, defines 'economics' as the 'science of wealth'.

A. In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded as the father of economics, defines
B. Adam Smith, generally considered to be the father of economics, inWealth of Nations, defines
C. In Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded to be the father of economics, defines
D. Adam Smith, generally regarded the father of economics, in his book, Wealth of Nations, defines
E. The father of economics, Adam Smith, defines 'economics', in his book Wealth of Nations as


:roll: :roll:


Excellent job by TirthankarP.

However, I have another way to solve this question, because some time I can't remember correct idioms.

The idea of this question is that Adam smith defines X as Y in his book. Let analyze basic components of the sentence.
- Subject: Adam Smith
- Object: "economics' -- OR - X.
- Preposition: "in his book" is a preposition phrase of place.

The rule is NEVER put preposition of time/place between Subject and Object. This is a basic grammar rule in English.

In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded as the father of economics, defines 'economics' as the 'science of wealth'.

A. In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded as the father of economics, defines
Correct.
- Regarded as ... --> correct idiom
- Preposition of place is put at the right position.

B. Adam Smith, generally considered to be the father of economics, inWealth of Nations, defines
Wrong.
- B violates the rule by putting preposition between S and O --> readers may understand that Adam Smith is generally regarded as the father of economics in his book.
- "consider to be" is wrong idiom. The correct one is "consider X Y".

C. In Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded to be the father of economics, defines
Wrong.
- "Regarded to be" is wrong idiom.
- C omits "his" in the phrase "in his book" --> changes meaning, because readers may understand that Adam Smith defines XYZ.... in the book Wealth of Nations, which may not be his own book.

D. Adam Smith, generally regarded the father of economics, in his book, Wealth of Nations, defines
Wrong. Same error as in B. Putting preposition of place between S and O always creates ambiguity.

E. The father of economics, Adam Smith, defines 'economics', in his book Wealth of Nations as
Wrong. Same error as in B. Putting preposition of place between S and O always creates ambiguity.

Hope it helps.
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Re: In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, [#permalink]

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New post 24 Sep 2013, 12:58
Thanks a ton tirthankar p and Pqhai. The explanation is pretty clear. :-)

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In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded as the [#permalink]

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In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded as the father of economics, defines 'economics' as the 'science of wealth'.

A. In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded as the father of economics, defines
B. Adam Smith, generally considered to be the father of economics, in Wealth of Nations, defines
C. In Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded to be the father of economics, defines
D. Adam Smith, generally regarded the father of economics, in his book, Wealth of Nations, defines
E. The father of economics, Adam Smith, defines 'economics', in his book Wealth of Nations as

Can some one explain ??
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Re: In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded as the [#permalink]

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New post 26 Feb 2016, 02:57
This seems to be idiom based question and is testing on two idioms: regard as and consider. So, consider to be etc. are incorrect.
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Re: In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded as the [#permalink]

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arjunperiyasamys wrote:
In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded as the father of economics, defines 'economics' as the 'science of wealth'.

A. In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded as the father of economics, defines
B. Adam Smith, generally considered to be the father of economics, in Wealth of Nations, defines
C. In Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded to be the father of economics, defines
D. Adam Smith, generally regarded the father of economics, in his book, Wealth of Nations, defines
E. The father of economics, Adam Smith, defines 'economics', in his book Wealth of Nations as

Can some one explain ??


B. The idiom consider X Y is correct. The usage consider X to be Y is a suspect.
I consider you my friend... correct
I consider you to be my friend......suspect

Moreover it is a bit awkward to place the prepositional phrase in Wealth of Nations in between the subject (Adam Smith) and the verb (defines). It would be better if we placed the phrase either before the subject or after the verb.

C. The usage regarded to be is wrong. The correct idiom is regarded as.

D. The preposition as is missing after regarded. Regard X as Y is the correct usage. Regard X Y is wrong.

E. completely senseless option: 'economics' as is repeated in the sentence - it occurs twice.
Moreover it is a bit awkward to place the prepositional phrase in Wealth of Nations in between the subject (Adam Smith) and the verb (defines). It would be better if we placed the phrase either before the subject or after the verb.

A. Correct. Regarded as is the correct idiom. The prepositional phrase In his book, Wealth of Nations is correctly placed before the subject.
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Re: In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, [#permalink]

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New post 07 Apr 2018, 12:55
sayantanc2k wrote:
arjunperiyasamys wrote:
In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded as the father of economics, defines 'economics' as the 'science of wealth'.

A. In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded as the father of economics, defines
B. Adam Smith, generally considered to be the father of economics, in Wealth of Nations, defines
C. In Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, generally regarded to be the father of economics, defines
D. Adam Smith, generally regarded the father of economics, in his book, Wealth of Nations, defines
E. The father of economics, Adam Smith, defines 'economics', in his book Wealth of Nations as

Can some one explain ??


B. The idiom consider X Y is correct. The usage consider X to be Y is a suspect.
I consider you my friend... correct
I consider you to be my friend......suspect



Moreover it is a bit awkward to place the prepositional phrase in Wealth of Nations in between the subject (Adam Smith) and the verb (defines). It would be better if we placed the phrase either before the subject or after the verb.

C. The usage regarded to be is wrong. The correct idiom is regarded as.

D. The preposition as is missing after regarded. Regard X as Y is the correct usage. Regard X Y is wrong.

E. completely senseless option: 'economics' as is repeated in the sentence - it occurs twice.
Moreover it is a bit awkward to place the prepositional phrase in Wealth of Nations in between the subject (Adam Smith) and the verb (defines). It would be better if we placed the phrase either before the subject or after the verb.

A. Correct. Regarded as is the correct idiom. The prepositional phrase In his book, Wealth of Nations is correctly placed before the subject.



sayantanc2k, why it is awkward to place prepositional phrase between subject and verb. I eliminated B because of "consider to be" but couldn't see ur reasoning. could you provide more detail please.
Re: In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith,   [#permalink] 07 Apr 2018, 12:55
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In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith,

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