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In large corporations, departments that have little interaction

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Joined: 15 Nov 2017
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In large corporations, departments that have little interaction  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Sep 2018, 10:33
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A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  55% (hard)

Question Stats:

55% (01:16) correct 45% (01:27) wrong based on 29 sessions

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In large corporations, departments that have little interaction with one another have limited knowledge of one another's challenges and capabilities. Because synergy and efficiency depend on understanding the challenges and capabilities of others, it logically follows that, in large corporations, ___________.

Which of the following best completes the passage?

A. it is not possible for most departments to work together to find synergies and efficiencies
B. only departments that interact with one another frequently can find synergies and efficiencies with one another
C. managers' claims of synergy and efficiency between departments are largely exaggerated
D. the best way to increase synergy and efficiency is to require departments to regularly interact with one another
E. without some interaction between departments there will be missed opportunities to find synergy and efficiency

Spoiler: :: OE

Official Explanation


For this "best completes the passage" problem, it is first important to diagnose what type of question you're dealing with. Here the preface to the underlined portion is "it logically follows that," indicating that this is an Inference problem, so your correct answer must be true based on the premises. The "must be true" inference standard will be instrumental in your assessment of many incorrect answers as you employ process-of-elimination.

For choice A, recognize that you don't know whether most departments in most large companies interact regularly with one another. If they do - something not at all ruled out by the premises - then it could be expected that most departments will find synergies and efficiencies. This valid hypothetical situation rules out A.

For choice B, notice the strong language with "only" and the blander language with "find (some) synergies and efficiencies." Is it possible for at least some departments who only have limited knowledge of one another to find some synergies and efficiencies? Certainly it must be possible - the premises do not rule it out - so this choice falls victim to the extreme "only" language.

Choice C goes far beyond the scope of the argument, which doesn't even mention managers' claims of synergy and efficiency. Could it be that managers only claim these successes when synergy really happens because of large-scale interaction between departments? The premises don't rule this out - again you don't know anything about managers' claims - so C does not have to be true.

Choice D uses extreme language - "the best way" - and is therefore easier to attack. What if mandatory frequent interaction is a good way to increase synergy and efficiency, but the best way is for corporate structures to ensure that such interaction happens naturally? Choice D is incorrect.

Choice E has the benefit of soft language - without some interaction there will be (some) missed opportunities. This must be true, as more knowledge from more interaction would lead to more synergy, so relying on limited knowledge and interaction will mean that "some" missed opportunities would have to be true. Choice E is correct.

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Re: In large corporations, departments that have little interaction  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Sep 2018, 21:18
aggvipul wrote:
In large corporations, departments that have little interaction with one another have limited knowledge of one another's challenges and capabilities. Because synergy and efficiency depend on understanding the challenges and capabilities of others, it logically follows that, in large corporations, ___________.

Which of the following best completes the passage?

A. it is not possible for most departments to work together to find synergies and efficiencies
B. only departments that interact with one another frequently can find synergies and efficiencies with one another
C. managers' claims of synergy and efficiency between departments are largely exaggerated
D. the best way to increase synergy and efficiency is to require departments to regularly interact with one another
E. without some interaction between departments there will be missed opportunities to find synergy and efficiency

Spoiler: :: OE

Official Explanation


For this "best completes the passage" problem, it is first important to diagnose what type of question you're dealing with. Here the preface to the underlined portion is "it logically follows that," indicating that this is an Inference problem, so your correct answer must be true based on the premises. The "must be true" inference standard will be instrumental in your assessment of many incorrect answers as you employ process-of-elimination.

For choice A, recognize that you don't know whether most departments in most large companies interact regularly with one another. If they do - something not at all ruled out by the premises - then it could be expected that most departments will find synergies and efficiencies. This valid hypothetical situation rules out A.

For choice B, notice the strong language with "only" and the blander language with "find (some) synergies and efficiencies." Is it possible for at least some departments who only have limited knowledge of one another to find some synergies and efficiencies? Certainly it must be possible - the premises do not rule it out - so this choice falls victim to the extreme "only" language.

Choice C goes far beyond the scope of the argument, which doesn't even mention managers' claims of synergy and efficiency. Could it be that managers only claim these successes when synergy really happens because of large-scale interaction between departments? The premises don't rule this out - again you don't know anything about managers' claims - so C does not have to be true.

Choice D uses extreme language - "the best way" - and is therefore easier to attack. What if mandatory frequent interaction is a good way to increase synergy and efficiency, but the best way is for corporate structures to ensure that such interaction happens naturally? Choice D is incorrect.

Choice E has the benefit of soft language - without some interaction there will be (some) missed opportunities. This must be true, as more knowledge from more interaction would lead to more synergy, so relying on limited knowledge and interaction will mean that "some" missed opportunities would have to be true. Choice E is correct.


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Re: In large corporations, departments that have little interaction &nbs [#permalink] 05 Sep 2018, 21:18
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