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It is hard to find a politician who doesn’t have some sort of plan

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New post 31 Mar 2015, 09:43
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Part of New Project-->[url=http://gmatclub.com/forum/new-project-reading-comprehension-review-practice-195318.html]Reading Comprehension!!- Review/ Practice[/url]



It is hard to find a politician who doesn’t have some sort of plan for energy independence, but we will never see true independence from foreign sources of energy without making the kind of sacrifices that elected officials are loath to mention. For example, virtually every politician campaigning for national office touts biofuels, especially ethanol, as a solution to our nation’s energy dependence. However, the actual energy that can be harvested from these sources is miniscule compared to our current level of consumption—about 20 million barrels of oil and gasoline per day.

We need to take serious, even drastic, steps now. Nuclear fuel, despite all its promise, is understandably controversial, and the problem of dealing with radioactive waste will not go away anytime soon. We might find an acceptable method of drilling for oil in environmentally sensitive areas such as the Alaskan wilderness, but this too will take some time, and will only take us so far down the road to energy independence.

Thus, it is the level of consumption, rather than our sources of energy, that needs to change; putting our resources into developing alternative energy sources will only obscure this unavoidable fact. One way policymakers might affect the level of energy consumption is by increasing taxes on gasoline. In accordance with the principles of a free-market economy, such as that of our own nation, if the price of gasoline were to double due to the addition of such taxes, oil consumption would drop by 3 to 5 million barrels per day.

We also need to overhaul the way in which we move goods around the country. Using gas-guzzling trucks for cross-country trips is extremely inefficient. Moving away from the use of trucks for long-haul trips will require significant governmental and private investment in new water transport and electric railway infrastructure. Once this infrastructure is in place, however, these methods of shipping will be much more energy efficient for all but local transportation of goods.

These and other real solutions to our energy dependence issues will be unpopular in many quarters. Car and truck manufacturers will use their considerable political muscle to fight not only significant gas tax hikes, but also stringent fuel efficiency requirements on vehicles. The move away from trucking will be resisted by both the “big-box” retail outlets, which depend on trucks for the delivery of goods, and by the trucking industry itself. The farming industry will do everything it can to push for the widespread use of ethanol and other plant-based fuels. But it is consumer resistance that most needs to be overcome. Too many of us believe that the guarantee of cheap fuel is an inalienable right, and balk at funding public transportation.

Recently, there has been a gradual change in attitude as people start to connect their daily habits with larger environmental concerns. Until enough of us make that connection and are willing to make a few lifestyle changes accordingly, we have no business complaining about our energy dependence on other countries.


1. What does the author of the passage believe is most important for lessening our need for foreign sources of energy?

A. The political courage of elected officials to make tough decisions.
B. Civic responsibility on the part of the automotive industry.
C. The willingness of consumers to change their habits.
D. A restructuring of the farming and trucking industries.
E. The development of safe alternatives to oil.




2. Which of the following best characterizes the author’s opinion of ethanol?

A. Despite its popularity with politicians, it will not have enough impact to substantially lessen our dependence on foreign sources of energy.
B. The influence of the farming industry will prevent it from becoming available to most consumers.
C. It is the most practical of the various plant-based biofuels available.
D. Its use will play a small part in reducing our energy needs.
E. It is unlikely to be useful as a way of our gaining energy independence because of consumer resistance to its use



3. It can be inferred that the author believes that a tax increase on gasoline _______.

A. is not feasible because politicians do not understand the issue enough to call for such a raise
B. will limit the transporting of goods by “big-box” retail outlets
C. will reduce our annual consumption by approximately 4 million gallons
D. will only be possible after improvements have been made in automobile fuel efficiency
E. will use the fundamentals of free-market economics to address the problem of energy dependence



4. The primary purpose of the second paragraph of the passage is to _______.

A. dismiss some alternative forms of energy that are unpopular with big business
B. show that there are not enough new alternatives for becoming less dependent on foreign sources of energy
C. provide historical background for the problem of energy-dependence
D. show the problems inherent in two sources of energy that could help us be come more energy-independent
E. ridicule any attempt to solve the problem of energy-dependence that does not take into account consumption levels



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New post 14 Sep 2015, 11:28
Regarding the 3rd question,
the passage says
Quote:
One way policymakers might affect the level of energy consumption is by increasing taxes on gasoline. In accordance with the principles of a free-market economy, such as that of our own nation, if the price of gasoline were to double due to the addition of such taxes, oil consumption would drop by 3 to 5 million barrels per day.


According to free market eco principles, usage will reduce to x barrels.
But nowhere it is mentioned that
A tax increase on gasoline will use the fundamentals of free-market economics to address the problem of energy dependence.
Then how can we infer Option E?
Also explain each option why it is wrong/right?
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Re: It is hard to find a politician who doesn’t have some sort of plan  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Sep 2015, 01:50
mayankgupta01 wrote:
In 4th question what is wrong with E option??


We need to take serious, even drastic, steps now. Nuclear fuel, despite all its promise, is understandably controversial, and the problem of dealing with radioactive waste will not go away anytime soon. We might find an acceptable method of drilling for oil in environmentally sensitive areas such as the Alaskan wilderness, but this too will take some time, and will only take us so far down the road to energy independence.

This gives the reason why Nuclear fuel and Acceptable method of drilling for oil in environmentally sensitive areas contain problems although they have the capacity to our energy dependency.

4. The primary purpose of the second paragraph of the passage is to _______.

A. dismiss some alternative forms of energy that are unpopular with big business
B. show that there are not enough new alternatives for becoming less dependent on foreign sources of energy
C. provide historical background for the problem of energy-dependence
D. show the problems inherent in two sources of energy that could help us be come more energy-independent
E. ridicule any attempt to solve the problem of energy-dependence that does not take into account consumption levels

Here the authors just shows or explains the difficulties of two resources.
Ridicule indicates harsh criticism is way too extreme wording.
He does not criticize any attempt to solve problem instead he is concerned regarding it.
So E is extremely wrong choice.
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Re: It is hard to find a politician who doesn’t have some sort of plan  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Sep 2015, 21:10
For the question number 2, I was confused between A and E...
I agree that A is right option..
But can anyone tell me why option E is wrong? I donot understand why option E is wrong...
The 5th paragraph clearly states that -->
The farming industry will do everything it can to push for the widespread use of ethanol and other plant-based fuels. But it is consumer resistance that most needs to be overcome.

Can we not infer that "author believes in the option E" ???
What is wrong in my thinking?
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New post 19 Sep 2015, 22:02
1
MorningRunner wrote:
For the question number 2, I was confused between A and E...
I agree that A is right option..
But can anyone tell me why option E is wrong? I do not understand why option E is wrong...
The 5th paragraph clearly states that -->
The farming industry will do everything it can to push for the widespread use of ethanol and other plant-based fuels.
But it is consumer resistance that most needs to be overcome.


Can we not infer that "author believes in the option E" ???
What is wrong in my thinking?


when u refer to
Quote:
The farming industry will do everything it can to push for the widespread use of ethanol and other plant-based fuels.
But it is consumer resistance that most needs to be overcome.

it means that farming will try to promote ethanol and others but customer needs to prefer them to gasoline.
but well before that in the end of first para the author mentions that
Quote:
every politician campaigning for national office touts biofuels, especially ethanol, as a solution to our nation’s energy dependence. However, the actual energy that can be harvested from these sources is miniscule compared to our current level of consumption—about 20 million barrels of oil and gasoline per day.


farmers to improve their sales of plant based fuels and politicians to impress farmers support or promote ethanol as solution,
but ethanol cannot generate much energy needed for our consumption.
so A is the perfect answer which properly conveys the meaning.

coming to E, it says
Quote:
E. It is unlikely to be useful as a way of our gaining energy independence because of consumer resistance to its use

It is true that ethanol is unlikely to be useful as a way of our gaining energy independence
but the reason for that to happen is not customer resistance to it but its own less capacity to generate needed energy.

I hope this helps :-D
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1


It is hard to find a politician who doesn’t have some sort of plan for energy independence, but we will never see true independence from foreign sources of energy without making the kind of
sacrifices that elected officials are loath to mention. For example, virtually every politician campaigning for national office touts biofuels, especially ethanol, as a solution to our nation’s energy dependence. However, the actual energy that can be harvested from these sources is miniscule compared to our current level of consumption—about 20 million barrels of oil and gasoline per day. We need to take serious, even drastic, steps now. Nuclear fuel, despite all its promise, is understandably controversial, and the problem of dealing with radioactive waste will not go away anytime soon. We might find an acceptable method of drilling for oil in environmentally sensitive areas such as the Alaskan wilderness, but this too will take some time, and will only take us so far down the road to energy independence. Thus, it is the level of consumption, rather than our sources of energy, that needs to change; putting our resources into developing alternative energy sources will only obscure this unavoidable fact. One way policymakers might affect the level of energy consumption is by increasing taxes on gasoline. In accordance with the principles of a free-market economy, such as that of our own nation, if the price of gasoline were to double due to the addition of such taxes, oil consumption would drop by 3 to 5 million barrels per day. We also need to overhaul the way in which we move goods around the country. Using gas-guzzling trucks for cross-country trips is extremely inefficient. Moving away from the use of trucks for long-haul trips will require significant governmental and private investment in new water transport and electric railway infrastructure. Once
this infrastructure is in place, however, these methods of shipping will be much more energy efficient for all but local transportation of goods. These and other real solutions to our energy dependence issues will be unpopular in many quarters. Car and truck manufacturers will use their considerable political muscle to fight not only significant gas tax hikes, but also stringent fuel efficiency requirements on vehicles. The move away from trucking will be resisted by both the “big-box” retail outlets, which depend on trucks for the delivery of goods, and by the trucking industry itself. The farming industry will do everything it can to push for the widespread use of ethanol and other plant-based fuels. But it is consumer resistance that most needs to be overcome. Too many of us believe that the guarantee of cheap fuel is an inalienable right, and balk at funding public transportation. Recently, there has been a gradual change in attitude as people start to connect their daily habits with larger environmental concerns. Until enough of us make that connection and are willing to make a few lifestyle changes accordingly, we have no business complaining about our energy dependence on other countries.
What does the author of the passage believe is most important for lessening our need for foreign sources of energy?

(A) The political courage of elected officials to make tough decisions
(B) Civic responsibility on the part of the automotive industry
(C) The willingness of consumers to change their habits
(D) A restructuring of the farming and trucking industries
(E) The development of safe alternatives to oil

Spoiler: :: OA
C


Which of the following best characterizes the author’s opinion of ethanol?

(A) Despite its popularity with politicians, it will not have enough impact to substantially lessen our dependence on foreign sources of energy.
(B) The influence of the farming industry will prevent it from becoming available to most consumers.
(C) It is the most practical of the various plant-based biofuels available.
(D) Its use will play a small part in reducing our energy needs.
(E) It is unlikely to be useful as a way of our gaining energy independence because of consumer resistance to its use.

Spoiler: :: OA
A


It can be inferred that the author believes that a tax increase on gasoline _______.

(A) is not feasible because politicians do not understand the issue enough to call for such a raise
(B) will limit the transporting of goods by “big-box” retail outlets
(C) will reduce our annual consumption by approximately 4 million gallons
(D) will only be possible after improvements have been made in automobile fuel efficiency
(E) will use the fundamentals of free-market economics to address the problem of energy dependence

Spoiler: :: OA
E


The primary purpose of the second paragraph of the passage is to _______.

(A) dismiss some alternative forms of energy that are unpopular with big business
(B) show that there are not enough new alternatives for becoming less dependent on foreign sources of energy
(C) provide historical background for the problem of energy-dependence
(D) show the problems inherent in two sources of energy that could help us be come more energy-independent
(E) ridicule any attempt to solve the problem of energy-dependence that does not take into account consumption levels

Spoiler: :: OA
D


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Re: QOTD #1 It is hard to find a politician who doesn’t have some sort of  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jun 2016, 03:17
My views--

1.C.
2.E.
3.C.
4.D.(Not sure of this question)
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New post 05 Jun 2016, 03:53
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Re: QOTD #1 It is hard to find a politician who doesn’t have some sort of  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jun 2016, 20:52
1
1. C
Thus, it is the level of consumption, rather than our sources of energy, that needs to change;

2. A

Ethanol is provided as an example for the things that do not reduce our foreign sources of energy.
For example, virtually every politician campaigning for national office touts biofuels, especially ethanol, as a solution to our nation’s energy dependence. However, the actual energy that can be harvested from these sources is miniscule compared to our current level of consumption—about 20 million barrels of oil and gasoline per day.

3.
In accordance with the principles of a free-market economy, such as that of our own nation, if the price of gasoline were to double due to the addition of such taxes, oil consumption would drop by 3 to 5 million barrels per day.
C) 3 to 5 barrels per days , from which we could not approximate to 4 million gallons per year ; i think one barrel is around 42 gallons.
E) Correct.

4. E or D.
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New post 06 Jun 2016, 01:34
babuvgmat wrote:
1. C
Thus, it is the level of consumption, rather than our sources of energy, that needs to change;

2. A

Ethanol is provided as an example for the things that do not reduce our foreign sources of energy.
For example, virtually every politician campaigning for national office touts biofuels, especially ethanol, as a solution to our nation’s energy dependence. However, the actual energy that can be harvested from these sources is miniscule compared to our current level of consumption—about 20 million barrels of oil and gasoline per day.

3.
In accordance with the principles of a free-market economy, such as that of our own nation, if the price of gasoline were to double due to the addition of such taxes, oil consumption would drop by 3 to 5 million barrels per day.
C) 3 to 5 barrels per days , from which we could not approximate to 4 million gallons per year ; i think one barrel is around 42 gallons.
E) Correct.

4. E or D.





How is A for question No. 2. please clarify.
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New post 06 Jun 2016, 02:07
Quote:
For example, virtually every politician campaigning for national office touts biofuels, especially ethanol, as a solution to our nation’s energy dependence. However, the actual energy that can be harvested from these sources is miniscule compared to our current level of consumption—about 20 million barrels of oil and gasoline per day.


The other options are not mentioned.

B) the farming industry, actually, wants ethanol to be used
C) The comparison is never made
D) Never state in the passage that we will reduce to 0% our dependency for foreign energy supply, in generl
E) No mention is stated about consumers resisting to use ethanol
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New post 02 Oct 2017, 03:08
i am not sure of the question number 3?? why E
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New post 12 Oct 2017, 18:46
For Q4, could you please elaborate on why option E is incorrect and D is correct.
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New post 26 Dec 2017, 05:14
All correct in 7 mins 30 seconds , including 3 mins 45 seconds to read . Was in a fix for Q4 between options B and D though.
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New post 26 Dec 2017, 13:52
In my case, I was confused between C and E
But I am now clearly understand why the OA is E

3. It can be inferred that the author believes that a tax increase on gasoline _______.

A. is not feasible because politicians do not understand the issue enough to call for such a raise
-> Understanding of politians is not mentioned anywhere.
B. will limit the transporting of goods by ???big-box??? retail outlets
-> Not mentioned
C. will reduce our annual consumption by approximately 4 million gallons
-> If tax is doubled, then consumption would be 3 to 5 million
gallons.
But we do not know the rate of tax increase!!
If tax is doubled, C is possible but there is no mention!!
D. will only be possible after improvements have been made in automobile fuel efficiency
-> Only? No.
E. will use the fundamentals of free-market economics to address the problem of energy dependence
-> Correct. This passage talks about energy independence.
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New post 28 Dec 2017, 10:37
1
Hi, please can anybody give a comment on D?

2. Which of the following best characterizes the author’s opinion of ethanol?
A. Despite its popularity with politicians, it will not have enough impact to substantially lessen our dependence on foreign sources of energy.
B. The influence of the farming industry will prevent it from becoming available to most consumers.
C. It is the most practical of the various plant-based biofuels available.
D. Its use will play a small part in reducing our energy needs.
E. It is unlikely to be useful as a way of our gaining energy independence because of consumer resistance to its use

I chose the correct answer, but was in doubt for D. Is it because of the wording '...will play a small part...' that is not actually mentioned how big or small in the paragraph. Although I think one can reasonably infer '...minuscule effect...' could have a similar meaning to '...play a small part'.

Thanks
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New post 01 Mar 2018, 13:28
jawele wrote:
Hi, please can anybody give a comment on D?

2. Which of the following best characterizes the author’s opinion of ethanol?
A. Despite its popularity with politicians, it will not have enough impact to substantially lessen our dependence on foreign sources of energy.
B. The influence of the farming industry will prevent it from becoming available to most consumers.
C. It is the most practical of the various plant-based biofuels available.
D. Its use will play a small part in reducing our energy needs.
E. It is unlikely to be useful as a way of our gaining energy independence because of consumer resistance to its use

I chose the correct answer, but was in doubt for D. Is it because of the wording '...will play a small part...' that is not actually mentioned how big or small in the paragraph. Although I think one can reasonably infer '...minuscule effect...' could have a similar meaning to '...play a small part'.

Thanks


I think to your point as well, the "dependence on foreign sources of energy" part of the argument is the intended focus on the author's passage. But likewise, I initially paused between the two answer choices.
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New post 01 Mar 2018, 23:15
Please provide explanations for Question 2 & 4 ans how to use POE for each answer choice for the two questions.

Thank you.
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New post 13 Mar 2018, 09:07
Please provide explanations for 4 ans as i am confused between ans B and D.
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