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Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind

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Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind [#permalink]

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Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of composer who receives popular acclaim while living, often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again.

(A) often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again

(B) whose reputation declines after death and never regains its status again

(C) but whose reputation declines after death and never regains its former status

(D) who declines in reputation after death and who never regained popularity again

(E) then has declined in reputation after death and never regained popularity
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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New post 18 Aug 2007, 07:04
I like C.

Contrast is clearly shown between the time when the composers live and the time after their death.

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Re: SC - Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer (OG11) [#permalink]

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pau.sabria wrote:
Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of composer who receives popular acclaim while living, often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again.

(A) often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again

regains popularity again is redundant usage. Also, once the composer is dead, he cannot often go into decline!

(B) whose reputation declines after death and never regains its status again

... regain again is redundant usage again

(C) but whose reputation declines after death and never regains its former status

(D) who declines in reputation after death and who never regained popularity again

declines in reputation seems awkward; regained is in the wrong tense

(E) then has declined in reputation after death and never regained popularity
has declined in reputation after death is awkward - present perfect is not required here


I think C uses the coordinate conjunction but preceded by a comma correctly; C creates two independent clauses properly contrasted by the use of BUT that creates the desired effect of the statement - the kind of composer WHO receives popular acclaim while living, BUT whose (points to the composer properly) reputation declines after death and never regains its former status

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I will go with C as well. The use of "but" makes the sentence more meanigful.
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OA is C.

Thanks to you all.

However, official explanation says:

(B) The two clauses are not parallel, lack of coordinating conjunction, and do not describe the same thing; reduntant again.

(C) Correct. This sentence presents the proper logic while maintaining parallel structure and consistent verb tense.

Can anybody explain me why (B) is not describing the same thing and (C) is?

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Re: SC - Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer (OG11) [#permalink]

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New post 11 Mar 2008, 18:31
i think the only error with B is "regain ... again"

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Re: SC - Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer (OG11) [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jan 2010, 01:45
dwivedys wrote:
pau.sabria wrote:
Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of composer who receives popular acclaim while living, often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again.

(A) often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again

regains popularity again is redundant usage. Also, once the composer is dead, he cannot often go into decline!

(B) whose reputation declines after death and never regains its status again

... regain again is redundant usage again

(C) but whose reputation declines after death and never regains its former status

(D) who declines in reputation after death and who never regained popularity again

declines in reputation seems awkward; regained is in the wrong tense

(E) then has declined in reputation after death and never regained popularity
has declined in reputation after death is awkward - present perfect is not required here


I think C uses the coordinate conjunction but preceded by a comma correctly; C creates two independent clauses properly contrasted by the use of BUT that creates the desired effect of the statement - the kind of composer WHO receives popular acclaim while living, BUT whose (points to the composer properly) reputation declines after death and never regains its former status

tks for your detailed explanation! It helps me a lot!

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Re: SC - Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer (OG11) [#permalink]

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New post 31 Aug 2011, 05:15
Besides option C no other option uses a fitting contrasting word (which is required to have emphasis on different parts of life of such composers)
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind [#permalink]

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New post 31 Mar 2012, 22:43
use of contrasting word 'but' is very crucial here. rest of mostly have wrong modifications
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind [#permalink]

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New post 01 Apr 2012, 03:19
I'd also go with C. Obviously the composer doesn't decline after death, but his reputation does. But stresses the change in the reputation from life to the time after death.

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Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of composer who receives popular acclaim while living, often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again.

(A) often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again
(B) whose reputation declines after death and never regains its status again
(C) but whose reputation declines after death and never regains its former status
(D) who declines in reputation after death and who never regained popularity again
(E) then has declined in reputation after death and never regained popularity
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind [#permalink]

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Concept tested: Redundancy, preposition, parallelism, modifiers.
Difficulty: 700
Illustration: Carefully examine the following sentence
My sister, who is a teenager, and whose street play was appreciated by all, won the local talent award yesterday.
This is a perfectly correct sentence as “who is a teenager” and “whose street play was appreciated by all” both modifier the subject “My sister”.

Now lets look at the options.
A is wrong because the composer does not go into decline after his or her death, but his or her reputation does.
B is incorrect because it uses redundant construction “regains its status again”.
D and E are wrong for the same reason we eliminated A i.e the composer himself does not go into decline after death.
C is correct (option C breaks the FANBOYS rule, which a lot of prep companies advocate to eliminate answer choices. Please see below for clarification.).

Tip:
A lot of prep companies adopt the rule of FANBOYS which says
Independent clause, independent clause is a run on sentence.
o to make it correct we use the construction:
Independent clause, FANBOYS independent clause; FANBOYS stands for “For, And, Not, But, Or, Yet, So”.
However, the converse is not necessarily true. Two clauses separated by comma and FANBOYS do not necessarily mean they need to be independent clauses.
E.g My brother loves to drive so fast that his co passengers often fear being headlined in the newspapers the following day, and hates to wear seat-belts.
The sentence without the punctuation would become haywire.
Also, the punctuation rules are not tested on the GMAT.

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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind [#permalink]

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souvik101990 wrote:
Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of composer who receives popular acclaim while living, often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again.

(A) often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again
(B) whose reputation declines after death and never regains its status again
(C) but whose reputation declines after death and never regains its former status
(D) who declines in reputation after death and who never regained popularity again
(E) then has declined in reputation after death and never regained popularity


I will go with {C}

(A) presents a List - "kind of composer who receives X, often goes Y, and never regains Z. But the sentence wants to show how the popularity of such composers decline after their death.
(B) whose referring to what?
(D) creates parallel list by using "who" - not required, we need to show contrast of what happens when the composer is alive and what happens after his death.
(E) then has declined - What has declined?
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind [#permalink]

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The first split is going to be on redundancy. Regain and again do not go together. So, let’s remove A, B and D.
Second, between C and E, E distorts the meaning saying that the composer has declined, and never regained his popularity, especially after death. Can a dead person decline and regain? But the intended meaning is that the reputation declines and never regains its earlier status. Hence C.
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind [#permalink]

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daagh wrote:
The first split is going to be on redundancy. Regain and again do not go together. So, let’s remove A, B and D.
Second, between C and E, E distorts the meaning saying that the composer has declined, and never regained his popularity, especially after death. Can a dead person decline and regain? But the intended meaning is that the reputation declines and never regains its earlier status. Hence C.


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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind [#permalink]

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We have covered this sentence in our article "Alien word not so alien". This sentence is easy if you pay attention to meaning:

alien-words-not-so-alien-136331.html

Here is the explanation:

Let me just compare the correct answer choice (C) with the original answer choice (A):
A. often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again
C. but whose reputation declines after death and never regains its former status

The first thing to notice here is that Choice C has far many new words than Choice A. These words are “but, whose, reputation, former, status”. Yet, this choice is the correct answer.
Now let’s analyze both these answer choices from meaning standpoint to better understand the role of the alien words in choice C.

Choice A: Per this choice, the sentence says that a certain kind of composer gains popularity while alive, declines after death and never regains his popularity. This meaning just does not make sense because once the composer has died, he cannot decline any further. This choice conveys absolutely illogical meaning.

Choice C: Per this answer choice, a certain kind of composer gains popularity when alive, but after death, his reputation declines and it never regains its previous status. Indeed. This answer choice makes all the sense and hence is the correct answer choice.

Look at the article to see some other examples that test this concept.
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind [#permalink]

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New post 25 Sep 2012, 13:36
souvik101990 wrote:
Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of composer who receives popular acclaim while living, often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again.

(A) often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again
(B) whose reputation declines after death and never regains its status again
(C) but whose reputation declines after death and never regains its former status
(D) who declines in reputation after death and who never regained popularity again
(E) then has declined in reputation after death and never regained popularity



here we have a clear example how the gmat now has a major stress on meaning, eliminating words that change the meaning of the sentence.

Focus on the word: reputation. this word is the key point because makes sense to us of what is before (the composers are popular during their life) and what happens after their death (decline of reputation)

1) wrong: lack of this key word

Now I use one of the strategy I love the most (kaplan): one you have eliminated A compare 2 sentence at time, in this scenario: B and C. This one is useful in particular now that gmat use sentences with no clear split among the choices, with an increase of difficulty.

2) whose reputation declines after death and never regains its status again

3) but whose reputation declines after death and never regains its former status

Notice the lack of conjunction in 2 BUT and status again VS former status. here the meaning tends to a former status because we have a previous status (fame), then a lower status (after death). Moreover, in 2 we have regains and after gains, redundant. Hold 3 for now

4) who declines in reputation after death and who never regained popularity again.

here the underlined portion starts with WHO and you suddenly must be think what : ehi we have already WHO before, in the non-underlined portion. As soon as you see somethings like this you can eliminate the answer. We do not care about implication, why could be wrong or right, up and down...........no way. WRONG no matter what

5) then has declined in reputation after death and never regained popularity.

Often, in gmat land, certain kind of answer are impossible, with a lack of sense, regardless.

C) is the answer

As you can see i always try to follow one of the most usefull instruction of Ron from MGMAT: be flexible. If you haven't a split, switch strategy as soon as, or viceversa......you know ;)
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Re: Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind [#permalink]

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New post 10 Oct 2012, 00:36
Concept tested: Redundancy, preposition, parallelism, modifiers.
Difficulty: 700
Illustration: Carefully examine the following sentence
My sister, who is a teenager, and whose street play was appreciated by all, won the local talent award yesterday.
This is a perfectly correct sentence as “who is a teenager” and “whose street play was appreciated by all” both modifier the subject “My sister”.

Now lets look at the options.
A is wrong because the composer does not go into decline after his or her death, but his or her reputation does.
B is incorrect because it uses redundant construction “regains its status again”.
D and E are wrong for the same reason we eliminated A i.e the composer himself does not go into decline after death.
C is correct (option C breaks the FANBOYS rule, which a lot of prep companies advocate to eliminate answer choices. Please see below for clarification.).

Tip:
A lot of prep companies adopt the rule of FANBOYS which says
Independent clause, independent clause is a run on sentence.
o to make it correct we use the construction:
Independent clause, FANBOYS independent clause; FANBOYS stands for “For, And, Not, But, Or, Yet, So”.
However, the converse is not necessarily true. Two clauses separated by comma and FANBOYS do not necessarily mean they need to be independent clauses.
E.g My brother loves to drive so fast that his co passengers often fear being headlined in the newspapers the following day, and hates to wear seat-belts.
The sentence without the punctuation would become haywire.
Also, the punctuation rules are not tested on the GMAT.

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Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind [#permalink]

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Joachim Raff and Giacomo Meyerbeer are examples of the kind of composer who receives popular acclaim while living, often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again.

(A) often goes into decline after death, and never regains popularity again
(B) whose reputation declines after death and never regains its status again
(C) but whose reputation declines after death and never regains its former status
(D) who declines in reputation after death and who never regained popularity again
(E) then has declined in reputation after death and never regained popularity

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Re: OG13 V-137 [#permalink]

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Underline the part, which you want us to correct.

joachim-raff-and-giacomo-meyerbeer-are-examples-of-the-kind-139350.html
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Re: OG13 V-137   [#permalink] 12 Oct 2012, 01:22

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